[SOLVED] Can't access bios again on asus z790

Nov 26, 2022
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Hi,

I have two issues I could use some advice on.

I built a new rig with an i7 13700k, 32 gb ddr5 ram and an asus prime z790 p mobo. All fine during installation, and it booted into the bios settings. Didn't do much, just set correct date and time and turned on intel rapid storage. Computer recognised all my ssds etc. Plugged in an usb stick with windows to install it.

Turns out the windows install didn't recognise any devices to install on despite bios doing it, so i downloaded intel rapid storage drivers (internet told me to to fix driver issues) but they didn't help. Decided to go back into bios and see if anything could be done there, but alas, nothing but a black screen after pushing del or f2. And now I can't get back into bios, even after clearing cmos.

Tried different display ports, hdmi, displayport and two different displays. Maybe I could download drivers for the M2 or other ssds from their page and try to find them during install, but doesn't address why I can't access bios.

Any thoughts?

UPDATE
I did get the system to install windows and finding the devices, but not by following the ASUS or internet's advice word by word. I did have to download the intel rapid storage and VDM drivers, but none of the recommended drivers made any difference, but by installing every driver that popped up if you uncheck "hide incompatible drivers", the devices popped up. Now I'm deathly scared of turning off the computer though :) No news on the bios front
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Intel rapid storage should never be necessary on ANY system. It simply, isn't. Ever. It is not a required technology for any storage components to work unless you are using Optane devices or are using software RAID.


Are you still not able to access the BIOS, if not then I would recommend that you power off and disconnect ALL drives except the one the OS is installed on and remove the memory except for one stick left in the A2 slot. Then do a hard reset of the BIOS as outlined below and then see if you are able to get into the BIOS. You will want to begin rapid fire spamming the delete or F2 key, whatever is required on that board to access the BIOS, as soon as you power the system back on.

How old is that AX760 power supply, because Corsair hasn't sold an AX model with a 760w capacity for MANY years, and I think there is at least a moderate chance that this could be related to your problem. Yes, you can still occasionally find the AX760 for sale from time to time, but they will be VERY old stock that has been sitting around unsold for years and years and are very likely to have seriously aged capacitors which is obviously an undesirable condition. Keep in mind, a power supply has many different power rails involved in supplying power, including 3v, 5v and often multiple different 12v rails as well. Any one of them can have a problem and yet the PSU might SEEM as though it's fine, when it really is not.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the BIOS to fully reset and force recreation of the hardware tables.
 
Nov 26, 2022
2
0
10
0
Thanks for replying, they are as follows,

ASUS PRIME Z790-P WIFI
Corsair Vengeance 32GB (2x16GB) / 5600MHz / DDR5 / CL36 /
Corsair PowerSupply (PSU) AX760 760W 80 PLUS Platinum
Kingston NV2 M.2 1TB PCI Express 4
Crucial MX500 1TB SATA 2.5" 7mm
Samsung SSD 750 EVO 120GB
Samsung 840 Series SSD 250GB SATA3
Kingston A400 240GB 2.5" SATA SSD
Arctic Liquid Freezer II 420
Intel Core i7 13700K 3.4 GHz 54MB
ASUS TUF GeForce RTX 3070 Ti Gaming 8GB

(it irks me so much that I got in once to bios, then never again. It reads the usb with windows on just fine, but can't find the storage devices that bios finds.)
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Intel rapid storage should never be necessary on ANY system. It simply, isn't. Ever. It is not a required technology for any storage components to work unless you are using Optane devices or are using software RAID.


Are you still not able to access the BIOS, if not then I would recommend that you power off and disconnect ALL drives except the one the OS is installed on and remove the memory except for one stick left in the A2 slot. Then do a hard reset of the BIOS as outlined below and then see if you are able to get into the BIOS. You will want to begin rapid fire spamming the delete or F2 key, whatever is required on that board to access the BIOS, as soon as you power the system back on.

How old is that AX760 power supply, because Corsair hasn't sold an AX model with a 760w capacity for MANY years, and I think there is at least a moderate chance that this could be related to your problem. Yes, you can still occasionally find the AX760 for sale from time to time, but they will be VERY old stock that has been sitting around unsold for years and years and are very likely to have seriously aged capacitors which is obviously an undesirable condition. Keep in mind, a power supply has many different power rails involved in supplying power, including 3v, 5v and often multiple different 12v rails as well. Any one of them can have a problem and yet the PSU might SEEM as though it's fine, when it really is not.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the BIOS to fully reset and force recreation of the hardware tables.
 

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