Question Can i use a rx560 4gb thats pci powered in my mobo thats already running a rx550 2g

Jun 8, 2019
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i have a hp gaming rig i updgraded it a bit specs are ryzen 2400g 16 gb corsair vengance 3ghz dual channel and a rx550 and i also added a 240 g ssd for my games i main ..i want to upgrade my gpu today i have a extra 110 bucks and i can get a rx560 4b today i have a 320 watt psu im thinkin ill b fine the rx560 says recomended 400 watt psu but i honestly dont have much power running i would think seeing 65watts for my ryzen 5 and 50 with my rx550 current i dont see why i couldnt run the 560 when i does run on pcie ?? thoughts
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
Hmm, bit of a mess to have 3 GPUs.

Honestly, the 2400G's Vega 11 (11 CUs, vs the 10CUs of the RX550) might have been faster than an RX550, though I suppose it would come down to sustainable clock speed and memory speed. RX560 isn't a huge improvement either.

You could certainly run it, but I would say hold off until you can afford an RX570, that is three times the GPU vs about 40% improvement.
 
Jul 30, 2019
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can you tell me more about their hardware, for example, which manufacturer and which chipset does the board have.

Theoretically, you can use the Vega APU graphics and the RX cards at the same time. the drivers are the same. and so you could hook up a main monitor to the motherboard and run with the Vega11 APU chips, and everything else from 2-4 more monitors or VR devices via the graphics card / cards on the PCI-E3.0x16 or to 2 PCI-E 3.0 ports as 2-way Crossfire composite (x8X8) HDMI or display ports operate ..

The faster Rx560 always matches the slower performance of the RX550 2GB. No matter if it is installed on PCI-E port 1 or 2. in a RX550 and a RX560 you can do that already .. since work with 128bit cards .. with a 550/560 128bit card and a RX570 4GB would run extremely slowed down as the RX570 delivers 256bit and so the bitrate to about 50 % would be reduced and the remaining GPU performance would fall on RX560 or 550 power level.

In addition, the power supply is much too weak for that .... even for a single RX560 / 570 card in their system

Let's put it up, they have one

Ryzen 5 APU AMD should work with a maximum of 65 watts ... The question is whether this value was determined with or without Vega 11 GPU use or not. If we still have 5-10% overclocking we quickly get to 75-95 watts

Mainboard with accessories (M.2 SSD, other Sata drives (SSD, HDD, BR / DVD) fan, CPU watercooling complete set or custom water cooling with pumps and RGB lights (Bullshit) and USB devices (External HDD / USB3.0 or 2.0 are synonymous to the 50-100 watts depending on what is still connected.


plus the graphics card / cards

the RX550 and the RX560 with 2GB GDDR5 are at 75-85 watts with 4GB GDDR5 it can be 85-125 watts when turned on the card for benchmarking or overclocking is all on the card.

a MSI Radeon RX 570 ARMOR 8G OC draws at least 150 watts at normal settings and a monitor 175-200 watts in OC mode and more than 200 watts when playing on 3 Full HD monitors in a resolution of 5760x1080 at 60Hz or more up to 7680x4320 in 30Hz over 2x 4K monitors at WQHD with 144hz or 4k resolution which is down-calculated with Down Semlping to Full HD, this goes far beyond the 150 Watts of the manufacturer angeaben in the power consumption.

makes at normal settings 350-400 watts with overclocking 450-550 watts for the whole system

Generally you should always provide 100-150 watts more EPU power for a gaming system.

even if it works with 400-450 watts for the transistors and capacitors but that is already the highest load limit .. on my first 450 watt EPU I have gradually burst the capacitors (GTX6702GB-OC)

at 600 watts, the voltage transformers and capacitors in the power cord echoed much longer .. and latest power supplies with 600 watts or more consume now only what the system actually needs

for 2 graphics cards, it should be at least 800-1000 watts

I would install a 600-800Watt ATX 2.3 EPU rated Bronze + or even better in consumption, with Active PFC and over and under volt protection

with 2x 2 Pin6 + 2 cables for 2 graphics cards and 2 EATX 12 Volt plugs for the motherboard.

if you want to connect 2 PCI-E cards via Crossfire.

I use myself for 3-4 years a Xilence power supply 800W ATX 2.3 power supply that could also drive 2-3 graphics cards or a dual board with 2 CPU / APU, s and 2-3 graphics cards.

Hardware information see link DX12 Bench VR Ready ROG Crossblade Ranger FM2+ Board Athlon X4 860K CPU 16GB G.Skill TridentX 2400mhz and Asus ROG Strix RX580 8GB t8G Gaming DX12 Timespy Benchmark 3Dmark Demo 1000 Benchmark points less then a 2xRX580 System with the same Hardware Ram and A88X Chipset

from my point of view and without again in the next 24 months in things GPU upgrade .. sell the RX550 for 40-50 bucks if possible and place it for 110 a rx570 with 4gb a rx580 with 8GB it already from 159- $ 169 or € buy. And for everything to play in the next 2 years should be enough.

Incidentally, 2 graphics cards as 2way xfire composite do not bring the really double performance but only about 25% more with two x8 PCI-E 3.0 ports, so an RX580 on a PCI-E3.0x16 is much more effective than 2 or 3 cards in a x8x8x4 Over 2 PCI-E3.0x8 and one more PCI-E2.0x4 port .. with a maximum of 20 PCI Express lanes on the current FM2 + and AM4 boards with A88X or X350-470 chipsets .. even the new X570 board has only 28- 32 PCI-E Lanses are installed, of which 20 can be used for the GPU and the remaining for the 2-3 M.2 / NVMe SSD ports. for 40 lanes or more you would have to get an X99 board for Intel CPU, s or an AMD threadripper board to use 2 graphics cards over 2 PCI-E 3.0 x16 ports.

with 2x 2 Pin6 + 2 cables for 2 graphics cards and 2 EATX 12 Volt plugs for the motherboard.

if you want to connect 2 PCI-E cards via Crossfire.

I use myself for 3-4 years a Xilence power supply 800W ATX 2.3 power supply that could also drive 2-3 graphics cards or a dual board with 2 CPU / APU, s and 2-3 graphics cards.

Hardware information see link ROG A88X+ROG RX580 T8G

from my point of view and without again in the next 24 months in things GPU upgrade .. sell the RX550 for 40-50 bucks if possible and place it for 110 a rx570 with 4gb a rx580 with 8GB it already from 159- $ 169 or € buy. And for everything to play in the next 2 years should be enough.

Incidentally, 2 graphics cards as 2way xfire composite do not bring the really double performance but only about 25% more with two x8 PCI-E 3.0 ports, so an RX580 on a PCI-E3.0x16 is much more effective than 2 or 3 cards in a x8x8x4 Over 2 PCI-E3.0x8 and one more PCI-E2.0x4 port .. with a maximum of 20 PCI Express lanes on the current FM2 + and AM4 boards with A88X or X350-470 chipsets .. even the new X570 board has only 28- 32 PCI-E Lanses are installed, of which 20 can be used for the GPU and the remaining for the 2-3 M.2 / NVMe SSD ports. for 40 lanes or more you would have to get an X99 board for Intel CPU, s or an AMD threadripper board to use 2 graphics cards over 2 PCI-E 3.0 x16 ports.

Sorry for my bad English i am from Germany and i need to use google translate
 
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Eximo

Titan
Herald
There is a lot of superfluous information in the above post.

If we assume an RX560 with no PCIe power connector, it will be 75W max. Ryzen 2400G is relatively low power at 65W, the rest of the total system power won't add up to much more than a 200W total.

I see no reason a decent 320W power supply couldn't run this. However, not all 320W power supplies are created equal. If you can provide the information from the label, regarding the power for each rail, we can get a better picture. Particularly the 12V rail(s), if the power of that is anywhere close to 300W I wouldn't consider it dangerous to put in a larger card.

You should not pursue crossfire at all. It is not a worthwhile investment, a single faster card is always better. It is not compatible with all games, and as mentioned above, doesn't always scale even in games it does support. PCIe lanes really don't matter with cards this small, 4x PCIe 3.0 is plenty for lighter cards. Only when you get into massive GPUs does the available bandwidth become a concern.

If you were to purchase the recommended RX570, though I would urge you to go for the 8GB models, you should purchase a new PSU, but something like 520-550W from a reputable brand like Seasonic, EVGA, or Corsair.

Heavy overclocking is really the only reason to have a power supply larger since you can easily double the power requirements of CPUs and GPUs. Really it is best to go with the amount of PCIe power connectors on a given power supply as a good rule of thumb for power capacity when you are building casual systems.

That said, I do have an 850W power supply. but I have my CPU overclocked to the point of 200W+, GPU overclocked to probably pull 300W+ (hard to measure that one), and 7 fans and a water pump totaling probably another 100W or so. That puts me squarely in the 50-80% range where PSUs are most efficient.
 
Reactions: King_V
As an addendum:

https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#c=395,392&sort=price&P=4294967296,51539607552&page=1

There are RX 570 cards that are cheaper than even the cheapest RX 560/1024 (I did not add the cut-down 560/896 to the search), including one 8GB model of 570 that's still cheaper than the cheapest 560. I'd recommend the 570.

If you can get the information off your PSU's label, that would help, so we can determine if it's providing sufficient power to the 12V rail to run this AND has PCIe power connectors, which the RX 570 will require.

If not, then your existing PSU would have to be replaced. Shouldn't be a problem, assuming that it's a standard form factor and not some kind of oddball proprietary unit.

EDIT: edited link to exclude 2GB models of the 560.
 
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