Question Can't overclock past 4.05 on ryzen 3600 on msi x570 A pro and need advice on fan curve

David_24

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I can't change voltage all I can do is turn on auto overclocking. I'm also thermal throttling a lot. I moved the fan curve around to make it quiet when cool but I don't really know where to leave some of the settings.
I have a gtx 2060super
plat 750 watt psu. supernova

How do I get to 4.3ghz ryzen 3600. how do i stop thermal throttling?

Would downloading a new mobo driver help
?
 

jon96789

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Really bad news for you...

It is a known fact (do a search on X570 motherboards on YouTube posted by Hardware Unboxed) that the MSi Gaming Edge, Gaming Pro and the A-Pro motherboards have probably the worst (i.e. cheapest) voltage regulator implementation of all the X570 boards (all three boards have the same VRM design, differing only in heat sink design), using only a 4+2 design (their Gaming Pro Carbon (which i unfortunately have) is almost as bad with a 5+2 design). Their tests showed that the Asus Prime X570P motherboard VRMs hit 66 degrees while the MSI A-Pro hit 115 degrees, almost 50 degrees hotter. The MSi board failed their testing by automatically and constantly throttling back the CPU.

Because of the crappy VRM, the MSi VRMs overheat reaching over 100 degrees C. That causes the CPU to thermal throttle, especially when you have a higher end AMD 3000 series CPU and more so when you try to overclock the CPU. Boards with better VRM designs normally run about 60-70 degrees which can handle the increased voltages when overclocking.

Sadly, the only way to get around your problem is to buy a different motherboard that has a better VRM design.
 

David_24

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Aug 26, 2015
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Really bad news for you...

It is a known fact (do a search on X570 motherboards on YouTube posted by Hardware Unboxed) that the MSi Gaming Edge, Gaming Pro and the A-Pro motherboards have probably the worst (i.e. cheapest) voltage regulator implementation of all the X570 boards (all three boards have the same VRM design, differing only in heat sink design), using only a 4+2 design (their Gaming Pro Carbon (which i unfortunately have) is almost as bad with a 5+2 design). Their tests showed that the Asus Prime X570P motherboard VRMs hit 66 degrees while the MSI A-Pro hit 115 degrees, almost 50 degrees hotter. The MSi board failed their testing by automatically and constantly throttling back the CPU.

Because of the crappy VRM, the MSi VRMs overheat reaching over 100 degrees C. That causes the CPU to thermal throttle, especially when you have a higher end AMD 3000 series CPU and more so when you try to overclock the CPU. Boards with better VRM designs normally run about 60-70 degrees which can handle the increased voltages when overclocking.

Sadly, the only way to get around your problem is to buy a different motherboard that has a better VRM design.
I thought what with revieweres not even getting these boards ahead of time all those times the industry does that why even look for a review before i buy a 200 dollar board right.
 
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How do I get to 4.3ghz ryzen 3600. how do i stop thermal throttling?
...
What cooler are you using?

You'll need extremely good cooling and be lucky at the silicon lottery to get 4.3G on a 3600. Don't even attempt it on the stock cooler.

You'll also have to do it on manual overclocking, not the auto-overclocking tool. Increase mult to 43.0, volts as high as you can stand it and watch it crash then increase it more and see if it holds. Even if you do get it to boot and play a game it won't get you far in a stress test... but it's something to tell your grand kids.

But I wouldn't worry so much about VRM on that board. Yes, MSI's X570 boards (except the super-premiums) arguably have the worst VRMs but you're not attempting this with a 12 core or 16 core monster processor either. For a 3600, this should work well enough. Except I really wonder why you think 4.3G, 100Mhz over it's rated max boost, is an achievable over-clock.
 
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David_24

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What cooler are you using?

You'll need extremely good cooling and be lucky at the silicon lottery to get 4.3G on a 3600. Don't even attempt it on the stock cooler.

You'll also have to do it on manual overclocking, not the auto-overclocking tool. Increase mult to 43.0, volts as high as you can stand it and watch it crash then increase it more and see if it holds. Even if you do get it to boot and play a game it won't get you far in a stress test... but it's something to tell your grand kids.

But I wouldn't worry so much about VRM on that board. Yes, MSI's X570 boards (except the super-premiums) arguably have the worst VRMs but you're not attempting this with a 12 core or 16 core monster processor either. For a 3600, this should work well enough. Except I really wonder why you think 4.3G, 100Mhz over it's rated max boost, is an achievable over-clock.
"That story continues down the Ryzen 3000 range: the top 20% of 8-core Ryzen 7 3800X CPUs could push to 4.3GHz (on 1.3V), and 53% could reach 4.25GHz (1.287V), with all chips able to hit 4.2GHz (1.275V). "

I'm using a nh d14. noctua so best thing out there really.

I overclocked it to 4.3 and I couldn't get my monitor to display. I gotta go back in there and oc this thing right.
I'll do it at 4.2 ghz. What do you think my voltage should be? How do I try different oc without loosing access to my monitor

If the vrms themselves get that hot could it really thermal throttle? they must be rated higher right?
 

David_24

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"That story continues down the Ryzen 3000 range: the top 20% of 8-core Ryzen 7 3800X CPUs could push to 4.3GHz (on 1.3V), and 53% could reach 4.25GHz (1.287V), with all chips able to hit 4.2GHz (1.275V). "

I'm using a nh d14. noctua so best thing out there really.

I overclocked it to 4.3 and I couldn't get my monitor to display. I fixed it by pulling the mobo battery. its fine now. I gotta go back in there and oc this thing right.
I'll do it at 4.2 ghz. What do you think my voltage should be? How do I try different oc without loosing access to my monitor

If the vrms themselves get that hot could it really thermal throttle? they must be rated higher right?
 
"That story continues down the Ryzen 3000 range: the top 20% of 8-core Ryzen 7 3800X CPUs could push to 4.3GHz (on 1.3V), and 53% could reach 4.25GHz (1.287V), with all chips able to hit 4.2GHz (1.275V). "

I'm using a nh d14. noctua so best thing out there really.

I overclocked it to 4.3 and I couldn't get my monitor to display. I gotta go back in there and oc this thing right.
I'll do it at 4.2 ghz. What do you think my voltage should be? How do I try different oc without loosing access to my monitor

If the vrms themselves get that hot could it really thermal throttle? they must be rated higher right?
But you've a 3600, not a 3800X. 3800X's are binned for much higher clocks, at lower volts, than 3600's.

Personally, I think you should shoot for a 4.1Ghz for a manual all-core overclock on a 3600. If you get that stable then start increasing it and don't expect to get it at 1.3 V... more like 1.375 V or more. At 4.2 Ghz I'd expect it to need maybe 1.47-1.48 V and only be stable under moderate load.

For an all-core, 24/7, overclock that's a voltage range where you got to be asking yourself: "how long will this processor last?" That's even considering AMD is comfortable with the processor reaching for 1.5V because that's under light loads only, a few mS at a boost.

Still, with Ry3K it depends extremely much on what your silicon sample is like. That's why you should start at something achievably low and then march it up. Increasing volts as you go.
 

David_24

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Aug 26, 2015
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But you've a 3600, not a 3800X. 3800X's are binned for much higher clocks, at lower volts, than 3600's.

Personally, I think you should shoot for a 4.1Ghz for a manual all-core overclock on a 3600. If you get that stable then start increasing it and don't expect to get it at 1.3 V... more like 1.375 V or more. At 4.2 Ghz I'd expect it to need maybe 1.47-1.48 V and only be stable under moderate load.

For an all-core, 24/7, overclock that's a voltage range where you got to be asking yourself: "how long will this processor last?" That's even considering AMD is comfortable with the processor reaching for 1.5V because that's under light loads only, a few mS at a boost.

Still, with Ry3K it depends extremely much on what your silicon sample is like. That's why you should start at something achievably low and then march it up. Increasing volts as you go.
what about my problem with the monitor. I dont wanna have to keep popping the battery out.
 

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