Question Can I clone my ssd and use it in a new pc with different hardware?

Nov 21, 2020
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I want to clone my drive and use it in a new pc with different hardware. It this possible, how would I do this? Thanks
 
I see. So I would use a system image for this scenario. Correct?
You use a USB key with Windows 10 on it. For that you use Microsoft Media Creation Tool - https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=691209

You start the program on a system running. You follow the instruction to create an install disk and choose your USB key. It will create a Windows 10 OS install key then you use that to install Windows 10 on the new system.
 

USAFRet

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I want to clone my drive and use it in a new pc with different hardware. It this possible, how would I do this? Thanks
Cloning and moving to different hardware is no different than moving the physical drive to new hardware.
An Image is also no different.

You don't.

A clean install of your OS in the new hardware.
 

LeighPing

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I want to clone my drive and use it in a new pc with different hardware. It this possible, how would I do this? Thanks
Actually, you can do that, I did. I then needed to download the software appropriate to the new hardware. Chipsets, drivers and programs. etc. A fresh clean install may well have been easier. Good luck.

I used a program called Macrium reflect to clone my old drive. Then I copied the clone to a new drive and put the new drive into the new system motherboard.
 
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USAFRet

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Actually, you can do that, I did. I then needed to download the software appropriate to the new hardware. Chipsets, drivers and programs. etc. A fresh clean install may well have been easier. Good luck.
"Actually, you can do that, I did. "
Except for all the times it fails, doing exactly that.

Moving a drive+OS (or a clone) to new hardware has 3 possible outcomes:
  1. It just works
  2. It fails
  3. It works, but you're chasing issues for weeks/months.
Sorry, but there is no "100% it just works".
 

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"Actually, you can do that, I did. "
Except for all the times it fails, doing exactly that.

Moving a drive+OS (or a clone) to new hardware has 3 possible outcomes:
  1. It just works
  2. It fails
  3. It works, but you're chasing issues for weeks/months.
Sorry, but there is no "100% it just works".
True enough. There are no guarantees. Is it possible though? Yes it is. For my needs, I managed to make it work as required. :)
 

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And that is why saying "Yes you can" is less than helpful.
It leads people down the wrong path, thinking it always "just works".
Is it 'less than helpful' to have a question answered, based on others experiences of having done what the original poster also wishes to do? :) It may be difficult, but it's not impossible. :eek: The various answers have outlined that point. I suppose that it's down to the OP to weigh up those points and make a decision based on the risks, and the work involved. Nobody is wrong, or misleading, if they've done what was asked about.
 

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Is it 'less than helpful' to have a question answered, based on others experiences of having done what the original poster also wishes to do? :) It may be difficult, but it's not impossible. :eek: The various answers have outlined that point. I suppose that it's down to the OP to weigh up those points and make a decision based on the risks, and the work involved. Nobody is wrong, or misleading, if they've done what was asked about.
Q: "Can I do this?"
A: "Yes you can"

Absent other responses, the Yes would seem to be authoritative.
The actual answer is "Maybe".

The querant needs to be apprised of all the possibilities.
 

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I've seen that exact scenario play out multiple times here.

Q: "I'm building a new system. Can I put the old drive in and it just boots up?
A: "Yes. I've done it. It worked"

2 days later...
"CRAP! It didn't work. Those guys at Toms Hardware don't know what they're talking about!"
 
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I've seen that exact scenario play out multiple times here.

Q: "I'm building a new system. Can I put the old drive in and it just boots up?
A: "Yes. I've done it. It worked"

2 days later...
"CRAP! It didn't work. Those guys at Toms Hardware don't know what they're talking about!"
In that case, A: "Yes. I've done it. It worked." was purely my own experience and was nothing to do with Toms' hardware .
 
In that case, A: "Yes. I've done it. It worked." was purely my own experience and was nothing to do with Toms' hardware .
Yes it's your experience but try to look at it from someone who is on google and do not care about you personally. They just want the information. So they do a search and find this thread. They see your "It worked" and try it. It doesn't work. Who do you think they are gonna blame in this case? You or the entire forum as "I won't go there anymore". :)
 

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Yes it's your experience but try to look at it from someone who is on google and do not care about you personally. They just want the information. So they do a search and find this thread. They see your "It worked" and try it. It doesn't work. Who do you think they are gonna blame in this case? You or the entire forum as "I won't go there anymore". :)
There's no right, wrong, guarantees, or blame in this matter. :giggle:
 

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