Question Case Fans Models and setup

Oct 17, 2021
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Hey,
I have SPC Regnum 4TF case, with 3 stock fans installed. This thing can hold:
Rear: one 120mm fan
Front: three 120mm fans / two 140mm
Top: two 120/140mm fans
(Of course you can find full specs online c:)
I would like to make cooling in this computer much more efficient by replacing & buying additional fans (my gpu temps are going insane during these hot days, even on undervolt...)
Should top fans be blowing air inside or outside the case?
What fans should i buy? Can you propose exact models and configuration?
Thanks!
 

Lafong

Respectable
Hey,
I have SPC Regnum 4TF case, with 3 stock fans installed. This thing can hold:
Rear: one 120mm fan
Front: three 120mm fans / two 140mm
Top: two 120/140mm fans
(Of course you can find full specs online c:)
I would like to make cooling in this computer much more efficient by replacing & buying additional fans (my gpu temps are going insane during these hot days, even on undervolt...)
Should top fans be blowing air inside or outside the case?
What fans should i buy? Can you propose exact models and configuration?
Thanks!
Without actual experimentation, all is conjecture.

Depending on things like your case design, CPU, CPU load, graphics card, ambient temperatures, CPU cooler characteristics, your budget, your tolerance for noise, your fear of temps being "too high", the particular case fans you choose, etc.

6 fans may be no better than 3 or 4.

Do you have a rough fan budget?

Which would annoy you more: fan noise or "my temps are too high"? If you are very antsy about temps, you may have to tolerate more noise. Improve one to the detriment of the other, all other things equal.
 
Oct 17, 2021
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I dont care that much about noise, I would rather make everything cool (83 deg celsius is pretty high, isn't it? :p), CPU cooler is SPC Fera3 but CPU temps are not problem here. My budget isn't that big, I would rather go for cheap way, just to make those temps more reasonable.
 

geofelt

Titan
What is the make/model of your gpu?
First of all, graphics cards do run hot, but they are built to do so.
80c. is a normal target temperature. The gpu will run as strong as it can so long as the temp is kept to 80c.
The key to good cooling is to get good airflow INTO the case.
In time it will all exit the case, taking component heat with it.
Since your case supports 140mm intakes, that is what I would do.
140mm fans move more air at lower rpm.
I would normally go with noctua 1500 rpm fans:
https://www.newegg.com/noctua-nf-p14s-redux-1500-pwm/p/N82E16835608065?quicklink=true
If you want faster, you can go for 3000 RPM barn burners:
https://www.newegg.com/noctua-nf-a14-ippc-3000-pwm-case-fan/p/N82E16835608048?quicklink=true
You can slow down a fast fan, but can not speed up a slow fan.

On the rest of the system, only install whatever 120mm fan you have as a rear exit fan.
The purpose is mainly to direct the incoming airflow over the motherboard, cpu cooler and gpu.
Leave the top open.
If you put exit fans there, they will divert the airflow out the top before reaching what you want to cool.
 
Oct 17, 2021
17
1
15
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What is the make/model of your gpu?
First of all, graphics cards do run hot, but they are built to do so.
80c. is a normal target temperature. The gpu will run as strong as it can so long as the temp is kept to 80c.
The key to good cooling is to get good airflow INTO the case.
In time it will all exit the case, taking component heat with it.
Since your case supports 140mm intakes, that is what I would do.
140mm fans move more air at lower rpm.
I would normally go with noctua 1500 rpm fans:
https://www.newegg.com/noctua-nf-p14s-redux-1500-pwm/p/N82E16835608065?quicklink=true
If you want faster, you can go for 3000 RPM barn burners:
https://www.newegg.com/noctua-nf-a14-ippc-3000-pwm-case-fan/p/N82E16835608048?quicklink=true
You can slow down a fast fan, but can not speed up a slow fan.

On the rest of the system, only install whatever 120mm fan you have as a rear exit fan.
The purpose is mainly to direct the incoming airflow over the motherboard, cpu cooler and gpu.
Leave the top open.
If you put exit fans there, they will divert the airflow out the top before reaching what you want to cool.
GPU model is Gigabyte RTX 2060Super windforce. A couple of days ago card broke down second time due to VRAM failure. I will probably never ever buy gigabyte gpus again... I was holding it below 80c most of the time.
Meanwhile friends on RX6600XT are chilling at ~65c.

What if i put inlet fans on top? will it help, or its just not worht it?

Are there other, less expensive fans? Just asking.
And should i use stock outlet fan, or should I replace it with something slightly better?

41decibels...yikes. Its wild.....
 

geofelt

Titan
GPU model is Gigabyte RTX 2060Super windforce. A couple of days ago card broke down second time due to VRAM failure. I will probably never ever buy gigabyte gpus again... I was holding it below 80c most of the time.
Meanwhile friends on RX6600XT are chilling at ~65c.

What if i put inlet fans on top? will it help, or its just not worht it?

Are there other, less expensive fans? Just asking.
And should i use stock outlet fan, or should I replace it with something slightly better?

41decibels...yikes. Its wild.....
All gpu internals will come from amd or nvidia.
What gigabyte, asus/evga.. contribute is mostly the cooling systems and perhaps some factory overclocking and customer support.
Putting fans on top, either intakes or exhausts will likely be counter productive.
What you want is good airflow.

Plus, multiple intakes will lessen the case cleaning capability of a positive pressure front intake setup.

I did not recommend 3000 fans unless you are paranoid about cooling and are partially deaf.
But, 1200 RPM fans are not loud.
Noctua makes top quality fans, but there are others who make decent fans also.
No need to replace the stock exhaust fan.
The airflow pressure comes from the good intakes.

None of this is cast in concrete.
Start with what you have and see how it goes.
I would favor upping intake capability before exhaust capability.
 
Last edited:
Oct 17, 2021
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All gpu internals will come from amd or nvidia.
What gigabyte, asus/evga.. contribute is mostly the cooling systems and perhaps some factory overclocking and customer support.
Putting fans on top, either intakes or exhausts will likely be counter productive.
What you want is good airflow.

Plus, multiple intakes will lessen the case cleaning capability of a positive pressure front intake setup.

I did not recommend 3000 fans unless you are paranoid about cooling and are partially deaf.
But, 1200 fans are not loud.
Noctua makes top quality fans, but there are others who make decent fans also.
No need to replace the stock exhaust fan.
The airflow pressure comes from the good intakes.

None of this is cast in concrete.
Start with what you have and see how it goes.
I would favor upping intake capability before exhaust capability.
I thought that nvidia/amd only provide core and some thrash... Thanks.
I will consider going with slow noctuas or maybe Be Quiet Pure Wings 2 High Speed? I can always slow them down, and they are cheaper. Any other good fans?
Thanks for sharing ur knowledge, maybe my PC won't cook gpu again.
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
Looks like a good case...
Methinks part of this has to do with the 2060 Windforce's directional finstack.
They function as air guides. These are aimed to exit out the front and back, unlike many other open air models which are aimed at the sides.

The back exhaust shouldn't be a problem, but the front fan is likely creating turbulence with the front exhaust; working against it and increasing gpu core temperatures.

Maybe skipping the front-middle fan as shown in the diagram above will help.
 
Oct 17, 2021
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Looks like a good case...
Methinks part of this has to do with the 2060 Windforce's directional finstack.
They function as air guides. These are aimed to exit out the front and back, unlike many other open air models which are aimed at the sides.

The back exhaust shouldn't be a problem, but the front fan is likely creating turbulence with the front exhaust; working against it and increasing gpu core temperatures.

Maybe skipping the front-middle fan as shown in the diagram above will help.
So, you propose to move middle-front fan to top-front position, and not putting anything here? This way, I will have to put 120mm fans here (probably) instead of 140mm (I dont know what is their placement at the moment, I will look into case when I return home). Any good 120mm models?
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
So, you propose to move middle-front fan to top-front position, and not putting anything here?
Yes.


Any good 120mm models?
Didn't the case come with three 120mm fans? Well, at least it says so in the product description... what's wrong with those? They should do fine, since the case is meshed out.

Put 2 of them in the front - skip the middle space, of course - and install the 3rd one behind the cpu cooler. Then see if that helped gpu thermals.
 
Oct 17, 2021
17
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Yes.



Didn't the case come with three 120mm fans? Well, at least it says so in the product description... what's wrong with those? They should do fine, since the case is meshed out.

Put 2 of them in the front - skip the middle space, of course - and install the 3rd one behind the cpu cooler. Then see if that helped gpu thermals.
I will do so, but for now I cannot test thermals because of broken GPU, I have to RMA it, but Ill wait a month or so untill they return it to me. I dont have another gpu to replace mine. I was just wondering if putting faster spinnie thingies will significantly decrese temps, but you might be right, that the placement is key.
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
I will do so, but for now I cannot test thermals because of broken GPU, I have to RMA it, but Ill wait a month or so untill they return it to me. I dont have another gpu to replace mine. I was just wondering if putting faster spinnie thingies will significantly decrese temps, but you might be right, that the placement is key.
Part of this depends on how far you sit from your PC, but many fans start becoming audible over 1000rpm, so faster isn't always better.
There's also the matter of how we all perceive the tone and hums of fans differently... would be a shame to buy some 1500rpm or higher fans only to still limit them around 1000rpm.

The mesh paneling also makes it so that your fans don't have to work as hard to bring air through the PC... even further driving the point that some new fans may not improve things much.
 
Oct 17, 2021
17
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Part of this depends on how far you sit from your PC, but many fans start becoming audible over 1000rpm, so faster isn't always better.
There's also the matter of how we all perceive the tone and hums of fans differently... would be a shame to buy some 1500rpm or higher fans only to still limit them around 1000rpm.

The mesh paneling also makes it so that your fans don't have to work as hard to bring air through the PC... even further driving the point that some new fans may not improve things much.
I am sitting rather close to PC, it is standing next to me, on a desk. But I have survived cracking PSU fan noise, so a bit louder than usual fans shouldnt be a problem.
 

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