Question Cannot install Windows 10 on Asus laptop ?

true blue 2

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Mar 1, 2015
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Hi folks,

I’ve got an issue that I can’t seem to solve. I’m attempting to install a fresh copy of Windows 10 on an ASUS Vivobook Flip 14 – model TP410UA. I've used 6 different drives (2 SSD’s, 2 Hybrid HDD’s, and 2 standard HDD's), all of which are new and/or known good. Every attempt I’ve made with every drive has resulted in the following error:

“We couldn’t install Windows in the location you chose. Please check your media drive. Here’s more info about what happened: 0x80300024.”

If I listed everything I’ve tried, it would probably make for a long read for you. So, I'll just suffice to say I’ve exhausted all my expertise, and every suggestion I could find on Google, to no avail.

Here’s some things I’ve tried:
  • As mentioned, 6 known good drives
  • Updated BIOS to version 309
  • Full BIOS reset
  • Load Optimized Defaults
  • Fast Boot enabled/disabled
  • CSM enabled/disabled
  • Secure Boot enabled/disabled
  • Tried 1909, 2004, and 20H2 versions of Windows 10, both Home and Professional
  • Created new install media using both USB flash drives and DVD
  • Tried all USB ports for connecting install media
  • Tried all drives in uninitialized, initialized, unformatted, and formatted states
Plus a few other things that didn't work or may be too lengthy and/or insignificant to mention.

I suspect the motherboard may be the culprit, but it appears to be functional in every other respect. I would definitely appreciate any suggestions you could send my way.

Thanks!
 
Last edited:

hang-the-9

Titan
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Mar 25, 2010
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Hi folks,

I’ve got an issue that I can’t seem to solve. I’m attempting to install a fresh copy of Windows 10 on an ASUS Vivobook Flip 14 – model TP410UA. I've used 6 different drives (2 SSD’s, 2 Hybrid HDD’s, and 2 standard HDD's), all of which are new and/or known good. Every attempt I’ve made with every drive has resulted in the following error:

“We couldn’t install Windows in the location you chose. Please check your media drive. Here’s more info about what happened: 0x80300024.”

If I listed everything I’ve tried, it would probably make for a long read for you. So, I'll just suffice to say I’ve exhausted all my expertise, and every suggestion I could find on Google, to no avail.

Here’s some things I’ve tried:
  • As mentioned, 6 known good drives
  • Updated BIOS to version 309
  • Full BIOS reset
  • Load Optimized Defaults
  • Fast Boot enabled/disabled
  • CSM enabled/disabled
  • Secure Boot enabled/disabled
  • Tried 1909, 2004, and 20H2 versions of Windows 10, both Home and Professional
  • Created new install media using both USB flash drives and DVD
  • Tried all USB ports for connecting install media
  • Tried all drives in uninitialized, initialized, unformatted, and formatted states
Plus a few other things that didn't work or may be too lengthy and/or insignificant to mention.

I suspect the motherboard may be the culprit, but it appears to be functional in every other respect. I would definitely appreciate any suggestions you could send my way.

Thanks!
All those drives had a single blank area for Windows like from step 4 here https://appuals.com/how-to-fix-error-0x80300024-when-installing-windows/ ?

That is the most common issue for that error I have seen, the partition is not setup correctly. I usually start with a single unformatted partition and just click Next to have Windows format it and install automatically.
 

true blue 2

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Mar 1, 2015
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Thanks for your reply Rokinamerica.

While I was pretty sure I’d tried everything in that article, I went through it step by step to be sure. The first problem I ran into was that this laptop has a UEFI only bios, with no options for a standard legacy mode. In this instance, it will not let me set a blank HDD as a boot device. The Windows Boot Manager must be present on the HDD before the bios will recognize it as a legit boot device. I do have the option to enable CSM and then set the HDD as the boot device, but that prevents me from creating a GPT partition table, which is required for a UEFI bios running Windows 10. I don’t know if this scenario is true with all computers/motherboards, but it definitely proved to be the case here.

Anyway, I worked through all the suggested methods. As I’m fairly adept with Microsoft Diskpart, I used it instead of AOMEI Partition Assistant for method 3, with no success. In fact, any of the steps in method 3 that I was actually able to try were interrupted by I/O errors, regardless of which of my available drives I used.

I still suspect I may have a motherboard/firmware issue here, but I don’t want to purchase another motherboard just to test my theory, as most places will not RMA them if it doesn’t fix my issue. Additionally, now that I’ve upgraded to bios version 309, I can’t downgrade to experiment with earlier versions.

Thanks again. I really appreciate any suggestions you folks may have, whether they ultimately work or not.
 
Reactions: Rokinamerica

true blue 2

Honorable
Mar 1, 2015
39
1
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All those drives had a single blank area for Windows like from step 4 here https://appuals.com/how-to-fix-error-0x80300024-when-installing-windows/ ?

That is the most common issue for that error I have seen, the partition is not setup correctly. I usually start with a single unformatted partition and just click Next to have Windows format it and install automatically.
Thanks for your reply hang-the-9.

I’ve already tried that approach. The laptop I’m working with will not format any of my drives during Windows setup, as described in step 4. In fact, it won’t even create a partition on a blank drive so I can format it. I have however, partitioned and formatted the drives using another Windows 10 computer, then installed them in the laptop and tried to run setup, to no avail. Additionally, I can’t even delete an existing partition during setup, as was also suggested in the article. As I mentioned in my original post, I’ve tried all drives in uninitialized, initialized, unformatted, and formatted states. Regardless of the state of the drive, I ultimately end up with the 0x80300024 error. Do I have a problem with my motherboard?
 

hang-the-9

Titan
Moderator
Mar 25, 2010
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Thanks for your reply hang-the-9.

I’ve already tried that approach. The laptop I’m working with will not format any of my drives during Windows setup, as described in step 4. In fact, it won’t even create a partition on a blank drive so I can format it. I have however, partitioned and formatted the drives using another Windows 10 computer, then installed them in the laptop and tried to run setup, to no avail. Additionally, I can’t even delete an existing partition during setup, as was also suggested in the article. As I mentioned in my original post, I’ve tried all drives in uninitialized, initialized, unformatted, and formatted states. Regardless of the state of the drive, I ultimately end up with the 0x80300024 error. Do I have a problem with my motherboard?
Did you contact ASUS support? It may need a driver loaded to the Win 10 setup media, although they may just tell you to use the official ASUS image for that system.
 

true blue 2

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Mar 1, 2015
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Did you contact ASUS support? It may need a driver loaded to the Win 10 setup media, although they may just tell you to use the official ASUS image for that system.
Thanks for your reply hang-the-9.

I haven’t tried ASUS support yet. I was hoping if it were a driver issue, I could find some related articles on the web. The drive interface is simple SATA-3. With prior experience, and lack of relative articles, I was pretty sure (until now) that modern versions of Windows 10 would have the required drivers. I’ve seen this issue on RAID drives, but not on single SATA-3 drives. I appreciate the suggestion. I’ll look into it a little further, but may keep ASUS support as a last resort. The laptop is out of warranty, so the support I get will be limited also.

On another note, I was able to install Windows 10 on the HDD using a similar laptop, then install the HDD back in the problematic laptop. The laptop booted once into Windows Automatic Repair, but eventually failed. It took me to the blue “Choose an option” screen, but died immediately after clicking on “Troubleshoot”. It booted back up to the BIOS screen, and no longer recognized the HDD at all.
 

true blue 2

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Mar 1, 2015
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Hi folks,

My apologies for the delay. I’ve officially thrown in the towel on this one and sent it back to the owner. There seems to be a mysterious and insurmountable hardware based issue with this thing, and I’ve simply ran out of time to work on it. Thank you all for your help.
 

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