Question Can't install new version of Windows on a Ryzen PC

Jun 24, 2019
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So today I wanted to play some LoL and so I tried to launch the client. The client opened but closed right away leaving some kind of crash report. Soon the screen started getting black every few seconds. I tried ctrl+alt+del but it didn't work and so the pc froze. I forced a shut down and tried to restart but again it didn't work; after the Windows logo screen went black. The weird thing is I could still see my mouse and it was loading something. I reset the uefi to factory settings. Nothing worked so I decided to just reinstall windows. I created the boot drive and tried to install windows but if I booted from UEFI: Kingston it wouldn't let me install Windows on my SSD, if however I tried booting from just Kingston the installation would start, but the PC froze after 1min 25sec. I bypassed whatever was causing the issue launching the setup.exe with cmd, but then it would freeze on Gigabyte logo. Tried pulling out every unnecessary part and tinkered in the uefi without success. I am yet to try installing it with iso image and rufus, but I feel like it's the new version of Windows that's causing the issue. Just updated yesterday. Should've left updates disabled.
R3 1200
RX460
AX370M-Gaming3
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
First, make sure you have the latest motherboard BIOS version installed.

Second, read this and then follow the instructions EXACTLY as outlined. You may need to try different installation media as well. A flash drive would be preferable.

Also, you MUST disconnect ALL USB storage devices except the installation media, so any USB external hard drives must be disconnected, or at least that was the last word I heard from Microsoft for the most recent build version.

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4500988/windows-update-hold-for-windows-10

 
Jun 24, 2019
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I'll make sure to update the bios. Heard there's a good chance to brick the mobo so I hesitated. I also unplugged everything except keyboard and mouse from the peripherals and ssd from drives. I have followed the same guide you linked. Also, why is it that when I was installing windows last year, there was no need to change the settings in bios, unplug stuff etc.?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Because Microsoft likes to change the rules (In regard to having to unplug external storage devices now. That's their new "thing"., to protect YOU I guess), and hardware that is new often requires that support be added to the BIOS in order to be supported, since the compatibility instructions in the BIOS is generally written to support standards or hardware that is current at the time. When something new comes along, whether it is hardware or software based, it sometimes needs to have newer instructions or code for it to be added to the BIOS. And sometimes it doesn't. It might not be BIOS related at all, but it's usually a good idea to keep the BIOS up to date unlike the old days when you only did it if there was a major problem.

These days manufacturers almost use BIOS updates as the time type of tool as a driver update, and sometimes when drivers get updated because of new hardware sometimes it just won't work with an older BIOS. So to avoid that as even being a issue we usually recommend being up to date. Bricking a motherboard from a BIOS update these days pretty much only happens if there was already a problem with the motherboard (In which case you shouldn't TRY to update, until the problem is identified and resolved, if it is a hardware level problem with the motherboard or another device that is making things crash or unstable) or when somebody gets trigger happy and either uses the wrong BIOS image or pulls the plug in the middle of a BIOS update.

So long as you follow the correct procedures and know what you are doing, and there are plenty of tutorials and video tutorials for any given board model or platform, by manufacturer, that nobody should be doing this without knowing full well HOW to do it before hand.
 
Jun 24, 2019
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I updated the bios to version F31 from May, but the installation still gets stuck either at getting files ready or when rebooting, at windows screen. I saw there are some problems regarding ec fw tool so I opted not to update to F40.
 
Jun 24, 2019
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Uh... I think my windows might be cursed. I tried created a boot drive using rufus and windows iso. I booted from uefi: Kingston and ran setup.exe using cmd because otherwise it would crash on getting files ready. I got past the first installation and my pc restarted. It restarted 4 times (with the new bios, instead of freezing, the pc will restart) like it has no clue what to do. Then the blue loading screen appeared, but it was really mispositioned. Finally the desktop showed, but then dissapeared. I could still see the pointer and move it. Pc then restarted, now showing only black screen. I have also tried using different flash drive, the one I installed the windows with last year. I feel like it would be best to install some distribution of Linux until either me or them manage to fix it.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
There is some kind of hardware issue. NONE of this, NONE, should be necessary to install Windows.

I would create new installation media by downloading the media creation tool again and running it, and choosing "create installation media for another computer" when prompted.

After creating the media, which will require access to another computer I imagine, I would unplug ALL drives except the drive the OS is planned to be installed on. That includes external USB drives as well.

Then do a hard reset of the BIOS as follows:

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings to boot from the flash drive OR select the ONE TIME boot option override to boot from the flash drive if that option exists on your exit menu in the BIOS. That method is preferred, but not essential.

Also, I would set CSM (Compatibility support module) to either Auto or disabled, and find the UEFI settings and set to either UEFI mode or Windows 8/10 under the OS type. Often these settings can be found in or near the secure boot options in the BIOS.

If it turns out to not want to work this way then you can try going back and enabling the CSM setting but I'd leave the UEFI set to either enabled, Windows 8/10 or Auto.

Save settings, exit bios, boot from flash drive, install windows using this exact method.

 
Jun 24, 2019
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I did as you said, still nothing. Same issue occurs. What do you advise, should I call tech support to come and try to fix it or do you think some component is malfunctioning, in which case I'll try to get a replacement. Up until now I thought if the bios registers it, then it means it's working. Is there some kind of program to test the pc without windows. Is this how my bios settings should look like?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
What kind of drive are you trying to install TO, and how old is it? Have you tried another drive, or run any tests on that drive to determine if there is a problem with it?

Tried connecting the target drive to another SATA header or using a different SATA cable?
 
Jun 24, 2019
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It's a Gigabyte 120GB SSD. Bought last year in August. I have tried connecting it to all the different SATA ports available, but the problem persists. Do you know any program I can test my SSD with.
EDIT: I just tried installing windows to a HDD (on the same PC) and the installation still failed at getting files ready. I think this might be a motherboard issue. Should I get it checked?
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Probably IS a motherboard issue. That board should still be under warranty so I'd check with Gigabyte to see if you can get it replaced. Tell them that testing indicates there is a probable issue with the storage controller.

How long ago did you build this system? Have you had problems with it since day one? Have you pulled the CPU to check for bent pins?

Are you using the stock cooler? Have you checked to see that the cooler hasn't come loose on one corner causing it to cock in the socket and maybe affecting the connection of the pins in that way. Happens a lot, especially with aftermarket coolers that are tightened unevenly, but occasionally with a stock cooler that has a busted or loose push pin or clip.

If you bought this as a whole system and it's under warranty, then I'd check with whoever you bought it from.
 
Jun 24, 2019
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So I decided to get the system checked tomorrow. I'll explain them the issue and hopefully they'll find out what's the problem exactly.
I built the system by myself in August last year. It was my first build, but I tried to get into it as educated as possible and have experienced no problems whatsoever in terms of stability. One thing I noticed tough is that whenever I applied xmp or overclocked the cpu, my pc would get stuck in a restart loop. Switching the power off on the psu for few seconds would fix the problem.
I haven't checked for bent pins because I don't have any thermal paste on hand and because I haven't moved my pc at all and neither was it moved the day it died. I am using the stock cooler and I just checked - the screws are tight like on day one. I clean it regularly from dust.
All components are still under warranty so hopefully I'll either get a refund or a new component. The thing that's bothering me the most is that I didn't expect it to fail so early, like it's not even a full year old.
Anyways thank you so much for your time, help and effort. I'll post how it went when the pc is fixed and hopefully this thread will be of some use to someone in the future. I'm sorry it turned out to be a hardware issue, as your work might be for nothing. Also, it was nice to have a chat in English with someone.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Have you tried doing a hard reset, and THEN attempting the install? Sometimes just setting the BIOS back to the factory defaults will fix the problem with installations. I'd try that first before taking it in. Don't make any changes in the BIOS after resetting it. Just power off, pull the CMOS battery for five minutes during which press the power button for about 30 seconds continuously. Then put the CMOS battery back in, start the system, go into the bios and select the option to load default or optimal default settings.

Then, if your BIOS has the one time option to bypass the normal boot sequence, choose your flash drive from the list and boot from that. Most newer boards like yours have that option, and have for several generations. It's usually at the bottom of the boot order or save settings page. If not, then put the flash drive as the first boot device.

Worth trying anyhow. For what it's worth, it might also be worth trying a different flash drive to create the installation media on or creating the installation media all over again. I've seen plenty of installations fail due to bad flash drives (Even brand new ones) or corrupt installation media.

It might also be worth creating Memtest86 boot media and testing the memory. Unless you prefer to just hand it off to a repair shop and let them figure it out. Either way, let me know what happens. Good luck.
 
Jun 24, 2019
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I ran memtest and it finished with 0 errors. Am I mistaken or it means my ram and cpu are fine? I also did hard reset and again tried installing using different flash drives. None worked so I brought it to the store I bought it in for diagnostics as I can fix it myself if I know which part to replace. They charge $20 for diagnostics and were kind enough to hear what's my problem. It'll probably be worth it, considering I was really left out of options. I'm curious to see what component was the guilty party, but I'd be so upset if they actually managed to install the Windows.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
How many passes of Memtest did you do? Four passes are the minimum requirement (And is the maximum you CAN do on the free version) to say "Yeah, the memory is PROBABLY fine. I've still seen memory issues with sticks that passed Memtest AND Windows memory diagnostic AND Prime95 Blend testing. SO there are zero certainties, but it makes it a lot less likely that memory CONFIGURATION is the problem, and somewhat less likely that it's a physical memory issue.

Honestly, I think this is a problem with the motherboard or one of the drives. Or maybe even the flash drive or a cable. Something related to storage control or a physical problem on the motherboard.
 
Jun 24, 2019
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I ran it for 2-ish hours. That was 6 or 7 passes (I ran 2 tests). I didn't have enough time to let it run for like a whole day as some people suggest.
I didn't expect nor ask for you to say something like that with apsolute certainty, because that'd be unreasonable. I don't have as much experience so I didn't know how much does 2 hours mean in terms of being sure that memory and cpu are working properly.
About the drives, I think they're not the problem as the same issue occurred on 2 of my other drives that I can say with apsolute certainty are working properly.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
For future reference, a whole day is nonsense. Four consecutive passes is all the free version will allow and it is all that is required to find most problems, if it's going to find them at all. The paid version has some tests that more quickly identify, or identify problems not typical but possible, than what the free version does, but honestly if it passes four passes of Memtest the problem is not going to be something that is happening often or is obvious. It would be along the lines of something behind the scenes that you'd never notice except as an occasionally random event or micro errors that wouldn't show up until they've cumulatively caused a problem down the road.

Not going to cause a failure to install windows if it didn't show up within one pass most likely.

You do not have ANY other drives attached except the drive you are installing to and the drive you are installing from, correct?

The drive you are installing TO is attached to THIS header on the motherboard, correct?






And all external USB devices are disconnected except the mouse and keyboard? That includes any Bluetooth devices or drives.

You've tried a different SATA cable to the target drive?

If you've done all of that, then yes, take it in I guess. My assumption is a bad motherboard, but it could be a graphics card or power supply issue as well. Or some kind of driver problem. Hard to know that with what you've got to work with though unless you have another graphics card you can try, a different power supply or another AM4 motherboard.
 
Jun 24, 2019
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I already took it in earlier today as I tried everything you mentioned. I shuffled the sata ports and cables, I disconnected my case fans, pulled out the WiFi card, disconnected everything except main monitor, keyboard, mouse, flash drive and ssd.
I don't really have much to work with in terms of spare components and I'd rather pay them $20 instead of disassembling my friends pc just so I can troubleshoot.
About the memtest, I don't know how reliable it is so I took for granted what I saw on similar threads, but I do understand some people tend to go over the top with these kinds of tests.
 
Jun 24, 2019
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I just got a call from the store. It was actually the CPU. So, you got that right, there are absolutely NO certainties. Good thing is that I got a new CPU. But this is a plot twist for sure. Anyways it's finnaly fixed so I just want to thank you for all the help and advice you've given me.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Did they say what the problem WAS with the CPU? Was it bent pins? You can definitely bend pins and still have a functional system that might get worse over time due to the weight and fulcrum stress of the CPU cooler, or due to moving the unit from place to place. Pretty unusual for a CPU to just "fail" without an external factor involved.

My guess, as I suggested earlier in the thread, would be that there was a bent pin.
 

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