Capturing VHS, Do I have to deinterlace?

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Mike wrote:

> After capturing from VHS, should I deinterlace before burning to DVD?


Definately not.


-WD
 
G

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Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

> After capturing from VHS, should I deinterlace before burning to DVD?
>
You should NEVER deinterlace for DVD, but depending on the source material,
you might want to IVTC.
 
G

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Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

> please explain what IVTC is, I'm new to all of this
>
The short explanation is that if you are capturing something that was
originally made for film, such as movies, TV shows, cartoons, etc, the
original frame rate is almost always 23.976 fps, and a process called
Telecine was used to convert it to 29.97 fps for NTSC transmission, and
25fps for PAL. You use a process called Inverse Telecine to recover the
original 23.976 frames. The advantage of doing this is that you get a
theoretical 20% increase in quality, as you only have to encode 23.976
frames per second, instead of 29.976. This is less of an issue with PAL, but
I won't go into why here.

IVTC isn't difficult at all. All you have to do is determine whether your
source material is appropriate for IVTC or not, and then the software will
take care of the rest for you. I recommend AviSynth + DeComb for this.

Material that is not suitable for IVTC include home-video, sports, the news,
talk shows, and anything else that would have been filmed on interlaced
video. There is no 100% rule of thumb about this, but once you know what to
look for, it's quite easy to spot.

Another thing: If your source is VHS, you don't need to use full D1 - 720 x
480 - resolution. Half D1 - 352 x 480 - is legal DVD spec and will look
almost identical, possibly better than full D1, as VHS resolution doesn't
come close to taking full advantage of the higher resolution, and at 352 you
can get away with a much lower bitrate and fit more onto a disc. Anywhere
between 2000-3000kbit/sec should give you pretty good results if you use a
good encoder like TMPGenc, ProCoder or CCE. You should easily be able to get
around 3 hours on a disc, give or take.
 
G

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Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

> You should NEVER deinterlace for DVD, but depending on the source
material,
> you might want to IVTC.

Absolutely correct - particularly for stuff like camcorder or TV sports
captures. You should compress your video with an MPEG2 encoder which allows
you to choose something like 'Field Order A' or 'Field Order B' or maybe
'Upper field first' / 'Lower Field First' You might need to try both
options to see which one is right for your captured video.
 

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