[SOLVED] Can you recommend a good replacement PSU for my old system?

tr0lolol

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My [current] build:

Motherboard: ASUS P8Z77-I Deluxe (Mini ITX)
CPU: Intel i7 3770K @ stock
GPU: ASUS Radeon RX 570 Strix @ stock
Crucial M500 SSD 120 GB
HDD: Seagate HDD 1 TB + 3TB
PSU: Corsair TX650M Semi-modular 80 Bronze
RAM: G.Skill Ripjaws X DDR3 2 x 8GB


So a little backstory:
So I built this PC back in 2012. I actually started with a ASUS GTX 760 DirectCU II Mini Graphics Card when I first built it. Back in 2015, while gaming (It was Starcraft II), the PC unexpectedly shutdown, and upon restarting the GPU ignited (yes there were burn marks near the power ports). I suspected it was just a power surge that caused the GPU to fail. I did not put a new graphics card on this unit until recently, about a week ago. I bought a ASUS Radeon RX 570 Expedition (different form the Strix above). I tested it out for a few days, and while gaming (this time, playing Crysis) the PC suddenly turned off (this case was not as grave as the previous one). My temps were far from thermal shutdown (70 celsius), the BIOS was updated, and resetting the CMOS battery did not do anything. The PC just won't boot unless I remove the GPU. I reported it to the retailer, and asked for a return. They confirmed that the GPU is dead and offered that I just buy the same card but different make, the RX 570 Strix and just pay a bit extra, so I did (I brought the unit to their shop to test if it boots). Now I'm scared to turn this on again in fear that this card might fail again. Initially I thought that the GPU itself was defective, but I suspect the PSU might be the culprit here.
  1. Am I wrong in this situation? Is there a way to test this?
  2. I was thinking to replace my >6 year old PSU (I've read here that old components tend to struggle with more modern components) with something that's more appropriate for the new card. If I do get a new PSU, can you suggest good budget models? Back when first bought this I thought the 650W was kinda overkill.
  3. Is there anything else that I can do to prevent this? I was thinking of adding surge protector/voltage regulators.
Sorry for the wall of text. Thanks in advance for your advice!!
 

PC Tailor

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There is no easy way to say it, but it could well be whatever has damaged the GPU has also damaged the MB.
have you tried both RAM modules individually too?

I would say follow this guide thoroughly (check everything that is even slightly applicable):
https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/perform-these-steps-before-posting-about-post-boot-no-video-problems.1285536/

If that does not yield any results at all, you can probably quite safely say:
  • It can't be GPU as it is no better even when removed
  • It can't be RAM (if you have tried both individually in different slots)
  • It (practically) can't be PSU as you've just bought a new great quality one and had the same issue with a previous PSU
  • It can't be storage or peripherals as you should have removed all of them during the breadboarding
  • It can't be front panel if you tried shorting the MB directly.
You're basically left with CPU and MB. CPU failure is rare, but happens, especially if there is other component damage, but I'd say it's much more likely to be MB.
 

PC Tailor

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Herald
Well if they confirmed the GPU was simply dead, it could be the GPU, ultimately the TXM line are better quality PSUs. I would have said return it under warranty, but it would seem only the Gold Rated TXMs have a warranty bigger than 5 years.

You could always use a multimeter to test the rails on the PSU, however just remember this only tests those rails at idle, with no load, and often it is when they are under load that the issue arises.

Regardless, I tend to follow the habit of replacing the PSU when it is out of warranty just as a good practice to ensure I'm always in a guaranteed period. A surge protector is always useful if you live in a location where this is a problem. If you still wanted to consider getting a new PSU, you could consider the following (a good 550W should do the job, but you can always go the 650W version if you want more headroom for upgrades later - obviously I'm only willing to suggest good quality units):

Power Supply: SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($66.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $66.98
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-07-07 11:06 EDT-0400


Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.89 @ OutletPC)
Total: $79.89
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-07-07 11:07 EDT-0400


Power Supply: Corsair - RMx (2018) 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $79.99
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-07-07 11:09 EDT-0400


Personally - I stand by that SeaSonic are still the brand to beat - 10 to 12 year warranty!
I have not bothered with Corsair AXi or SF for example as the above are just as good but cost much less.
Lowest tier PSU I'd be willing to recommend is a Corsair CX. But the above are much better,
 
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jonnyguru

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Back in 2015, while gaming (It was Starcraft II), the PC unexpectedly shutdown, and upon restarting the GPU ignited (yes there were burn marks near the power ports). I suspected it was just a power surge that caused the GPU to fail.
A power surge of what?

I did not put a new graphics card on this unit until recently, about a week ago.
You just used the CPU's integrated graphics?

I bought a ASUS Radeon RX 570 Expedition (different form the Strix above). I tested it out for a few days, and while gaming (this time, playing Crysis) the PC suddenly turned off (this case was not as grave as the previous one).

My temps were far from thermal shutdown (70 celsius), the BIOS was updated, and resetting the CMOS battery did not do anything. The PC just won't boot unless I remove the GPU. I reported it to the retailer, and asked for a return. They confirmed that the GPU is dead and offered that I just buy the same card but different make, the RX 570 Strix and just pay a bit extra, so I did (I brought the unit to their shop to test if it boots).
Yet the PC continues to function fine with integrated graphics?

The 70°C was CPU or GPU temperature?

What case are you using? What are your internal temperatures?

IS the fan working on the PSU?
 

tr0lolol

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Well if they confirmed the GPU was simply dead, it could be the GPU, ultimately the TXM line are better quality PSUs. I would have said return it under warranty, but it would seem only the Gold Rated TXMs have a warranty bigger than 5 years.

You could always use a multimeter to test the rails on the PSU, however just remember this only tests those rails at idle, with no load, and often it is when they are under load that the issue arises.

Regardless, I tend to follow the habit of replacing the PSU when it is out of warranty just as a good practice to ensure I'm always in a guaranteed period. A surge protector is always useful if you live in a location where this is a problem. If you still wanted to consider getting a new PSU, you could consider the following (a good 550W should do the job, but you can always go the 650W version if you want more headroom for upgrades later - obviously I'm only willing to suggest good quality units):

Power Supply: SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($66.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $66.98
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-07-07 11:06 EDT-0400


Personally - I stand by that SeaSonic are still the brand to beat - 10 to 12 year warranty!
I have not bothered with Corsair AXi or SF for example as the above are just as good but cost much less.
Lowest tier PSU I'd be willing to recommend is a Corsair CX. But the above are much better,
I agree. I have looked into the Seasonic one, and they have stock here (it's priced $87 here though). If I'm stressing out whether my PSU is good enough or not might as well get an updated one for my peace of mind lol
 

tr0lolol

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A power surge of what?
I live in South East Asia, and I thought a sudden voltage spike may have affted my PC negatively. But that was pure specualtion and I had no way to prove that.

You just used the CPU's integrated graphics?
Yet the PC continues to function fine with integrated graphics?
Yes the PC just used the CPU's integrated graphics for a while. I was away for a few years and the ones who were left to use it had work that did not require a GPU. It ran with integrated graphics until now.


The 70°C was CPU or GPU temperature?
GPU temperature. CPU was in the high 60s.

What case are you using? What are your internal temperatures?
Bitfenix Prodigy (the one for MITX). Sadly I did not monitor the internal temperatures.

IS the fan working on the PSU?
Yes, the fan is working on the PSU. When the PC boots, it turns on, then stops but it is still feeding voltage. Guessing it's just a feature?
 
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tr0lolol

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The TX-M are a good line of PSUs.

What about the answers to @jonnyguru questions above?
Hi, I bought the PSU you suggested, the SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular. And it looks great. I tested it usign the tool that came in witht he PSU and it worked fine. I plugged it into my machien and it does not turn on. Tried removing everything from the Motherbaor except the CPU and RAM. THe green LED is light but does not turn on when using the switch. I did not turn on the PC after the guys in the shop tested out the system with the new GPU. What could be the problem here?
 

PC Tailor

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Hi, I bought the PSU you suggested, the SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular. And it looks great. I tested it usign the tool that came in witht he PSU and it worked fine. I plugged it into my machien and it does not turn on. Tried removing everything from the Motherbaor except the CPU and RAM. THe green LED is light but does not turn on when using the switch. I did not turn on the PC after the guys in the shop tested out the system with the new GPU. What could be the problem here?
Hmm, so you've breadboarded the system with just the MB, PSU, CPU, 1 stick of RAM and CPU cooler?
I find it incredibly unlikely that a Seasonic PSU is DOA.
Does literally nothing occur when you press the switch? Have you tried removing the front panel entirely and shorting the motherboard?

Also, even if it isn't the PSU in the end, you've secured yourself for 10 years with that PSU, excellent quality one, so no loss.
 

tr0lolol

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Hmm, so you've breadboarded the system with just the MB, PSU, CPU, 1 stick of RAM and CPU cooler?
I find it incredibly unlikely that a Seasonic PSU is DOA.
Does literally nothing occur when you press the switch? Have you tried removing the front panel entirely and shorting the motherboard?
So here's a photo of the setup:

There's the motherbaord LED, I shorted the pins that correspond to the powerswitches near the LED. Sadly, no response still. Also tried reseating the RAM



Also, even if it isn't the PSU in the end, you've secured yourself for 10 years with that PSU, excellent quality one, so no loss.
Yeah I'm really happy with the PSU. Thanks for the suggestion!
 

PC Tailor

Distinguished
Herald
There is no easy way to say it, but it could well be whatever has damaged the GPU has also damaged the MB.
have you tried both RAM modules individually too?

I would say follow this guide thoroughly (check everything that is even slightly applicable):
https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/perform-these-steps-before-posting-about-post-boot-no-video-problems.1285536/

If that does not yield any results at all, you can probably quite safely say:
  • It can't be GPU as it is no better even when removed
  • It can't be RAM (if you have tried both individually in different slots)
  • It (practically) can't be PSU as you've just bought a new great quality one and had the same issue with a previous PSU
  • It can't be storage or peripherals as you should have removed all of them during the breadboarding
  • It can't be front panel if you tried shorting the MB directly.
You're basically left with CPU and MB. CPU failure is rare, but happens, especially if there is other component damage, but I'd say it's much more likely to be MB.
 

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