[SOLVED] Can I use 64 GB RAM kit (32x2) on Z170-P motherboard?

STRONG_SMASH

Honorable
Nov 26, 2015
13
0
10,510
0
Hello there!

I have purchased 64 GB (32x2) RAM kit by Kingston, part number KF436C18BBAK2/64, specification: KF436C18BBAK2_64 (kingston.com) for my MB, Asus Z170-P ATX LGA1151 Motherboard, manual: E12045_Z170-P_UM_V3_WEB.pdf (asus.com).

At the first glance I thought everything will be good and there will be no compatibility problems, you can see in the MB manual specification: "Memory: 4 x DIMM, maximum 64 GB...". But after closer inspection it also says on the page 1-7 in the "Memory configuration" "You may install 2 GB, 4 GB, 8 GB and 16 GB unbuffered non-ECC DDR4 DIMMs into the DIMM sockets.". As you may notice it does not say anything about 32 GB modules.

It also says on the page 1-8 "According to Intel CPU specs, DIMM voltage below 1.35V is recommended to protect the CPU." And my new RAM modules run exactly at 1.35V.

This raises the questions: can I install and use those RAM modules on this older MB at all? Perhaps 32 GB modules was not common back then when Z170-P was released and this is why they not mentioned? Or they will not work at all?

And second question: Will 1.35V voltage be dangerous to run on this particular MB? Because manual says "below 1.35V" not even "at maximum at 1.35V".

Thank you!
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
32 GB modules was not common back then when Z170-P
No it wasn't. The highest was 16GB's per stick and only a handful of brands made them in limited SKU's.

The maximum memory support for the platform you're asking about is 64GB's. Since there's 4 slots you divide that number by 4 which is how end up 16GB sticks per slot to come to 64GB. In theory you can drop in the sticks of ram on the board, slots A2 and B2 but the results can vary between instability or no POST or limited speeds on the rams. Running higher capacity sticks could be achieved by running them at lower clocks(as opposed to running them at their advertised speeds). You could also try and make sure you're on the latest BIOS version prior to testing the ram out on the board.

Also, for the sake of relevance, you're advised to ask first then go buy, not the other way around.
 
Reactions: STRONG_SMASH

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
32 GB modules was not common back then when Z170-P
No it wasn't. The highest was 16GB's per stick and only a handful of brands made them in limited SKU's.

The maximum memory support for the platform you're asking about is 64GB's. Since there's 4 slots you divide that number by 4 which is how end up 16GB sticks per slot to come to 64GB. In theory you can drop in the sticks of ram on the board, slots A2 and B2 but the results can vary between instability or no POST or limited speeds on the rams. Running higher capacity sticks could be achieved by running them at lower clocks(as opposed to running them at their advertised speeds). You could also try and make sure you're on the latest BIOS version prior to testing the ram out on the board.

Also, for the sake of relevance, you're advised to ask first then go buy, not the other way around.
 
Reactions: STRONG_SMASH

STRONG_SMASH

Honorable
Nov 26, 2015
13
0
10,510
0
32 GB modules was not common back then when Z170-P
No it wasn't. The highest was 16GB's per stick and only a handful of brands made them in limited SKU's.

The maximum memory support for the platform you're asking about is 64GB's. Since there's 4 slots you divide that number by 4 which is how end up 16GB sticks per slot to come to 64GB. In theory you can drop in the sticks of ram on the board, slots A2 and B2 but the results can vary between instability or no POST or limited speeds on the rams. Running higher capacity sticks could be achieved by running them at lower clocks(as opposed to running them at their advertised speeds). You could also try and make sure you're on the latest BIOS version prior to testing the ram out on the board.

Also, for the sake of relevance, you're advised to ask first then go buy, not the other way around.
Thank you for answer. So if I understand you correctly, this is the things i can do:

  1. Update BIOS to latest
  2. Run RAM at lower speed
And even then it is possible I will experience negative effects such as:

  1. Instability
  2. "no POST" (PC won't run if I understand the meaning)
  3. Limited speed of the RAM
Do I understand you correctly?


If I experiment and try to run those RAM modules, and It will not work, can this experiment "break" the components permanently? RAM, MB, CPU? I'm not and expert in those things, so sorry if this is a stupid question.
 

geofelt

Titan
As above, it is better to ask BEFORE you buy.

Looked at the ram qvl support list for your motherboard:
https://dlcdnets.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/LGA1151/Z170-K/Z170_DDR4_4DIMM_memory_QVL_report_201712.pdf
It would seem that the only 64gb ram kits are 4 x 16gb kits.

I think you could safely try to install the two sticks.
The default speed will run at the safe 1.2v. Likely, 2133.
Your ram is capable of 3600 speed, but only at 1.35v .
Past that, the max xpeed supported is 3200 speed from large kits.
I would also expect to see only 16gb used from each stick.

Whatever you get,
Run memtest86 or memtest86+
They boot from a usb stick and do not use windows.
You can download them here:
If you can run a full pass with NO errors, your ram should be ok.

Running several more passes will sometimes uncover an issue, but it takes more time.
Probably not worth it unless you really suspect a ram issue.

Considering that you bought expensive ram that at best you can only use half the capacity and less than the speed, I would return it in favor of a supported kit that should cost half of what you paid.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS