Case-top AIO and 65 Celsius. Something wrong ?

Venom_7

Commendable
Mar 14, 2017
10
0
1,510
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Hi, I'm using Coolermaster ML240L RGB 240mm duel fans AIO on top of my case exhausting air outside the case (upward and I also tried the other way around).

It's a little bit noisy and temperature reaches 65 Celsius with gaming. Anything to do to make it better ?

Note: I'm using an X62 Kraken AIO 280mm for the graphics card with NZXT G12 bracket and temps are less than 50 Celsius on maximum load with overclocking.

Other Specs:

165 Hz oc Asus ROG 1440p monitor
Intel i5 4690k OC at 4.5 GHz
Aorus GTX 1080ti
16 GB ddr3 RAM
ASUS Z97-A MOBO
HP 1 TB M.2 NVM SSD WINDOWS 10
1 TB HDD
PSU 850 watts (Gold)




Update:


1- I've delided the CPU and applied some new thermal paste. (I've scratched my CPU while cleaning it, but on the green surface only).

2- I've bought a new case from Egeira and it's 120mm. Fans were quite quiet (lol.) So I've replaced the original one from Coolermaster.

Result: At first, my PC was acting really weird at start up and windows. But after rebooting multiple times it gotten smooth.

CPU Temps have dropped around 15-20 degree Celsius.

Just curious about your opinion.
Why PC was acting weird ? And what do you think mostly have caused this temp drop ? (Point 1 or point 2)
 
Last edited:

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
A better cooler or a lower overclock.

All seriousness aside, overclocked CPUs will usually spike higher under load, there isn't much you can do about it without spending a lot more on a cooling solution. Also, core temp does not equal coolant temp.

Also, GPU and CPU are designed differently and respond differently to cooling, especially liquid cooling. GPUs are designed for much higher temps using factory air cooling, so when you get a very efficient cooling system (like liquid) the higher wattage moves more effectively away from the GPU core. Liquid cooled GPUs will almost always be much lower by comparison than CPUs also due to the way the core die is readily exposed to a cooling plate vs. the IHS a CPU has to transfer energy to...often through a substrate of thermal compound or solder.
 

Venom_7

Commendable
Mar 14, 2017
10
0
1,510
0
A better cooler or a lower overclock.

All seriousness aside, overclocked CPUs will usually spike higher under load, there isn't much you can do about it without spending a lot more on a cooling solution. Also, core temp does not equal coolant temp.

Also, GPU and CPU are designed differently and respond differently to cooling, especially liquid cooling. GPUs are designed for much higher temps using factory air cooling, so when you get a very efficient cooling system (like liquid) the higher wattage moves more effectively away from the GPU core. Liquid cooled GPUs will almost always be much lower by comparison than CPUs also due to the way the core die is readily exposed to a cooling plate vs. the IHS a CPU has to transfer energy to...often through a substrate of thermal compound or solder.
For the IHS problem, will deliding help ?

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CompuTronix

Judicious
Moderator
For the IHS problem, will deliding help ?
Intel's TIM (Thermal Interface Material) degrades over time into the consistency of chalk.

I recently delidded yet another 4th Generation processor with uncharacteristically high Core temperatures, especially considering that it was running under a Be Quiet Dark Rock 4 Pro, which is an excellent high-end air cooler comparable to 240mm liquid. The user had owned and overclocked the processor since new, and stated the Core temperatures used to be lower, even when running under a less capable air cooler.

Once again we found that Intel's TIM no longer had an effective thermal bond with the top of the Die. Under close examination, a telltale contact pattern on the Die reveals where the hot spots were. This is typically seen when delidding older TIM'd processors. After applying Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut liquid metal, the hottest Core decreased by 22°C, and the deviation between the hottest and coolest Cores decreased from 12°C to 5°C.

The short story is we've found that 3rd through 6th Generation 22 and 14 nanometer processors (launched 2012 through 2015), such as your 4th Generation 4690K, no longer cool as well as when they were new. Delidding solves this problem by not just restoring thermal performance, but also by upgrading thermal performance similar to that of soldered processors such as 2nd Generation and earlier, which remain thermally consistent and predictable.

Delidding will most certainly and definitely solve any thermal problem with your 4690K. Rather than delid with the risky razor blade method, you can safely delid with a "delidding tool":

der8auer Delid Die Mate 2
Dr. Delid
Rockit 88

Silicon Lottery - https://siliconlottery.com/collections/all/products/delid - is a reputable company that tests, bins and sells overclocked, delidded "K" CPU's. They also offer professional delidding services with quick turn-around time and a warranty.

However ... while there's nothing wrong with 65°C when "gaming", it introduces a huge set of variables. Regardless of how any particular gaming titles allocate CPU / GPU workloads, "gaming" is not well suited for testing thermal performance. If you'd like to learn how to properly test cooling performance, then read Section 11 - Thermal Test Basics in the Intel Temperature Guide - https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/intel-temperature-guide.1488337/

CT :sol:
 
Reactions: Venom_7

britechguy

Notable
Jul 2, 2019
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And now, so I can be excoriated, I'll also add that if you are not seeing actual "behavioral problems" the probability of having an actual temperature problem is virtually zero.

Things that are, in actuality, running hot, will exhibit very clear telltale signs caused by the throttling and instant shutdown characteristics built in to today's processors when their own internal thermal sensors (which are different than what often gets read by temperature software) detect adverse conditions. They will shut down to prevent catastrophic failure. If the internal sensors are malfunctioning then that's a different story, but you can't fix that, either.

There is a lot of "old hardware" out there (and even some newer stuff) that is chugging along just fine because it's not overheating, but were you to be checking temperature on a constant basis may be way off in its readings.

I've been in this business since the mid-1980s, and self-immolation of processors was rare, even then, when thermal monitoring and control were not nearly as sophisticated as they are today. I haven't seen an actual incident of same in the field in so long that I cannot remember.

I'm the contrarian who wishes, devoutly, that most users never even heard of temperature monitoring software and using same. What it generally causes is undue worry, and nothing else.
 
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Venom_7

Commendable
Mar 14, 2017
10
0
1,510
0
And now, so I can be excoriated, I'll also add that if you are not seeing actual "behavioral problems" the probability of having an actual temperature problem is virtually zero.

Things that are, in actuality, running hot, will exhibit very clear telltale signs caused by the throttling and instant shutdown characteristics built in to today's processors when their own internal thermal sensors (which are different than what often gets read by temperature software) detect adverse conditions. They will shut down to prevent catastrophic failure. If the internal sensors are malfunctioning then that's a different story, but you can't fix that, either.

There is a lot of "old hardware" out there (and even some newer stuff) that is chugging along just fine because it's not overheating, but were you to be checking temperature on a constant basis may be way off in its readings.

I've been in this business since the mid-1980s, and self-immolation of processors was rare, even then, when thermal monitoring and control were not nearly as sophisticated as they are today. I haven't seen an actual incident of same in the field in so long that I cannot remember.

I'm the contrarian who wishes, devoutly, that most users never even heard of temperature monitoring software and using same. What it generally causes is undue worry, and nothing else.
I'm not worried about temps and CPU longevity. But the problem that It was more quiet on evo hyper 212 (air cooling) and now an AIO doesn't add so much with some noises is a kind of lame.

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