[SOLVED] Can someone point me to safe OC settings for my i7-12700k so I don't fry it ?

Gregkar

Distinguished
Dec 18, 2013
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Hi, i finished me pc upgrade and now i am looking for an OC guide. I found one 5min video on Youtube but he is using 1.425v and a lot of users in the comments are saying this is an extremely high number and there is a risk that the cpu can be damaged.

Specs:
i7-12700k
MSI Z-690A Pro DDR4
4x8GB DDR4 3200Mhz
Corsair RMX 850w
Gigabyte RTX 3070 Eagle OC
MSI C240 Liquid Cooler
 

keith12

Illustrious
Hey there,

So, when it comes to OC'ing, settings that work for one PC (CPU) may not work for another. You will have to do some work yourself. You can follow a good starters guide like this to set you on your way: https://forums.tomshardware.com/faq/cpu-overclocking-guide-and-tutorial-for-beginners.3347428/ - This is a great guide by one of the former Mods here.

However, with all of that said, why do you feel the need to OC your CPU? It's already a stellar gaming CPU, and with the boost algorithms that Intel use, ensure you are getting pretty much max performance on 2-4 cores at gaming load. TBH I wouldn't bother OC your CPU as it will yield just a few percent increase in performance at most, and at the cost of higher voltage (heat). Sure, if you want to hit some synthetic benchmark scores, then work away. But for the most part you don't need to OC it at all.
 
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Reactions: Gregkar

keith12

Illustrious
Hey there,

So, when it comes to OC'ing, settings that work for one PC (CPU) may not work for another. You will have to do some work yourself. You can follow a good starters guide like this to set you on your way: https://forums.tomshardware.com/faq/cpu-overclocking-guide-and-tutorial-for-beginners.3347428/ - This is a great guide by one of the former Mods here.

However, with all of that said, why do you feel the need to OC your CPU? It's already a stellar gaming CPU, and with the boost algorithms that Intel use, ensure you are getting pretty much max performance on 2-4 cores at gaming load. TBH I wouldn't bother OC your CPU as it will yield just a few percent increase in performance at most, and at the cost of higher voltage (heat). Sure, if you want to hit some synthetic benchmark scores, then work away. But for the most part you don't need to OC it at all.
 
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Reactions: Gregkar

keith12

Illustrious
Well, OC'ing can be a lot of fun, specially for me as I've always loved pushing my hardware. But, as much as it's fun, and there can be some good results, it doesn't really bring anything to my gaming sessions. I don't notice the extra 5fps that a CPU Overclock might yield. So it's not worth it.

I've a Ryzen 5600x which uses similar algorithims as Intel, and the CPU boosts automatically to 4.85ghz. I just leave my CPU running with PBO, and off it goes and does it's thing.

It's the same for your chip!

Anyway, enjoy your nice new system, and happy gaming. If we can help with anything else just let us know.
 
Reactions: Gregkar

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
If you want to OC, that works both ways. Right now you are at default settings, which also means default voltages, current and LLC use etc. Leaving your clock speeds and speedstep alone, you could try undervolting the cpu, which if done right will net lower temps for the same, if not better performance.

OC doesn't necessarily mean higher clocks than stock, its better described as a cpu using higher frequency per clock according to stock voltage. Meaning stock speeds at a lower than stock voltage is an overclock, the cpu is running faster than intended for the given voltage.

As long as the pc is stable, and operating within Intel spec'd parameters, that's all safe really means.
 

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