[SOLVED] Can I easily repair this motherboard without changing the cpu socket?

thepcgamer099

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Hi, I recently bought a returned/damaged motherboard, B450 F gaming asus strix. The plastic covering over the cpu socket has broken off, it came with half of the plastic casing but not the rest. The retention arm is usually attached to the plastic covering, and the arm arrived separately. Is it possible to buy the plastic covering and easily attach it onto the motherboard? Thanks.
Please find the images attached.
View: https://imgur.com/R9gdL86

View: https://imgur.com/EnW8YGR

View: https://imgur.com/JPxOMF2

View: https://imgur.com/OSSsKZW

View: https://imgur.com/fsJYNG9
 
Hi, I recently bought a returned/damaged motherboard, B450 F gaming asus strix.
....
If you're patient and you got the board for a good price it could be a fun salvage project. But the first thing to make sure of is none of the sockets themselves are damaged or bent out of whack. They have to be perfect as they will align behind tiny holes in the plastic cover (as you've probably seen with the scrap pieces you have). You might have to work on them a while under some magnification before taking the next step.

So, if you're ready to throw more money into this your best bet would be to buy a replacement AM4 socket....something like this...and CAREFULLY remove the cover from it to re-install onto yours.

Here's a youtube vid that may help give you some inspiration...and ideas.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g9pofp8cFAA
 
Last edited:
Reactions: punkncat
Hi, I recently bought a returned/damaged motherboard, B450 F gaming asus strix.
....
If you're patient and you got the board for a good price it could be a fun salvage project. But the first thing to make sure of is none of the sockets themselves are damaged or bent out of whack. They have to be perfect as they will align behind tiny holes in the plastic cover (as you've probably seen with the scrap pieces you have). You might have to work on them a while under some magnification before taking the next step.

So, if you're ready to throw more money into this your best bet would be to buy a replacement AM4 socket....something like this...and CAREFULLY remove the cover from it to re-install onto yours.

Here's a youtube vid that may help give you some inspiration...and ideas.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g9pofp8cFAA
 
Last edited:
Reactions: punkncat

USAFRet

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Hi, I recently bought a returned/damaged motherboard,
Generally, broken boards like this are bought as parts donors, not to "fix".

Buy 2 or 3 differently broken ones, and merge the non-broken parts into one working thing.
And only if you already have the requisite tools, skills, and experience.

Is that socket the only thing broken? Absolutely unknown.
 
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Is that socket the only thing broken? Absolutely unknown.
True enough...but then that's the fun part about cobbling together a working board out of several other donors. When you're all done and it actually works there's a very real sense of accomplishment. So long as you don't throw too much money at it, that's often reason enough.

If OP can score another AM4 dead donor board with an intact socket for less than the $10-15 for a brand-new AM4 socket off E-Bay, then by all means do that instead.
 

thepcgamer099

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If you're patient and you got the board for a good price it could be a fun salvage project. But the first thing to make sure of is none of the sockets themselves are damaged or bent out of whack. They have to be perfect as they will align behind tiny holes in the plastic cover (as you've probably seen with the scrap pieces you have). You might have to work on them a while under some magnification before taking the next step.

So, if you're ready to throw more money into this your best bet would be to buy a replacement AM4 socket....something like this...and CAREFULLY remove the cover from it to re-install onto yours.

Here's a youtube vid that may help give you some inspiration...and ideas.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g9pofp8cFAA
Hi
Yeah thats exactly what I was thinking of doing, only thing is I think the plastic is snapped for the retention arm. So lets say I could get the plastic over the cpu socket (none of the pins are damaged) would I be able to keep the cpu seated properly by placing the cpu cooler over the cpu and using that to keep it seated instead of the retention arm? Would the cpu cooler be tight enough to the cpu to keep it seated correctly or would this not work. Thanks for your help.
 

thepcgamer099

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True enough...but then that's the fun part about cobbling together a working board out of several other donors. When you're all done and it actually works there's a very real sense of accomplishment. So long as you don't throw too much money at it, that's often reason enough.

If OP can score another AM4 dead donor board with an intact socket for less than the $10-15 for a brand-new AM4 socket off E-Bay, then by all means do that instead.
My friend has bought a AM4 board that he is pretty sure is dead as well so hopefully if the socket is intact I could use this to help get one board working.
 
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So lets say I could get the plastic over the cpu socket (none of the pins are damaged) would I be able to keep the cpu seated properly by placing the cpu cooler over the cpu and using that to keep it seated instead of the retention arm? Would the cpu cooler be tight enough to the cpu to keep it seated correctly or would this not work.
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The metal arm slides the top cover with the CPU pins in the holes so the pins engage the metal 'leaves' of the socket contact. From what I can tell the arm has to basically wedge against plastic bits in the base to move the top cover as it rotates. If they (the plastic bits in the base) are broke it gets a lot more difficult without replacing the base too, and that needs a professional grade hot-air reflow station to replace.

I don't think a cooler's mounting pressure on the CPU will help push it against the contacts but it would hold it in place reliably if you can devise some other method of pushing the CPU into position. You'll have to be creative and it may not be necessary at all if there's enough left to do the wedging with a cover that's intact. Getting a cheap scrapper as a donor for a top cover makes it less of a money pit in case things can't be made to work though.
 
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Krotow

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Seems board is one of leftovers from Linus stuff droping shenanigans. Pins in CPU socket have very precise location and damage like in photos certainly skewed them away beyond repair. This motherboard now is a donor board. Except you can find someone who is eager to invest time for research what exactly is broken beside CPU socket and replace broken parts. Technically it is possible. But it will cost you at least a price of board itself. So if you aren't feel in Greta's shoes, get a new board and give/sell away this one to felow repairman for parts.
 

thepcgamer099

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The metal arm slides the top cover with the CPU pins in the holes so the pins engage the metal 'leaves' of the socket contact. From what I can tell the arm has to basically wedge against plastic bits in the base to move the top cover as it rotates. If they (the plastic bits in the base) are broke it gets a lot more difficult without replacing the base too, and that needs a professional grade hot-air reflow station to replace.

I don't think a cooler's mounting pressure on the CPU will help push it against the contacts but it would hold it in place reliably if you can devise some other method of pushing the CPU into position. You'll have to be creative and it may not be necessary at all if there's enough left to do the wedging with a cover that's intact. Getting a cheap scrapper as a donor for a top cover makes it less of a money pit in case things can't be made to work though.
Thanks, have you got any videos of anyone trying to repair this kind of thing at all to help me attempt to fix it. Thanks for your help.
 
Thanks, have you got any videos of anyone trying to repair this kind of thing at all to help me attempt to fix it. Thanks for your help.
Other than the one I posted earlier, no I don't. It's not all that common and most people who come across this sort of problem just do what the others have suggested and bin the board. If you like to work with tools and like a challange i think it's worth a try since I don't see a need for anything more exotic than a jewelers loupe or lighted head band magnifier. And of course, only if you get the bits you need cheap.

There are also some videos in youtube of people repairing AM3 and AM2 sockets. They may work similar, but beware and look for differences in operation. Just search on youtube, it's easy. If the channel is still active you might even be able to contact the poster and get advice from them.
 
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thepcgamer099

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Other than the one I posted earlier, no I don't. It's not all that common and most people who come across this sort of problem just do what the others have suggested and bin the board. If you like to work with tools and like a challange i think it's worth a try since I don't see a need for anything more exotic than a jewelers loupe or lighted head band magnifier. And of course, only if you get the bits you need cheap.

There are also some videos in youtube of people repairing AM3 and AM2 sockets. They may work similar, but beware and look for differences in operation. Just search on youtube, it's easy. If the channel is still active you might even be able to contact the poster and get advice from them.
Okay I'll have a look thanks.
 

thepcgamer099

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That board belongs in the trash. There is no way in the world any normal end user could fix that.
I managed to fix the board simply by buying a new AM4 socket and carefully removing the cover and fitting it onto the board. The new AM4 socket cost £6 and I did not need any specialist kit or even a magnifying glass. The motherboard works fine just as normal.
 

Rogue Leader

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I managed to fix the board simply by buying a new AM4 socket and carefully removing the cover and fitting it onto the board. The new AM4 socket cost £6 and I did not need any specialist kit or even a magnifying glass. The motherboard works fine just as normal.
Impressed, but you got lucky that was the extent of the damage. That is not always the case and I'd be interested to see if this is stable long term. I guess time will tell.
 

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