[SOLVED] Can I Upgrade Graphics Card???

Sep 7, 2019
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IdeaCenter 510 A- IKL

Processor:
7th Generation Intel® Core™ i7-7700 Processor (3.60GHz 8MB)
Operating System: Windows 10 Home 64
Memory: 16.0GB DDR4 UDIMM 2400MHz
Hard Drive: 2TB 7200 RPM
Graphics: Intel® HD Graphics 630

I cannot find anything online that I can understand. One thing i've picked up on is that it's not something easily upgraded . I want to be able to play games other WarThunder bc that's just about all that works. Everything else, and I mean everything else is unplayable. Please help me to understand if I can even upgrade my Graphics Card
 
Since you are upgrading a prebuilt, your PSU is unlikely to have 6 or 6+2 pin connectors. Only lower power cards without the need for any extra connectors will work.
Like I said, it's going to need a heftier PSU anyway for the level of GPUs he's looking at and can afford. The stock PSU on those rigs is only 180-210 watt depending on exact build spec.

The mention of 6+2 pin plugs was to let him know what newer, more game ready PSUs have, as I strongly am urging him to go that route.

A 1030 would work, but it's so underwhelming for gaming, and his CPU is easily capable of handling a much better one. Plus, as I said, he can easily afford it with a budget of around $300.
 
Sep 7, 2019
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stick with 1 thread
IdeaCenter 510 A- IKL

Processor:
7th Generation Intel® Core™ i7-7700 Processor (3.60GHz 8MB)
Operating System: Windows 10 Home 64
Memory: 16.0GB DDR4 UDIMM 2400MHz
Hard Drive: 2TB 7200 RPM
Graphics: Intel® HD Graphics 630

I cannot find anything online that I can understand. One thing i've picked up on is that it's not something easily upgraded . I want to be able to play games other WarThunder bc that's just about all that works. Everything else, and I mean everything else is unplayable and laggy. Sorely disappointed in this computers gaming performance, and yes I realize it wasn't built for gaming, but expected out of all the options I selected. Please help me to understand if I can even upgrade my Graphics Card or make this PC able to play a few more games?
 

COLGeek

Cybernaut
Moderator
Looks like you can install a video card and improve performance. Your PSU is too under powered for most gaming GPUs, but something like a GTX 750/750 Ti, GTX 1050/1050 Ti, or GTX 1650 would work. You would need a low-profile variant as well, I believe.

What is your budget for such an upgrade?
 
Reactions: Fencepost22
Sep 7, 2019
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Yes, that PC can have the GPU upgraded.

Open the tower and see what PSU it has.
Thank you for responding
Looks like you can install a video card and improve performance. Your PSU is too under powered for most gaming GPUs, but something like a GTX 750/750 Ti, GTX 1050/1050 Ti, or GTX 1650 would work. You would need a low-profile variant as well, I believe.

What is your budget for such an upgrade?
Wow Thank you for responding! Umm I suppose $300??? but I was even thinking about buying a more gaming compatible PC, if the upgrade for my current one would be too complicated
 
Sep 7, 2019
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Looks like you can install a video card and improve performance. Your PSU is too under powered for most gaming GPUs, but something like a GTX 750/750 Ti, GTX 1050/1050 Ti, or GTX 1650 would work. You would need a low-profile variant as well, I believe.

What is your budget for such an upgrade?
I can spend upwards of $300. But obviously i'd like to keep at good price and go with the simplest route, even if that means buying a more gaming compatable system. But I haven't had my PC too long and i'd prefer just to upgrade since I believe it has some good hardware... besides the graphics ccard
 

COLGeek

Cybernaut
Moderator
I can spend upwards of $300. But obviously i'd like to keep at good price and go with the simplest route, even if that means buying a more gaming compatable system. But I haven't had my PC too long and i'd prefer just to upgrade since I believe it has some good hardware... besides the graphics ccard
I posted a recommend above. Should improve performance quite a bit and doesn't require a new PSU.
 
Reactions: Fencepost22

COLGeek

Cybernaut
Moderator
It is very straight forward. It will go into a PCIe x16 slot and will only go in one way. You have to remove the two dust covers over the rear case slots, but that too is easy.

Once installed, you need to install the latest drivers from Nvidia (of course you connect your monitor to the GTX and not to one of the video ports on the motherboard). At that point, you game on!
 
Reactions: Fencepost22
If your budget is $300, definitely get both a GPU and an adequate PSU. The stock PSU in those rigs is very low power (180-210 watt). Anything over a 1030 GPU will start taxing it.

This is a similar situation taken straight from the Lenovo forums...
https://forums.lenovo.com/t5/Lenovo-Desktop-Towers/IdeaCentre-510A-15abr-Graphics-Card/td-p/3894551

This is just one example of what you could get, and for about $260.

https://www.newegg.com/evga-geforce-gtx-1660-06g-p4-1067-kr/p/N82E16814487448?Item=N82E16814487448&Description=1660&cm_re=1660-_-14-487-448-_-Product

https://www.newegg.com/evga-500-gd-100-gd-0500-v1-500w/p/N82E16817438158?Item=N82E16817438158

You won't have any problems playing games on a 1660.
https://www.techpowerup.com/review/msi-geforce-gtx-1660-gaming-x/

If I were you, I would take the $40 left, and save a bit more, then get a roomier case. The cases for those cheap non gaming rigs are pretty lackluster when it comes to room and ventilation.

Here's a pretty decent case for just $54.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B074PTNZ7F/?tag=thowisguy-20&th=1
 
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Reactions: Fencepost22
Sep 7, 2019
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It is very straight forward. It will go into a PCIe x16 slot and will only go in one way. You have to remove the two dust covers over the rear case slots, but that too is easy.

Once installed, you need to install the latest drivers from Nvidia (of course you connect your monitor to the GTX and not to one of the video ports on the motherboard). At that point, you game on!
Alright! thank you that is extremely helpful. Which one of the graphics cards would you recommend?
 
Sep 7, 2019
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If your budget is $300, definitely get both a GPU and an adequate PSU. The stock PSU in those rigs is very low power. Anything over a 1030 GPU will start taxing it.

This is a similar situation taken straight from the Lenovo forums...
https://forums.lenovo.com/t5/Lenovo-Desktop-Towers/IdeaCentre-510A-15abr-Graphics-Card/td-p/3894551
Thank you! Yes I ran across that thread but didn't quiet understand it. Is Upgrading PSU fairly straight forward? Or should I enlist some help from a computer store?
 
Thank you! Yes I ran across that thread but didn't quiet understand it. Is Upgrading PSU fairly straight forward? Or should I enlist some help from a computer store?
I would do it yourself. The mounting of the PSU in most of today's PC cases is pretty easy because it sits on the bottom/back of the case. It is merely held in by 4 screws put in from the back. That said, look at my post you replied to again. I added in a GPU, PSU, and Case. It all comes to $314 after rebates, but all are well worth it.

The biggest task of swapping out a PSU is disconnecting and reconnecting all the PSU cables, but there are some pretty good YouTube videos showing how to do that. It can help when doing so to know the brand and model of your MB. The reason being is the MB is pretty much the hub of most connections on a PC, and it's manual, which you can access online via a pdf, will show in much better detail than the below Lenovo example, just how to do that.

Some good learning lessons on a first time PSU swap is 1, label ALL plugs/sockets with masking tape writing a matching letter/number, then look at the new PSU and mark the same plugs similarly. 2, take note of the cables plug lengths on each cable, and plan their placement accordingly. 3, make SURE you look carefully at the plug design, most have little locking tabs you'll need to push down on their back end to unhook their hooked tabs. It's sort of a rocker type design whereby squeezing on the back rocks the hook up. If they don't pull out easily, DO NOT force them. Instead, while squeezing them to free the hooks, wiggle them slightly, while pulling gently.

4, before plugging in the new PSU, take note of the shape of each little hole of the connectivity end of the plugs. They are rounded on one side, flat on the other. They only fit one way. In this regard to a degree they are "fool proof", but problems can happen if you try to force the plug on if it's the wrong way around. Also, take note first of whether the little metal pins inside each little hole of the connectivity end of the plug is well centered and not pulled out too far. They can fail to align and get damaged if not. Tweezers, a small screwdriver, or even an extended large paper clip can be handy tools to align them.

5, neatness counts not only for looks, but for air flow and cooling, AND making cleaning the inside of the PC easier. Most cases have a small space behind the MB for routing and stashing excess cable. On the front side of a MB, you should only see the plug and a little cable coming through from the back of the MB. It's kind of an art to get this aspect of connectivity nailed, but one that pays to learn and master. The case I listed above will no doubt be much easier to deal with regarding cable management.

The plug that is most likely to be a bear to get out is the main 24 pin cable going to the MB. It's hard to mistake because it's by far the biggest one. Also, DO NOT forget to attach the 8 pin cable at the top of the MB, it's for the CPU. If you examine and label your plugs carefully though, this shouldn't be a problem. Pretty much all PSU plugs are now labeled too btw. PCI-E means a GPU plug, SATA means a drive power plug, etc. The drives will also need a data cable, but your rig will already have those. Just examine how they're connected if swapping the case.

Lastly, one of the more confusing bits on a first time case swap is attaching the case's front panel cables to the MB. These cables are small strands and always mount to the bottom of the MB. Most well known name brand MBs now have an easy multi connector piece, whereby you can just plug in each strand to it, then connect it to the MB pins. This is so you can more easily see and reach it before plugging it in. The strands and connector piece (and MB if you don't have a connector) are all pre labeled. That said, even though they're prelabled, examine they're current connectivity carefully, and make sure you plug in the front panel cables for the new case the same way.

Conversely, this is the pdf of the Lenovo 310A/510A maintenance guide, which covers how to replace components, even MB. The instructions are a bit vague though.
https://cdn.cnetcontent.com/syndication/mediaserver/inlinecontent/all/964/00a/96400af1e763fbd85e56ef7f08578f6c/original.pdf
 
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Sep 7, 2019
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I would do it yourself. The mounting of the PSU in most of today's PC cases is pretty easy because it sits on the bottom/back of the case. It is merely held in by 4 screws put in from the back. That said, look at my post you replied to again. I added in a GPU, PUS, and case. It all comes to $314 after rebates, but all are well worth it.

The biggest task of swapping out a PSU is disconnecting and reconnecting all the PSU cables, but there are some pretty good YouTube videos showing how to do that. It can help when doing so to know the brand and model of your MB. The reason being is the MB is pretty much the hub of most connections on a PC, and it's manual, which you can access online via a pdf, will show in much better detail than the below example, just how to do that.

Conversely, this is the pdf of the Lenovo 310A/510A maintenance guide, which covers how to replace components, even MB. The instructions are a bit vague though.
https://cdn.cnetcontent.com/syndication/mediaserver/inlinecontent/all/964/00a/96400af1e763fbd85e56ef7f08578f6c/original.pdf
Wow thank you! That is very helpful. I saw a few threads stating something about the pin size, like the plug in port for GPU on my PC only being a 16 pin? If that doesn’t make sense then never mind
 
Wow thank you! That is very helpful. I saw a few threads stating something about the pin size, like the plug in port for GPU on my PC only being a 16 pin? If that doesn’t make sense then never mind
Sockets/plugs for GPUs are generally 6 pin or 8 pin. Most PSUs now have 6+2 pin plugs, meaning they can be used either way. There are GPUs that take two 6 pin, or two 8 pin, or some times a 6 and a 8. There's no actual 16 pin plugs or sockets though.

This is what a 6+2 pin plug looks like...

 
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Since you are upgrading a prebuilt, your PSU is unlikely to have 6 or 6+2 pin connectors. Only lower power cards without the need for any extra connectors will work.
Like I said, it's going to need a heftier PSU anyway for the level of GPUs he's looking at and can afford. The stock PSU on those rigs is only 180-210 watt depending on exact build spec.

The mention of 6+2 pin plugs was to let him know what newer, more game ready PSUs have, as I strongly am urging him to go that route.

A 1030 would work, but it's so underwhelming for gaming, and his CPU is easily capable of handling a much better one. Plus, as I said, he can easily afford it with a budget of around $300.
 

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