[SOLVED] Can I prevent rust on hinges using WD-40?

Myronazz

Commendable
Sep 5, 2016
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Hello,

So... Basically, I found a laptop in the basement that was sitting there for about four years. The basement wasn't the best environment as there was high humidity and a lot of debree from some machinery and so because of that, the laptop suffered a lot but I'll spare you the unneeded details.

The biggest problem were the hinges, they rusted so bad they wouldn't move so I thought why not dip them in 6% acidic vinegar and sure enough, it worked. Rust is gone and hinges turn smoothly again but it seems the metal gained a weird black texture which doesn't affect how the hinges turn, so I guess it's fine...?

Well, how can I prevent them from rusting again? Should I use WD-40 on them? Else what do you suggest?
 

britechguy

Prominent
Jul 2, 2019
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WD40 is a great thing for this, but, it will require frequent reapplications as it's prone to (and intended to, over time) evaporate.

I'd actually consider something like dielectric grease or electrically conductive grease (not that you need that feature here). Dielectric grease is available in small tubes at any auto parts store and you can find things like OX-Gard, or similar, online or at Lowes.

You might want to WD40 the hinges first, clean off all of the excess from the surface, then wait a day or so and apply a thin, and I do mean thin (probably with a cheap kids paint brush or a cotton swab) coat of dielectric grease. This should seal out water/humidity quite well for a very long time.
 

Kirill Steshin

Honorable
May 17, 2014
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As long as you won't spray on PCB board or any contacts (during maintenance or use) - you're good. Go for Gel Lubricant or Resistant Silicone Lubricant. Do not over-spray.
 

Myronazz

Commendable
Sep 5, 2016
205
3
1,695
3
WD40 is a great thing for this, but, it will require frequent reapplications as it's prone to (and intended to, over time) evaporate.

I'd actually consider something like dielectric grease or electrically conductive grease (not that you need that feature here). Dielectric grease is available in small tubes at any auto parts store and you can find things like OX-Gard, or similar, online or at Lowes.

You might want to WD40 the hinges first, clean off all of the excess from the surface, then wait a day or so and apply a thin, and I do mean thin (probably with a cheap kids paint brush or a cotton swab) coat of dielectric grease. This should seal out water/humidity quite well for a very long time.
Good point, taking the hinges out on that laptop is the biggest pain in the neck. I should use some more of a permanent solution. Thank you.
 

Myronazz

Commendable
Sep 5, 2016
205
3
1,695
3
WD40 is a great thing for this, but, it will require frequent reapplications as it's prone to (and intended to, over time) evaporate.

I'd actually consider something like dielectric grease or electrically conductive grease (not that you need that feature here). Dielectric grease is available in small tubes at any auto parts store and you can find things like OX-Gard, or similar, online or at Lowes.

You might want to WD40 the hinges first, clean off all of the excess from the surface, then wait a day or so and apply a thin, and I do mean thin (probably with a cheap kids paint brush or a cotton swab) coat of dielectric grease. This should seal out water/humidity quite well for a very long time.
Well... I couldn't actually find any dielectric grease. I went to a couple of stores and the only thing I found was lithium white grease. Guess finding grease in Greece isn't easy haha.

Should I use the one I found? Good enough or nah? The guy said it is intended to last a long time, unlike WD-40.
 

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