Case Modding: Primer or Not?

electro_neanderthal

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Jan 22, 2018
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So, I have an old PC case that I've been modding, and I've gotten to the point where painting is coming up soon; however, this is my first case mod project.

Essentially, I have a spray-can of "Beauti-Tone Enamel (satin white) Interior/Exterior" paint, and the instructions say nothing on the can about primer, nor a clear coat. A few videos I've watched have said to use primer, but this paint isn't exactly what they've been using.

So should I get primer and/or clear-coat, or am I alright to just use this paint?

My paint: http://homehardware.ca/en/rec/index.htm/Paint-D%C3%A9cor/Paint/Aerosol/Solvent-Base/340g-White-Satin-Solvent-Paint/_/N-2pqfZ67l/Ne-67n/Ntk-All_EN/R-I1720190?Ntt=Beauti-Tone+satin
 
Always primer. It helps the paint adhere. Sand it smooth. Wipe it down with a damp cloth. Since it's probably been handled a lot over the years. I'd also wipe it down with isopropyl alcohol to remove residue. Prime it. Sand it with a fine grit. Wipe it down again. Paint it with light coats. Wet sand between coats with whatever grit the can recommends and wipe down. Probably 800 to 1000. Apply a final coat. Wet sand again. Apply at least two coats of clear coat. The clear coat protects the paint. All the sanding between coats is for a smoother finish. If you want a mirror like finish. You'll need some ultra fine grit polishing paper. If you want a rough surface. Just sand between the primer, paint and clear coats.

Do it all outside or in a well ventilated space. Put down newspaper over a wide area and don't have anything anywhere close by you don't want paint on. The mist drifts some. Wear gloves or you will get spray paint on your hands. It is a pain to remove. Don't wear any clothing you like.
 
Always primer. It helps the paint adhere. Sand it smooth. Wipe it down with a damp cloth. Since it's probably been handled a lot over the years. I'd also wipe it down with isopropyl alcohol to remove residue. Prime it. Sand it with a fine grit. Wipe it down again. Paint it with light coats. Wet sand between coats with whatever grit the can recommends and wipe down. Probably 800 to 1000. Apply a final coat. Wet sand again. Apply at least two coats of clear coat. The clear coat protects the paint. All the sanding between coats is for a smoother finish. If you want a mirror like finish. You'll need some ultra fine grit polishing paper. If you want a rough surface. Just sand between the primer, paint and clear coats.

Do it all outside or in a well ventilated space. Put down newspaper over a wide area and don't have anything anywhere close by you don't want paint on. The mist drifts some. Wear gloves or you will get spray paint on your hands. It is a pain to remove. Don't wear any clothing you like.
 

electro_neanderthal

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Jan 22, 2018
450
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Alright, thanks for the information. This project just became a lot more expensive (for my budget) :p

I think I'll skip sanding the paint between coats though (I will sand the primer), since the can's instructions are basically: Clean surface, spray on in light coats (apply as many as you need), apply next coat within an hour of the last (or wait 2 days if you miss the hour), and clear the can nozzle to store. And that's it. I'm a little surprised at how few directions are given, as the times I've painted my car (dang rust and parking lot drivers), there were way more instructions on those cans.
 

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