Question Can someone help identify blown component on Zotac RTX 2060 ?

Kudabeybe

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I have a Zotac RTX 2060 that seems to have a blown component on it. I am not sure what this component is; a capacitor, resistor... maybe a diode?!

Here is a picture of the area and some measurements I took from adjacent components.
Edit: The reason for the two measurements is that I get different readings when I flip the SMD meter ends.

I have some experience de-soldering and soldering components on boards but have not attempted something this tiny. Also I have a damaged GTX 1070 which I am hoping might have some components that I can use for this.
Here is an image of the damage on the GTX 1070 (which I think is too much to fix myself).

Anyway, I was hoping if someone reading this might be able to shed some light on how to proceed with this. Maybe help me identify the component. Or maybe tell me what I am doing wrong. Hehehe.

With regards to the computer that was running the RTX 2060, it seems to be working just fine. Running it currently using the igpu.

Also in case anyone is curious, the GTX 1070 did not blow up in this system, it was in a older computer and the system continued to function after the incident. (I just sold it off with the original gpu I got for it; a GTX 770)
 
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That's a capacitor, but it will be hard determining what exactly to buy. It's an MLCC cap, but there's no writing on it... without a datasheet I can't recommend you anything. Might be a 100 nF one, but I can't be sure. Soldering will be a huge pain too.

Also, measuring the capacitance of a similar MLCC cap (the one on the top right of the 4.7 ohm resistor looks pretty similar) will require you to desolder it from the PCB... that way you'll get accurate measurements.

If you're not experienced doing soldering work on SMDs I'll recommend against it.
 

Kudabeybe

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Hi ChumP... so if you are sure it is a capacitor (MLCC cap) I can then try to do what you just said; test the similar looking cap to check it's values.

Alternatively, before I attempt that, I was thinking maybe I can pull off a similar looking cap from the 1070 I have, maybe they might work... though I am not sure how the values differ based on how they look.

And regarding the option of not doing this... well... I do not know anyone in my country who does this stuff. (Or at least I do not know anyone I trust to do this type of job).
So I got no option but to try this myself.
 

Kudabeybe

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May 12, 2016
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Update:
So I just removed the cap and the top pad seems to be torn off with a little bit left. Do you think it can still work?

Here is an image of the area.
I am almost 95% sure that I did everything right in the removal process; heat it up to the point where the cap starts to slide off + plenty of flux.
 

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