Can I join these two graphic cards using SLI/Crossfire?

Raymond Zoliansanga

Commendable
Sep 14, 2016
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Dear Wise people of Tom's Hardware,

I'm not a computer expert nor an avid gamer. I use my computer to work and play some (really outdated) games. So, I thought maybe I should upgrade the RAM and GPU and play some decent games for a change.

Then, a little question popped into my head. Is it possible to combine two GPUs?
I know that there is a thing called SLI/Crossfire (and that's all I know), and I'm pretty sure my Motherboard (don't know what name or brand it is) doesn't support it. But let's suppose it did, would it be possible to combine my current AMD Radeon and the (being shipped right now) NVIDIA GeForce?

Here is my current spec just for reference:

Core i3 processor (2012 model)
4GB DDR3 RAM
AMD Radeon HD 6570 1GB (....outdated, I know)


Upgrades:

Kingston 4gb HyperX Fury 1866mhz
NVIDIA GeForce GT 730 2GB DDR5

What do you guys think? I'm a caveman when it comes to advanced stuff like this :p

 

Kevern_11

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Dec 16, 2015
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No you cannot, the RAM upgrade will be a good idea though. the 730 is NVIDIA brand while the 6570 is AMD brand. AMD uses crossfire while NVIDIA uses SLI. You need two of the same type of card in order to either SLI or crossfire. The only exception I can think of is that some AMD cards can crossfire with APU's, but you do not have an APU.
 

Raymond Zoliansanga

Commendable
Sep 14, 2016
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Thank you both for answering. I guess one GPU will have to do then. Thank you again for your time.
 

Sanctum Nihil

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Nov 24, 2013
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Kevern's post was a great response but you may be interested if I expanded on it a bit: Adding more RAM is an excellent idea, 4gb is nothing now; you'd probably be ok with 8, but I recommend 16gb. You can also make that PC quite relevant by checking what socket your i3 is by installing CPU-Z and googling your CPUs exact model. If it's an LGA11XX style socket, then you can just replace your i3 with an older i5 or i7 that uses the same one (since you said your CPU is circa ~2012, they'll probably be of the Ivy Bridge line). You could easily get a few more years of modern gaming out of that PC if you are willing to invest a little.
 
I might add that unless you need some special feature of the GT 730, don't bother replacing your GPU. The GT 730 isn't going to help you game any better. Save your money for a more meaningful upgrade if gaming performance is what you want.
 

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