Question Can I use a 6 pin cable for a 6+2 power supply?

Dec 13, 2020
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I have a Corsair 750 Watt CX750F power supply unit, it seems like it has four PCIE/CPU ports. And mygraphics card requires 6 pin+8 pin power supply.
I know I can use two 6+2-pin PCIe connectors for the GPU, but for the 6 pin port of the GPU, I need to leave the 2 pin dangling, it just looks ugly...
So I would like to ask, instead of two 6+2-pin PCIe connectors, can I just use a 6 pin cable and a 8 pin cable for my PSU?
 
If it is like my old cx550m, the pcie cable will have one end with a solid 8 pin connector and the other end will have 2 6+2 pin connectors.

Put the solid 8 pin into one of the "pcie" ports on the psu.

Plug one of the 6+2 into your gpu and then plug one of the 6 pins into the gpu without the +2 pins.

I don't know what you mean by just a 6 pin cable, they should all be 6+2
 
Dec 13, 2020
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If it is like my old cx550m, the pcie cable will have one end with a solid 8 pin connector and the other end will have 2 6+2 pin connectors.

Put the solid 8 pin into one of the "pcie" ports on the psu.

Plug one of the 6+2 into your gpu and then plug one of the 6 pins into the gpu without the +2 pins.

I don't know what you mean by just a 6 pin cable, they should all be 6+2
Instead of the 6+2 pin connectors, there are also 6 pin PCIE cables, like Silverstone PP07-IDE6R 6pin to PCIe 6pin Extension Cable, my plan was using that one instead of the 6+2 pin connector. Just dont know if it works or not:ROFLMAO:
 
I have a Corsair 750 Watt CX750F power supply unit, it seems like it has four PCIE/CPU ports. And mygraphics card requires 6 pin+8 pin power supply.
I know I can use two 6+2-pin PCIe connectors for the GPU, but for the 6 pin port of the GPU, I need to leave the 2 pin dangling, it just looks ugly...
So I would like to ask, instead of two 6+2-pin PCIe connectors, can I just use a 6 pin cable and a 8 pin cable for my PSU?
99% of people would just zip tie the extra two-pins out of sight. You really can't do that?

An alternative is to get a pin extraction tool: https://www.amazon.com/Adduswin-Terminals-Extractor-Electrical-Connectors/dp/B07H7J9XHP/

You pop the +2-pin out of where it's daisy chained into the first connector. You cut the wires close to the pin then you put the pin back into the connector.
 

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I have a Corsair 750 Watt CX750F power supply unit, it seems like it has four PCIE/CPU ports. And mygraphics card requires 6 pin+8 pin power supply.
I know I can use two 6+2-pin PCIe connectors for the GPU, but for the 6 pin port of the GPU, I need to leave the 2 pin dangling, it just looks ugly...
So I would like to ask, instead of two 6+2-pin PCIe connectors, can I just use a 6 pin cable and a 8 pin cable for my PSU?
Why not reverse this by using a 6+2 and the 6 pin, and then using heat shrink to hide the extra "+2"? Even if you get away with operating on only 6 pins for the 6+2 (and I don't know that you can get away with it), then under heavier loads I'd still expect it to be unstable.
 
Dec 13, 2020
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99% of people would just zip tie the extra two-pins out of sight. You really can't do that?

An alternative is to get a pin extraction tool: https://www.amazon.com/Adduswin-Terminals-Extractor-Electrical-Connectors/dp/B07H7J9XHP/

You pop the +2-pin out of where it's daisy chained into the first connector. You cut the wires close to the pin then you put the pin back into the connector.
I think 99% of people do that just because they have to. Several years ago, 99% of people also used PSUs without any RGB.
Sorry, maybe I am one of the 1%, I just want to make it perfect, make it cool.
 
I think 99% of people do that just because they have to. Several years ago, 99% of people also used PSUs without any RGB.
Sorry, maybe I am one of the 1%, I just want to make it perfect, make it cool.
I'm very OCD and anal retentive. I wouldn't be happy if I could see the +2 dangling. So your point isn't taken.

I actually assumed that you just didn't know about "zip ties". I mean, if you have to ask. Like I sad, if you're really wanting to get rid of the +2, why not pop the pin and cut the +2 off. It's such an in your face solution.

No offense. Maybe you just didn't think about it. I'm just jaded because there's so many people in these forums that shouldn't even be touching a PC, never mind building one.
 
Dec 13, 2020
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Why not reverse this by using a 6+2 and the 6 pin, and then using heat shrink to hide the extra "+2"? Even if you get away with operating on only 6 pins for the 6+2 (and I don't know that you can get away with it), then under heavier loads I'd still expect it to be unstable.
That was my plan before, but some say there are only 212V in the 6 pin connectors, and some say there are 312V in the 8 pin connectors, so I was confused if I could do that or not:tearsofjoy:
But I think it worths a try😀
 
That was my plan before, but some say there are only 212V in the 6 pin connectors, and some say there are 312V in the 8 pin connectors, so I was confused if I could do that or not:tearsofjoy:
But I think it worths a try😀
So.. See... You're getting bad advice.

Six pin PCIe is 3x +12V and 3x ground. The +2 on an 8-pin PCIe are two ground pins. Pop out the two pins that jump over to the +2, cut the wire close to the pin, reinstall the pins. Easy peasy.
 
Dec 13, 2020
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I'm very OCD and anal retentive. I wouldn't be happy if I could see the +2 dangling. So your point isn't taken.

I actually assumed that you just didn't know about "zip ties". I mean, if you have to ask. Like I sad, if you're really wanting to get rid of the +2, why not pop the pin and cut the +2 off. It's such an in your face solution.

No offense. Maybe you just didn't think about it. I'm just jaded because there's so many people in these forums that shouldn't even be touching a PC, never mind building one.
Come on :tearsofjoy: Cutting the +2 off will just makes me feel more uncomfortable. So your point isn't taken either.
Maybe I should just build a PSU with a 6pin and a 8pin PCIE port to prove I am thinking about it, so that I can stay in this forum and build a PC.
I am sorry to make you feel unhappy, as I said in the title, I just want to ask if I could use a 6 pin connector for a 6+2 PSU or not, that's all:joycat:
If I can use the 6 pin, it is just good, it will look clean and neat. If it does not work, that is ok, maybe I can just use the powerlink from EVGA, or purchase an individually Sleeved 6+2pin PCIe cable, and hidden the 2pin behind the chassis.
Just take it easy plz.
 
Dec 13, 2020
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Yeah. That's why they've sold all but a dozen of those things. They don't work in a lot of cards.

I know because they're made by HEC and EVGA only placed one order for them.
Nobody says I have to attach the EVGA powerlink to the GPU right? I can hidden it behind the chassis😊😊😊 And transfer 8+8 to 6+8:sneaky:
 
Dec 13, 2020
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So.. See... You're getting bad advice.

Six pin PCIe is 3x +12V and 3x ground. The +2 on an 8-pin PCIe are two ground pins. Pop out the two pins that jump over to the +2, cut the wire close to the pin, reinstall the pins. Easy peasy.
So if the extra 2 pin are just grounded, why couldn't I just use a 6 pin connector? I am just curious about it:unsure:
So now the answer is I can not use a 6 pin for the 6+2 PSU, rihgt?
 
So if the extra 2 pin are just grounded, why couldn't I just use a 6 pin connector? I am just curious about it:unsure:
So now the answer is I can not use a 6 pin for the 6+2 PSU, rihgt?
Because they're "sense" pins. They allow the graphics card to know that a newer, more capable PSU is in use. If you don't have the two pins populated, odds are the card will not POST because it will assume you have an old, janky PSU.

An 8-pin PCIe connector doesn't actually deliver more power. Even a 6-pin can easily deliver 150W. But IF the PSU manufacturer is following spec, then using the 8-pin points to precautions being taken like using at least 18g wire and not having an OCP that will trip if there's a 300W load on the cable.
 
Dec 13, 2020
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Because they're "sense" pins. They allow the graphics card to know that a newer, more capable PSU is in use. If you don't have the two pins populated, odds are the card will not POST because it will assume you have an old, janky PSU.

An 8-pin PCIe connector doesn't actually deliver more power. Even a 6-pin can easily deliver 150W. But IF the PSU manufacturer is following spec, then using the 8-pin points to precautions being taken like using at least 18g wire and not having an OCP that will trip if there's a 300W load on the cable.
I see 😢 because the GPU requires one 8 pin and one 6 pin, so I thought I only need one 8 pin connectors for the "sense" pins, and I can use a 6 pin cable as the other one. It seems like I was wrong. I will just buy two individually Sleeved 6+2pin PCIe cables then :cryingcat:Thank you very much.
 
I see 😢 because the GPU requires one 8 pin and one 6 pin, so I thought I only need one 8 pin connectors for the "sense" pins, and I can use a 6 pin cable as the other one. It seems like I was wrong. I will just buy two individually Sleeved 6+2pin PCIe cables then :cryingcat:Thank you very much.
You can still do this without buying new cables.

You do only need one 8-pin for the sense. The 6-pin has no sense wires. So you plug in the first connector as an 8-pin and remove the +2 from the second connector.
 
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Instead of the 6+2 pin connectors, there are also 6 pin PCIE cables, like Silverstone PP07-IDE6R 6pin to PCIe 6pin Extension Cable, my plan was using that one instead of the 6+2 pin connector. Just dont know if it works or not:ROFLMAO:
No. Extensions are horrible. I mean.. I use a few, but they are a very precise length. They're not used for aesthetics alone and are no longer than they need to be.

😢 My PC case has a window, so it really matters for me, but anyway, if it does not work, I will just use the 6+2 pin connectors:cryingcat:
Most cases do have windows. I have to ask... have you TRIED building this PC as-is and are seeing these issues or are you assuming they're going to be issues?
 
Dec 13, 2020
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You can still do this without buying new cables.

You do only need one 8-pin for the sense. The 6-pin has no sense wires. So you plug in the first connector as an 8-pin and remove the +2 from the second connector.
Ok, I was trying to make the story shorter, but since we have the expert here, I will go with more details.
I know I can use the 6+2pin (Dual Connector) PCIe cable, one 6+2 pin for the 8pin port of the GPU, and one 6 pin(without 2 pin) for the 6pin port of the GPU.
But I just prefer to use two 6+2pin PCIe (Single Connector) cables, so the GPU will be powered from two different PCIE/CPU port from the PSU.
I know there will be no difference, but I heard that it is recommended that the GPU should be powered with two seperated cables.
This is the reason why I was thinking about using one 6 pin cable and one 8 pin cable.
Now as you said, since I can not use the 6 pin cable directly to the PSU, I am thinking about connecting the 6+2pin (Dual Connector) PCIe cable to PSU, and use one 6pin to 6pin extension cable and one 8pin to 8pin extension cable to conncect the GPU with the 6+2pin (Dual Connector) PCIe cable.

Actually, the motherboard also requires a 8+4 pin power supply, but I can not find a 4 pin connector for the CPU, so I decided just conncet 8 pin to the motherboard. I know I can just use 4pin of the 4+4 connector, but scince I will not overclock the cpu too hard, I will just use a 8pin connector.

I just really don't want to remain any pins unplugged, and I think the problem is solved now. (PSU) to ( 6+2pin dual connector PCIe cable) to (6 pin extension cable and 8 pin extension cable) to (GPU). As long as I hidden the 6+2pin dual connector PCIe cable behind the chassis, I think it will look good.
 

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