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[SOLVED] Can You Check My Build and Give Personal Feedback? Please and Thank you

Jul 3, 2020
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So first off I'm trying to stick to a build around $1,500 for all the new parts that I don't currently own.

I currently own a gaming laptop (Asus g752VL) which I plan on selling and I own an external 500 GB Samsung SSD, mouse, mouse pad, keyboard, and 144hz Asus monitor. Now I also own a eGPU (Razer Core X) with a RTX 2060 super inside. Basically I want to upgrade to something better that will last me a couple years.

This is the current build I have on PC part picker: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/ymqQHB .

1 x Intel Core i9-9900K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor
1 x be quiet! Dark Rock Pro 4 50.5 CFM CPU Cooler
1 x Gigabyte Z390 DESIGNARE ATX LGA1151 Motherboard
1 x G.Skill Trident Z Neo 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory
1 x Samsung 970 Evo 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive
1 x NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case
1 x Windows Home

My first question would be do I really need to get a separate PSU? The PSU inside of the eGPU is 650 watts and model name is PS - 8651 - 2. I'm open to getting a new one if I physically have to but I'd like to save money to put towards other things.

I'm extremely open to changing the case, motherboard, and cpu cooler.

I'm acceptable to CPU and memory changes. When it comes to CPU though I want something that I will be able to do stuff such as stream, code, and video edit. Memory I would also like 32 GBs and fast obviously.

I plan on getting another external monitor with a better refresh rate but that'll probably be a birthday present from my girlfriend soon so no need for any monitor upgrades.

Any suggestions you have will be greatly appreciated! Basically I just want best bang for my buck that I know will work when I put everything together.
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
And if we're being honest, going from what you had to what you'll have, this probably makes MUCH more sense than what either of us posted above.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($273.47 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Thermalright Le Grand Macho RT 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler ($79.98 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock B550 Steel Legend ATX AM4 Motherboard ($203.94 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Trident Z Neo 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory ($179.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial MX500 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($114.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair TXM Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($130.49 @ Amazon)
Total: $982.86
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-07-03 03:37 EDT-0400
 
Reactions: masonsatt

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Your PSU inside the eGPU isn't going to run the desktop system, isn't even compatible with it in any way. So yes, you really need to get a separate PSU.

Futhermore, you'd be MUCH better off to take the RTX 2060 OUT of that enclosure and install it in your motherboard. Do NOT use it externally. You are shortening it's life expectancy, it's performance and probably also there's a good chance that it simply won't work the way you want it to if you try to use it externally. It will simply eliminate a lot of unnecessary problems if you remove it and install it in the motherboard and case.

Are there specific reasons why you've chosen the very expensive Designare motherboard, the H510 case, the Dark rock Pro 4 cooler and the 3600mhz memory that probably isn't going to net you any better performance in real world usage than a set of good CL14 3200mhz sticks that probably cost a bit less would give you?
 
Jul 3, 2020
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Your PSU inside the eGPU isn't going to run the desktop system, isn't even compatible with it in any way. So yes, you really need to get a separate PSU.

Futhermore, you'd be MUCH better off to take the RTX 2060 OUT of that enclosure and install it in your motherboard. Do NOT use it externally. You are shortening it's life expectancy, it's performance and probably also there's a good chance that it simply won't work the way you want it to if you try to use it externally. It will simply eliminate a lot of unnecessary problems if you remove it and install it in the motherboard and case.

Are there specific reasons why you've chosen the very expensive Designare motherboard, the H510 case, the Dark rock Pro 4 cooler and the 3600mhz memory that probably isn't going to net you any better performance in real world usage than a set of good CL14 3200mhz sticks that probably cost a bit less would give you?
I figured as much about getting a PSU. Any suggestion for a PSU with my setup? I also knew about using the RTX on the motherboard itself I probably should've been more specific.

No specific reason I picked any of those things, just basically researched what was the best and went off that. I'm okay with changing memory I just didn't know if the 3600 would have a huge difference compared to the 3200.

Thanks for all the help it truly means a lot, I like having an extra opinion!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Actually, here is the problem right now. Is there a NEED to build this NOW, or are you just in the planning stage? The reason I ask is because, and it SHOULD be fairly obvious but perhaps not for everybody, that the prices of hardware are extremely high right now, and availability is incredibly slim, because of course China basically shut down for like three months and pretty much about 80% of PC hardware including motherboards, CPU coolers, fans, power supplies, graphics cards and cases come out of China. So there was no or little manufacturing going on and zero product being shipped out for the most part, during that time.

Seems they are somewhat getting back on track now, but it's going to take some time for the supply to catch back up with the demand, especially since now there is a new motherboard family out for the Ryzen products, which, I'm also curious why you decided to not only go with Intel, but with a last gen Intel CPU rather than a 10th gen model?

To be clear, unless you are FULLY resolved to only entertain the idea of Intel parts, the AMD Ryzen CPU choices are just so much better in most cases. There might be SOME small amount of performance advantage for gaming with Intel, but not much, and you can generally get the same performance or close enough that it doesn't matter because you'll already be beyond the point where any gains can translate to anything substantial for you (As in, if you have a 60hz display, getting 95FPS probably isn't much of a benefit. If you have a 144hz display, getting 200FPS doesn't help really either.).

But that's totally up to you. Obviously, it's your money, your system, your choice.

You do realize that your current build, if it was including the M.2 drive and the CPU cooler, would not be within your 1500 dollar budget since that cooler runs about 100 bucks and that drive runs about 190-210.00 normally. Neither of them is, however, in stock anyhow anywhere, so really not an option.

Going with the same theme, staying with Intel, going with a better M.2 drive, CPU and cooler, and IMO, a better choice of motherboard as well for a lot less money, you're looking at something like this which honestly is a much better configuration than what we were looking at originally. I'm not sure I like your choice of case, in fact, being honest, I don't, for this caliber of build, but I'll leave that up to you. You probably are going to want to also budget for a couple of extra case fans, no matter what case you go with, because they rarely come with more than one or two fans and those are almost never terribly high quality.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i7-10700K 3.8 GHz 8-Core Processor ($444.20 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D15 CHROMAX.BLACK 82.52 CFM CPU Cooler
Motherboard: Gigabyte Z490 AORUS ULTRA ATX LGA1200 Motherboard ($279.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Trident Z Neo 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL18 Memory ($159.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate FireCuda 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($188.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair TXM Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($130.49 @ Amazon)
Total: $1203.66
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-07-03 03:06 EDT-0400
 
Reactions: Quanticriver

DSzymborski

Champion
Moderator
I share DB's concerns. There are some definite balance problems with the build and some curious component choice.

Why did you choose the i9-9900K? An 8 core/16 thread Coffee Lake Refresh is a particularly poor value proposition when the 8 core/16 thread Comet Lake i7-10700K is nearly $100 cheaper and on the more modern platform.

What features caused you to choose the Designare over similarly high-quality, but less expensive motherboards? Or conversely, what features are you looking for in a motherboard? Don't get me wrong, it's an excellent motherboard, but it's excellent because of specific features that people are looking for. I don't want you to have to spend money on something that you'll get little or no real-world benefit out of.

The case is also a curious choice. With this level of equipment, it makes sense to focus on something of at least moderately higher quality.

Assuming you keep the 2600 Super and from the usage you've described, I'd recommend something more along these lines.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i7-10700K 3.8 GHz 8-Core Processor ($409.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: be quiet! Dark Rock Pro 4 50.5 CFM CPU Cooler ($89.90 @ B&H)
Motherboard: MSI MAG Z490 TOMAHAWK ATX LGA1200 Motherboard ($179.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 CL14 Memory ($199.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 970 Evo 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($179.99 @ B&H)
Case: Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case ($99.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair RM (2019) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($119.97 @ Newegg)
Total: $1279.81
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-07-03 03:13 EDT-0400
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
And if we're being honest, going from what you had to what you'll have, this probably makes MUCH more sense than what either of us posted above.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($273.47 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Thermalright Le Grand Macho RT 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler ($79.98 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock B550 Steel Legend ATX AM4 Motherboard ($203.94 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Trident Z Neo 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory ($179.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial MX500 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($114.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair TXM Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($130.49 @ Amazon)
Total: $982.86
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-07-03 03:37 EDT-0400
 
Reactions: masonsatt
Jul 3, 2020
5
0
10
0
Actually, here is the problem right now. Is there a NEED to build this NOW, or are you just in the planning stage? The reason I ask is because, and it SHOULD be fairly obvious but perhaps not for everybody, that the prices of hardware are extremely high right now, and availability is incredibly slim, because of course China basically shut down for like three months and pretty much about 80% of PC hardware including motherboards, CPU coolers, fans, power supplies, graphics cards and cases come out of China. So there was no or little manufacturing going on and zero product being shipped out for the most part, during that time.

Seems they are somewhat getting back on track now, but it's going to take some time for the supply to catch back up with the demand, especially since now there is a new motherboard family out for the Ryzen products, which, I'm also curious why you decided to not only go with Intel, but with a last gen Intel CPU rather than a 10th gen model?

To be clear, unless you are FULLY resolved to only entertain the idea of Intel parts, the AMD Ryzen CPU choices are just so much better in most cases. There might be SOME small amount of performance advantage for gaming with Intel, but not much, and you can generally get the same performance or close enough that it doesn't matter because you'll already be beyond the point where any gains can translate to anything substantial for you (As in, if you have a 60hz display, getting 95FPS probably isn't much of a benefit. If you have a 144hz display, getting 200FPS doesn't help really either.).

But that's totally up to you. Obviously, it's your money, your system, your choice.

You do realize that your current build, if it was including the M.2 drive and the CPU cooler, would not be within your 1500 dollar budget since that cooler runs about 100 bucks and that drive runs about 190-210.00 normally. Neither of them is, however, in stock anyhow anywhere, so really not an option.

Going with the same theme, staying with Intel, going with a better M.2 drive, CPU and cooler, and IMO, a better choice of motherboard as well for a lot less money, you're looking at something like this which honestly is a much better configuration than what we were looking at originally. I'm not sure I like your choice of case, in fact, being honest, I don't, for this caliber of build, but I'll leave that up to you. You probably are going to want to also budget for a couple of extra case fans, no matter what case you go with, because they rarely come with more than one or two fans and those are almost never terribly high quality.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i7-10700K 3.8 GHz 8-Core Processor ($444.20 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D15 CHROMAX.BLACK 82.52 CFM CPU Cooler
Motherboard: Gigabyte Z490 AORUS ULTRA ATX LGA1200 Motherboard ($279.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Trident Z Neo 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL18 Memory ($159.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate FireCuda 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($188.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair TXM Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($130.49 @ Amazon)
Total: $1203.66
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-07-03 03:06 EDT-0400
I actually started off with the ryzen 9 3950x when picking parts but have changed my mind many times, and I even once had the i7-10700k as a build at one point too. The reason I had the i9-9900k over the i7-10700k was because I thought the price vs performance difference wasn't extremely different. Would you happen to know a build with a motherboard for the ryzen 3950x? I'd be willing to spend a little bit more for it if you believe that the CPU would be better than the i7-10700k.

There is no exact time constraint, and I knew prices on parts were inflated currently. I'm not exactly worried about going over budget price I just particularly don't want to be spending money on parts if their performance won't be worth the price.

Again thanks for all your input!

EDIT: The ryzen 9 3950x might be dumb and I just saw your new post, I just had it because it was on the high end cpu benchmark. Im also okay with any case I just picked a random one. I just want a case I know all the parts will fit into so anything you throw in that you know would fit would be amazing for the 3700x or 3950x
 
Last edited:
Jul 3, 2020
5
0
10
0
I share DB's concerns. There are some definite balance problems with the build and some curious component choice.

Why did you choose the i9-9900K? An 8 core/16 thread Coffee Lake Refresh is a particularly poor value proposition when the 8 core/16 thread Comet Lake i7-10700K is nearly $100 cheaper and on the more modern platform.

What features caused you to choose the Designare over similarly high-quality, but less expensive motherboards? Or conversely, what features are you looking for in a motherboard? Don't get me wrong, it's an excellent motherboard, but it's excellent because of specific features that people are looking for. I don't want you to have to spend money on something that you'll get little or no real-world benefit out of.

The case is also a curious choice. With this level of equipment, it makes sense to focus on something of at least moderately higher quality.

Assuming you keep the 2600 Super and from the usage you've described, I'd recommend something more along these lines.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i7-10700K 3.8 GHz 8-Core Processor ($409.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: be quiet! Dark Rock Pro 4 50.5 CFM CPU Cooler ($89.90 @ B&H)
Motherboard: MSI MAG Z490 TOMAHAWK ATX LGA1200 Motherboard ($179.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 CL14 Memory ($199.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 970 Evo 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($179.99 @ B&H)
Case: Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case ($99.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair RM (2019) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($119.97 @ Newegg)
Total: $1279.81
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-07-03 03:13 EDT-0400
Honestly have no clue what makes one motherboard better than another. I particularly just wanted a good motherboard and a thunderbolt 3 port for my external ssd. Kinda a noob when comes to matching things up
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
If you decide to go with a higher end CPU like the 3900x or 3950x, then you will probably want to go with a higher end motherboard. More expensive, but likely NECESSARY in terms of thermal performance.

As you can see at the following link, the Steel legend has significantly higher thermals than many other boards, however, many other boards are significantly more expensive as well. The chances are very good that the cost of ALL this hardware is going to drop significantly over the coming weeks, so if you don't have to pull the trigger right now, then waiting might make a lot of sense.
 
Reactions: masonsatt
Jul 3, 2020
5
0
10
0
If you decide to go with a higher end CPU like the 3900x or 3950x, then you will probably want to go with a higher end motherboard. More expensive, but likely NECESSARY in terms of thermal performance.

As you can see at the following link, the Steel legend has significantly higher thermals than many other boards, however, many other boards are significantly more expensive as well. The chances are very good that the cost of ALL this hardware is going to drop significantly over the coming weeks, so if you don't have to pull the trigger right now, then waiting might make a lot of sense.
Well thank you for teaching me somethings today! I will try to educate myself a little bit more on motherboards while I wait for the market to stabilize.
 

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