Celeron 370 heat output

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Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

I am working on upgrading a customer's computer, an old 433 mHz Celeron
(Socket 370). I already have an old Celeron 700 lying around, and
would like to use this processor as part of the upgrade. My question
is this: does the Celeron 700 output much more heat than the 433? The
stock heatsink on the 433 is fanless, and appears to be aluminum, which
worries me a bit, because all the Socket 370 Celeron systems I've ever
worked on have fans. I would appreciate any information you can give.
Thanks,
-Hukuis
 
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Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On 21 Feb 2005 07:55:43 -0800, 6roseds@gmail.com wrote:

>I am working on upgrading a customer's computer, an old 433 mHz Celeron
>(Socket 370). I already have an old Celeron 700 lying around, and
>would like to use this processor as part of the upgrade. My question
>is this: does the Celeron 700 output much more heat than the 433?

In a word, no. the 433MHz Celeron was built on a 250nm process and
has a maximum power consumption of 24.1W The 700MHz Celeron was built
on a newer 180nm process and has a maximum power consumption of only
18.3W

> The
>stock heatsink on the 433 is fanless, and appears to be aluminum, which
>worries me a bit, because all the Socket 370 Celeron systems I've ever
>worked on have fans. I would appreciate any information you can give.

A fanless heatsink could work just fine so long as the case fans
provide good airflow over the heatsink. Many (most?) of the
commercial grade business systems (ie Compaq Deskpro or Dell Optiplex
systems) used fanless heatsinks for these systems. A larger case fan
or something even just the power supply fan was used to provide
sufficient airflow that they worked ok.

If it worked for a 433MHz Celeron, it should work for a 700MHz
Celeron.

-------------
Tony Hill
hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca