Question Can you recomend the latest Intel CPU based full sized ATX motherboards to me?

mraroid

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Hi folks...

I am getting ready to build a new desktop for myself. I have a full sized ATX case and wish to buy a full sized ATX motherboard.
I would like to buy the most current , or one step down from the most current chip set and socket that supports an Intel CPU.

Can someone point me in the right direction?

Many thanks,

mraroid
 

mraroid

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Thank you Captain for the very good help! I will start looking.
I suspect that I can buy a motherboard now that will support PCIe-5? Is that out yet?

I appreciate all the great help!

mraroid
 

geofelt

Titan
What is your budget, and what is the purpose of this pc?

How many expansion slots do you plan on using?
For most of us, that is exactly one for a discrete graphics card.

On a full ATX board you get 7 slots, and a MATX board gives you 4.
MATX fits perfectly well in a ATX case.

If you have a budget, as I think you do, look for a MATX B660 DDR4 based motherboard.
They are about $120-$140.

B660 lets you run a 12th gen intel processor.
They are some 19% faster per clock than 11th gen.
Intel I3-12100 for starters is $130.
https://www.newegg.com/intel-core-i3-12100-core-i3-12th-gen/p/N82E16819118370?quicklink=true
 

BFG-9000

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One slot? Here's how a mini-ITX board looks installed in a full-sized Corsair Obsidian Series 900D case.

There are actually three even smaller board sizes that can fit into an ATX case: nano-ITX, pico-ITX and mobile-ITX. But none of those can fit a full-sized DIMM, only so-DIMMs.
 

mraroid

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Thanks everyone for your help. Here is my application:

I want to buy a modern, fast, full sized ATX Intel motherboard which supports PCIe-5. To keep costs down, I will populate it with a low cost CPU that windows 11 will support. I have a new fast Nvidia PCIe-4 video card (GeForce RTX 3050) that will work for now. If the memory slots on the motherboard can take four 32 GB memory sticks, I will just buy one one 32 GB stick. I would prefer DDR 5, but I see that DDR 4 is more common (?). I would like at a minimum of two PCIe-5 slots.

This will get me up and running. After a few years, CPU prices will drop and I can upgrade my CPU. After a while, PCIe-5 video cards will drop in price and I can upgrade.

Many years ago I found a web site that listed many motherboards, cases, power supplies, CPUs etc. You could use this site to build up a desktop. I have lost that link.

If someone could post it, I can do almost all of my digging around at a site like that.

Can anyone post a link to a web site like that?

Thanks again for all the help and suggestions. I have not built a desktop computer in six years. So much has changed! I am getting old I guess...

mraroid
 

geofelt

Titan
Time, I think to revise your thinking.

If cost is an issue, plan on using DDR4.
Performance is no different and DDR4 ram and motherboards are definitely cheaper.

Using pcie 2/3/4/5 makes little difference functionally is not an issue.
Cards and slots are forward and backwards compatible.
Negligible difference in performance unless you are talking about 3090 class cards. And then the difference in gpu performance is in the low single digits.

Buy all the ram you anticipate up front.
If you add ram later, there is a definite possibility that it will not work.
Worse, it may work improperly with strange symptoms.
Current gaming motherboards may have 2 or 4 ram slots, but they will only be capable of running dual channel operation.

Buy the cpu you need up front.
At least to handle your needs for two years.

As a practical matter, cpu upgrades are almost always accompanied by a motherboard change.

This forum is a good place for advice and opinions.
I like to do research on newegg.
Good product descriptions and a reasonable way to estimate prices.
 
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mraroid

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Geofelt...

Thank you so much for your detailed information and suggestions. I suspect you can tell it has been quite some time since I built a desktop. So I do appreciate the time you have spent in your above post...

1) DDR4 - Check. Sounds good. Will do

2) I have been running on 16 GBs of RAM. I am not sure if I have ever run out of RAM. I thought I would try for 32 GBs. I run a old version of Photoshop. I do go to a on line sort of game called Second Life (which is free). We are not talking high end video games with high resolution avatars, or 60 fps, etc. In SL they restrict your bandwidth anyway (3,000Kbps). In my old computer I am running an older i7, 16 GBs of RAM and a Nvidia 1080 video card in a PCIe-3 slot. To future proof myself, I would like to buy a motherboard that supports PCIe-5. I have new video card to install. It is a modest PCIe-4 card. It is a Nvidia GeForce RTX 3050 with 8 GBs of DDR6. I think it will work fine for now. In the future, I can upgrade to a PCIe-5 video card.

3) I am looking at (but have not made up my mind yet) at an 12th generation intel core i7-12700kf. I have no need for a graphic chip on my motherboard as I always use a video card.

I do have a question about this CPU. It takes a FCLGA1700 slot. I noticed that the 12th generation i9 processors also take this slot. I suspect that I need to look at what ever motherboard I buy, but could it be possible to buy a motherboard that supports PCIe-5 and will also let me upgrade to a i9 processor in the future? I am talking a few years from now when the prices come down? I have done that in the past and it has worked for me.

Any thought on that?

Again, thank you for all the great suggestions. I have so much to think about and decide. It is great having folks on this forum to chat with about this.

best,

mraroid
 

geofelt

Titan
2) Plan on a 2 x 16gb ddr4 kit. Photoshop can use ram as workspace and my reading says more ram is better for photoshop.



3) Unless your budget is very limited, where the extra $25 or so makes a difference, I would buy the CPU with integrated grapnics. It is easiest to test with the gpu on the motherboard, and on occasion you will have graphics issues that can be diagnosed easier if you have an alternative graphics adapter.
Also, integrated graphics has Quick sync which may be of use to you.
https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/architecture-and-technology/quick-sync-video/quick-sync-video-general.html
I am no expert on this so you need to do some research.

Most lga 1700 motherboards will support pcie 5.0 X16.
If you go to newegg and filter on lga1700 and pcie 5,0 you will get a list of such cards.

On any selected motherboard, go to the motherboard maker's web site and access their support tab.
It will list all of the supported processors.

In general, any lga1700 motherboard will allow a I9 to be connected.
But, the issue will become how well.
A I9 can draw a lot of power when running to it's potential.
Look at the image for the motherboard.
Look for a motherboard with a robust set of cooling for the vrm's.
You might also look at the 4/8 pin EPS power connectors.
Good overclocking boards that can handle higher current will have two 8 pin connectors.

Here is an example of a basic B660 motherboard:
https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16813162042?quicklink=true

A more advanced Z690 version with two 8 pin connectors:
https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16813162042?quicklink=true

On selecting a processor, get acquainted with the passmark ratings.
For example, a I7-12700K has 20 processing threads. 16 of which are high performance and 4 are lower performing. The total passmark rating is when all 20 are fully utilized
The total rating is 34164. For games and overall quickness, there is a single thread rating which is 4049:
https://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=Intel+Core+i7-12700K&id=4609

A more modest I5-12400 processor would have 12 threads and a rating of 19538/3531:
https://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=Intel+Core+i5-12400&id=4677

What is your current processor?
search google for "xx-xxxx passmark" and your first hit should be the link you want.
 
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mraroid

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Geofelt and all....

My current desktop is maybe 6 or 7 years old. It will not update to 11. I know hacks are around, but I am not at all into that. I want to build a new desktop, in a full sized ATX case.

My current desktop is in a smaller tower. It has a Gigabit motherboard but I can not recall the model number. (I am on my laptop and away from home at the moment). In it, am running an i7-5820K 3.3 Ghz CPU, and 16GBs of RAM. The motherboard has a PCIe-3 bus and I have a Nvidia GeForce 1080 card in it (which is a PCIe-3 card I believe). I can not remember the brand name of my power supply, but it is 800 Watts.

The version of Photoshop I am running is from CS3. I think it might be Photoshop 10. Very old. I am not even sure I can move it to my new computer.

Yes, now that you have pointed it out, I am sure you are right - paying a few dollars more for GPU on the motherboard would be useful in testing.

I do not know what vrm's are. Can you tell me please?

Back in the old days, when it was just the internet, and before the web, I ran a FIDO dial up BBS. I ported internet news groups to my dial up BBS, and gave anyone free access. I had a 300/1200 dial up modem connected to my IBM PC XT. When the HD lamp came on in the modem, it stood for High Speed! 1200 bps! But as soon as the World Wide Web came about, I and my friends installed FreeBSD and learned how to run web servers. Back then I was really into buying high end power supplies. And I am still that way today. I appreciate a well made power supply. I will probably go with 800 or 850 watts, but I do not think I would use that much.

About 6/7 years ago, I knew enough to build my current desktop computer. But the technology has gotten away from me.

I really appreciate all the detail in the above posts. I will start reading and then come back.

Thanks again everyone for helping me!

all the best,

mraroid
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
There are plenty of boards to pick from, it all comes down to the features you want.

Do you need WiFi, do you want 10Gbps Ethernet, 2.5Gbps Ethernet, Thunderbolt, high end audio, More than 3 or so M.2 drives, and the list goes on.

If you just need a basic motherboard to support a high end CPU, what was posted in your other thread is more than enough. You can also go much, much cheaper with a B660 board.

Most people these days just need 1 or 2 M.2 slots and a GPU slot, and maybe WiFi.



Voltage Regulation Modules. The larger Intel CPUs can draw 250W+. Cheaper boards have limited power delivery and will throttle under a heavy CPU load. Z690 boards generally have larger VRMs with full coverage heatsinks, this lets them push power to the CPU without overheating.
 

Lafong

Respectable
could it be possible to buy a motherboard that supports PCIe-5 and will also let me upgrade to a i9 processor in the future? I am talking a few years from now when the prices come down?
How far in the future?

It's unlikely the current 1700 socket will accept mid and upper level CPUs in 3 years....maybe not even in 2 years.

Generally....I'd try to buy a CPU/motherboard combination today at the top of your budget. As much as you can afford today.

When that combo becomes "too slow" or lacks features you must have or outright fails, then consider replacing BOTH at the same time....unless of course budget is of little or no concern to you.

That web site you referred to that you used at one time to piece together a build may have been:

pcpartpicker.com
 

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