Question Cat.6,will my ping increase if i use a 50m cable to wire up my PC?

Apr 1, 2020
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I know,50 metres kinda seems too much but because of how my house is designed i have to kinda go around it.

  1. I mainly use my PC for gaming and i was wondering if i will see any negative effects on my ping if i use a 50m cat6 Ethernet cable.
  2. I can't get my hands on 50m cat6 cables so i was also wondering if i could use 2,25m cables and connect them with an Inline RJ45 Coupler for Cat.6(will include pic below)
 
Yes, you are well within the max run distance for that cable. You should not note an appreciable difference in performance.
I would not recommend the coupler. You should be able to buy loose CAT5/6 cable at your local large hardware. There are tool-less termination kits you can get to either mount these to a plate or just put an RJ end on. Most of the DIY stuff going to come with the punch down schedule on the product card.
 
Reactions: AleksMiner
Apr 1, 2020
6
2
15
0
Yes, you are well within the max run distance for that cable. You should not note an appreciable difference in performance.
I would not recommend the coupler. You should be able to buy loose CAT5/6 cable at your local large hardware. There are tool-less termination kits you can get to either mount these to a plate or just put an RJ end on. Most of the DIY stuff going to come with the punch down schedule on the product card.
ye i had a look on those too but even though i can do some wiring i feel really uncomfortable working with this kind of a cable.I should avoid the coupler for reliability issues(cables disconnecting from pulling) or for other reasons
P.S. should also mention this is for indoors usage and not inside walls(cable will be visible,with exceptions when going behind furniture)
 
Reactions: punkncat
The distance limitation on ethernet is actually a resistance limit but that is too complex to understand or even test without expensive meters.

In effect a coupler is the same as adding a couple extra feet of cable. It you were trying to use say 2 50 meter cables it might not work since you are at the 100 meter limit. You are nowhere close to the 100 meters so you will have no issues.

One very important thing to point out is the limits on ethernet cables are for cables that meet the standards. Normally you would not even have to mention this but there is a massive amount of fake cable being sold. It may work at short distance but when you start to get longer distance it will not. Be very sure your wire is pure copper with wire size 22-24. Avoid any flat cable or CCA cables.
 
Apr 1, 2020
6
2
15
0
The distance limitation on ethernet is actually a resistance limit but that is too complex to understand or even test without expensive meters.

In effect a coupler is the same as adding a couple extra feet of cable. It you were trying to use say 2 50 meter cables it might not work since you are at the 100 meter limit. You are nowhere close to the 100 meters so you will have no issues.

One very important thing to point out is the limits on ethernet cables are for cables that meet the standards. Normally you would not even have to mention this but there is a massive amount of fake cable being sold. It may work at short distance but when you start to get longer distance it will not. Be very sure your wire is pure copper with wire size 22-24. Avoid any flat cable or CCA cables.
Will have an eye out for those,thanks!
 
If you aren't using additional plates/connectors the coupler should be fine, particularly in light of your discomfort in working with the ends. Make no 90* turns. If you have to, leave a loop. Try not to run within 18" of power/drop cords. If you have to cross power do so at 90*.

CAT5 would be more than fine for this.
 
Reactions: AleksMiner
I guess I skipped you first question. Short answer is it will not affect the ping./latency.

Longer answer for those that like to be overly precise signals in copper cable transfer approx 2/3 the speed of light. So if you REALLY want to calculate it adding 50 meters of cable does add time. It is so extremely small that you can never detect it with something like a ping command
 
Reactions: AleksMiner
Apr 1, 2020
6
2
15
0
If you aren't using additional plates/connectors the coupler should be fine, particularly in light of your discomfort in working with the ends. Make no 90* turns. If you have to, leave a loop. Try not to run within 18" of power/drop cords. If you have to cross power do so at 90*.

CAT5 would be more than fine for this.
I had the same concern about running close to power cables and i thought f/ftp cables would solve that
 
Reactions: punkncat
Don't even bother with shielded cables since you are not going to be able to install them correctly anyway. In theory you can get interference from power and other sources. In reality shielded cable is mostly used in situations where you are worried about the ethernet signal getting out and causing interference such as medical equipment.

Shielded cable to actually function correctly must be grounded on both ends. This ground for safety reasons can not be the ground in your power. You must run separate copper ground from a grounding rod to each end. You then must connect this to the shield in the wire. If you use shielded cable and do not ground it it acutely has a chance to act as a antenna increasing your interference.

Shielded cable is only used in very specialized installs and in large industrial installations.
 
Reactions: AleksMiner
Apr 1, 2020
6
2
15
0
Don't even bother with shielded cables since you are not going to be able to install them correctly anyway. In theory you can get interference from power and other sources. In reality shielded cable is mostly used in situations where you are worried about the ethernet signal getting out and causing interference such as medical equipment.

Shielded cable to actually function correctly must be grounded on both ends. This ground for safety reasons can not be the ground in your power. You must run separate copper ground from a grounding rod to each end. You then must connect this to the shield in the wire. If you use shielded cable and do not ground it it acutely has a chance to act as a antenna increasing your interference.

Shielded cable is only used in very specialized installs and in large industrial installations.
Very interesting,will have a look into that.
 

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