[SOLVED] Can't remove PSU: can I get auxiliary power for graphics card?

Nov 28, 2020
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Earlier this year I bought a gaming PC off eBay.

HP Intel Core i7 3.8GHz/GTX 1060/SSD/12GB RAM/1TB HDD

However, when playing 3D games, the computer would suddenly shut down and the fan would go into overdrive.

I brought my computer to the local shop, and their diagnosis was that the PSU (320 W) was insufficient for the GTX 1060 graphics card. They pointed to the fact that its six-pin outlet plugged into a SATA cable as evidence. However, they said they couldn't change the power supply, due to it being a "proprietary device" from HP.

Is this "a thing" with HP computers? If so, what are my options? Can I add extra power without replacing the PSU?

Thanks!
Andrew
 

NightHawkRMX

Polypheme
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Yes, HP is probably about the worst with proprietary power supplies. Its really not an option to replace it, and the sata to 6 pin adapter the ebay seller used on that undersized PSU is downright dangerous.

Your only real choice is to remove the 1060
 
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NightHawkRMX

Polypheme
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Yes, HP is probably about the worst with proprietary power supplies. Its really not an option to replace it, and the sata to 6 pin adapter the ebay seller used on that undersized PSU is downright dangerous.

Your only real choice is to remove the 1060
 
Reactions: JoBalz

NightHawkRMX

Polypheme
Ambassador
Its a 12 volt only PSU, where normal PSUs provide more than just 12v. They are essentially using the motherboards SATA connector to power a GPU. Its definitely not designed to provide enough current for that. Not to mention, 320w is below the 400w minimum Nvidia recommends for a system with a 1060.

The current PSU does appear to be standard ATX sized, so you could put an upgraded ATX PSU in the same spot, but it wouldn't be able to connect to the motherboard without an adapter, which isn't a great idea, but it can work. What is the model number of this PC?

Ideally you would want to replace that entire system, but I understand that might not be possible.
 
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Nov 28, 2020
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The current PSU does appear to be standard ATX sized, so you could put an upgraded ATX PSU in the same spot, but it wouldn't be able to connect to the motherboard without an adapter, which isn't a great idea, but it can work. What is the model number of this PC?
Thanks for the explanation. The product number is QV983AV (HP Compaq 6300 Pro MT PC)

What are the reasons that connecting to the motherboard with an adapter would be a bad idea?

Otherwise, any thoughts on the most cost-effective course of action? (Replace the system but keep the card? Keep the system but replace the card?)
 
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DSzymborski

Polypheme
Moderator
Thanks for the explanation. The product number is QV983AV (HP Compaq 6300 Pro MT PC)

What are the reasons that connecting to the motherboard with an adapter would be a bad idea?



Otherwise, any thoughts on the most cost-effective course of action? (Replace the system but keep the card? Keep the system but replace the card?)
Ditch the case and the motherboard and do a transplant. Can't recommend a specific replacement motherboard because "i7 3.8 GHz" is not a specific CPU.
 
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Nov 28, 2020
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Ditch the case and the motherboard and do a transplant. Can't recommend a specific replacement motherboard because "i7 3.8 GHz" is not a specific CPU.
Thanks. According to my 'System Information', the processor is:

Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-2600 CPU @ 3.40GHz, 3401 Mhz, 4 Core(s), 8 Logical Processor(s)

Apologies if this is a stupid question: can you replace the motherboard but keep the CPU? If I replaced the case and motherboard, what components would I be able to keep (and hopefully save money by not replacing)?
 

bignastyid

Titan
Moderator
Aslong as you get a decently built adapter and a good PSU the chances of it going bad are small. Especially if just used temporarily till you can do a case and platform upgrade.

You can replace the motherboard and use your current cpu, however you'd also need a new case as the current case and motherboard are non standard(atx motherboard won't fit the case).
 
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JoBalz

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Sep 1, 2014
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Yes, HP is probably about the worst with proprietary power supplies. Its really not an option to replace it, and the sata to 6 pin adapter the ebay seller used on that undersized PSU is downright dangerous.

Your only real choice is to remove the 1060
HP and Dell both like to use proprietary PSUs that can only be replaced with another made by the company (usually at far higher prices than a standard ATX PSU). My sister has an HP and since it's old, I convinced her to let me refurbish my prior computer, which I built myself using all standard components and will be plenty for the way she uses her computer. I'd say to simply buy a new case and transfer the components from the HP to it. However, it is possible that HP (like some Dells) may have used a proprietary motherboard that may or may not align properly with the motherboard standoffs in an aftermarket case.

If funds are tight, you can certainly check eBay for a motherboard with the proper socket for the CPU and DRAM used in the HP, as has been outlined in another comment. But in the long run, if you like gaming, it's probably time to consider upgrading to a late model Intel CPU and motherboard, or an AMD Ryzen Zen 2 or Zen 3 CPU and a B450 or B550 motherboard. If you can shop for parts around the late November-December holiday period, you can often find some very good deals (I started picking up parts last December for the new rig I built in March of this year, a few pieces per month as I could budget it in).

Frankly, outside of a laptop, I haven't bought a pre-built desktop since the mid-90s when I had an IBM PC that had the same problem with a proprietary power supply, and IBM no longer made. After that I took an online course on PC building and have never looked back!
 
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