Question Change fans on Noctua NH-D14 to something in black color ?

Those are both relatively low RPM fans and relatively low noise.

Are you more concerned with temperatures or noise?

Does your case have airflow problems?

Will you often be stressing your CPU a lot?

Haven't looked lately, but I think Noctua makes some black fans that spin above 2000 rpm...but you wouldn't necessarily need anything that fast....depending on your temps and how much you worry about temps.
 

Lukhino

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Those are both relatively low RPM fans and relatively low noise.

Are you more concerned with temperatures or noise?

Does your case have airflow problems?

Will you often be stressing your CPU a lot?

Haven't looked lately, but I think Noctua makes some black fans that spin above 2000 rpm...but you wouldn't necessarily need anything that fast....depending on your temps and how much you worry about temps.
I hate the brown color. I have all components in black color. I prefer quiet setup. I saw the noctua redux line, but im not sure if is good option. I saw some video where this redux line was hated.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
You won't find ANY fans that are as quiet or perform as well as the Noctua NF-F12 and NF-A14 fans. I use these exclusively in all my own systems. Whether you get them in the earth tones (Brown) or the Chromax black swap (Black) versions they perform the same. The "Redux" line is a budget line of fans and you do not want those unless you are not concerned with getting the same low noise level and high performance that you'd get from the normal line of Noctua products. To be clear, they do not perform as well nor are they as quiet at equal RPMs as the premium line of fans, which is why they are much less expensive.

The two fans I outlined for you are the very best option for your cooler.

It's even been proven.

https://www.overclockers.com/noctua-nh-d14-redux-modern-fans-on-an-old-heatsink/?cn-reloaded=1

If you are looking for higher performance you can go with the Noctua Industrial line of A14 and F12 fans, and you will certainly increase the cooling performance, but you will also mostly lose it's ability to remain very quiet.
 

Lukhino

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You won't find ANY fans that are as quiet or perform as well as the Noctua NF-F12 and NF-A14 fans. I use these exclusively in all my own systems. Whether you get them in the earth tones (Brown) or the Chromax black swap (Black) versions they perform the same. The "Redux" line is a budget line of fans and you do not want those unless you are not concerned with getting the same low noise level and high performance that you'd get from the normal line of Noctua products. To be clear, they do not perform as well nor are they as quiet at equal RPMs as the premium line of fans, which is why they are much less expensive.

The two fans I outlined for you are the very best option for your cooler.

It's even been proven.

https://www.overclockers.com/noctua-nh-d14-redux-modern-fans-on-an-old-heatsink/?cn-reloaded=1

If you are looking for higher performance you can go with the Noctua Industrial line of A14 and F12 fans, and you will certainly increase the cooling performance, but you will also mostly lose it's ability to remain very quiet.
Thank you so much for explain..

Can you please check this:

I have this setup
3xArctic P12 PMW Front intake
1x CPU Coller Noctua NH-D14
  • 1x NF-P14 PWM premium fan
  • 1x NF-P12 PWM premium fan
2xExhaust Fractal GP-12
http://ibb.co/hym1Nnq
http://imgway.cz/s/8T49

I use 3x Arctic P12PMW in front to max 1000RPM
-But i think i dont need these fan, these fans are good mount as radiator right?
-Do you prefer, 2x140mm or 3x120mm? And what brand do you use to push more air, without buzzing... I prefer quiet setup.
-Meshify C case has some dust filter in the front. I tried Arctic P14PMW fans but i sell it, I heard these fans more than 3x120mm in probably same setup.

Have i change stock fan to another brand? (2xFractal GP12 - exhaust)

Thank you for help.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
I mean, they aren't terrible. They have really decent specs, not terribly far off from the Noctua F12's, except for noise levels. I know Arctic is full of crap about their specs though. I've tested these Arctic P12's on the bench side by side with F12's and they do not push as much air as the Noctua fans and they are considerably louder. The fact that they try to say they are only .3 sone, which is about 10.5 db, is laughable. Even the Noctua's are louder than that and the Noctua's are much quieter at any equivalent RPM.

But yes, those could easily be used on a radiator with good results. Personally I wouldn't recommend going to an AIO over your D14 unless you have problems with the D14 for some reason. That cooler will outperform the majority of AIO coolers out there with the right fans on it. But if you have your own reasons for truly wanting to change, that's your choice. Any AIO you buy is already going to have it's own fans though, so you'd want to compare them before putting something else on there.
 

Lukhino

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I mean, they aren't terrible. They have really decent specs, not terribly far off from the Noctua F12's, except for noise levels. I know Arctic is full of crap about their specs though. I've tested these Arctic P12's on the bench side by side with F12's and they do not push as much air as the Noctua fans and they are considerably louder. The fact that they try to say they are only .3 sone, which is about 10.5 db, is laughable. Even the Noctua's are louder than that and the Noctua's are much quieter at any equivalent RPM.

But yes, those could easily be used on a radiator with good results. Personally I wouldn't recommend going to an AIO over your D14 unless you have problems with the D14 for some reason. That cooler will outperform the majority of AIO coolers out there with the right fans on it. But if you have your own reasons for truly wanting to change, that's your choice. Any AIO you buy is already going to have it's own fans though, so you'd want to compare them before putting something else on there.
I only wnat to get some quiter setup in black colors... :) I dont like AIO setup, because i think is a louder then NH-D14/NH-D15.
 
I only wnat to get some quiter setup in black colors... :) I dont like AIO setup, because i think is a louder then NH-D14/NH-D15.
The black Noctua Chromax series is probably about as quiet as you can get. They should spin at 500 rpm or less using your BIOS fan control curves. They also include a low noise adapter for even quieter levels, but you probably wouldn't need to use that.

You'll have to judge if temps would be OK at 500 rpm. If not, change the BIOS fan curves to a higher rpm. They will probably be audible as you go above 1000 rpm.
 

Lukhino

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Thank you all for answers.

What do you mean about this?

Case
Front 2x140

140mm Fans - NF-P14S Redux PWM - https://amzn.to/3PQE0pa

Exhaust 2x120
120mm Fans - NF-P12 Redux PWM - https://amzn.to/3vwkDt4

Cooler
1x 140 - NF-P14r redux PMW
1x 120 - NF-P12 redux PMW

https://ibb.co/zGz3cSy
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

OR only change fans on cooler NH-D14?
1xNF-F12 PMW chromax
Noctua F12 PWM chromax.black.swap 54.97 CFM 120 mm Fan

1xNF-A15 HS-PMW chromax
https://www.amazon.com/Noctua-NF-A15-HS-PWM-chromax-Black-swap-Premium-Grade/dp/B07654B9MR/ref=sr_1_5?crid=321FWLG0LW046&keywords=noctua+150+fan&qid=1660731534&sprefix=noctua+150fan,aps,164&sr=8-5

L.
 
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Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Put the Noctua Chromax black fans on your heatsink. Use your Arctic P12's for the intakes. Sell your Fractal design fans to somebody. Sell your brown Noctua fans to somebody and get two more Arctic P12's for the rear and Top-rear exhaust locations. Your case fans should never, or rarely, need to spin up to levels where they will show how noisy they can be anyhow and they do move a good amount of air, and have decent static pressure, so overall if you want all black fans and want good performance with low noise, this is the best way to go and will cost less in the long and short term.
 

Lukhino

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Put the Noctua Chromax black fans on your heatsink. Use your Arctic P12's for the intakes. Sell your Fractal design fans to somebody. Sell your brown Noctua fans to somebody and get two more Arctic P12's for the rear and Top-rear exhaust locations. Your case fans should never, or rarely, need to spin up to levels where they will show how noisy they can be anyhow and they do move a good amount of air, and have decent static pressure, so overall if you want all black fans and want good performance with low noise, this is the best way to go and will cost less in the long and short term.
Thank you for help.. last question.
Is a better to use like exhaust (Rear, Top-rear)2xArctic F12 PMW black?
https://www.arctic.de/en/F12-PWM/ACFAN00203A
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Those P12 Arctic fans are good for any intake, exhaust, heatsink or radiator location. Especially as case fans, since the case fans should be used with a curve that allows even a poor quality fan to remain quiet except at very high motherboard temperatures AND your case fans SHOULD be configured to use the "motherboard" temperature sensor in the BIOS. They should not be configured to use CPU or GPU, UNLESS you have serious problems with GPU overheating in which case they could be set to be controlled by GPU thermal sensor instead. So yes, they are fine for wherever you want to use them. Are they as good as the Noctua fans? No, of course not. It's ridiculous to think that, but for the price they are pretty good so long as you don't expect too much in terms of sound level.
 

Lukhino

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Those P12 Arctic fans are good for any intake, exhaust, heatsink or radiator location. Especially as case fans, since the case fans should be used with a curve that allows even a poor quality fan to remain quiet except at very high motherboard temperatures AND your case fans SHOULD be configured to use the "motherboard" temperature sensor in the BIOS. They should not be configured to use CPU or GPU, UNLESS you have serious problems with GPU overheating in which case they could be set to be controlled by GPU thermal sensor instead. So yes, they are fine for wherever you want to use them. Are they as good as the Noctua fans? No, of course not. It's ridiculous to think that, but for the price they are pretty good so long as you don't expect too much in terms of sound level.
Thank you for help...
And what fans do you use in your setup?
 

Lukhino

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Hi guys,
can someone help me with best position fans build? And what type to use, P series?F series? etc...

https://ibb.co/h2v0B2X

What is better for good quiet setup?

Is better to use all same fans?
For example 5x120 Arctic PMW? Or Noctua 5x120 (NF-F12,NF-A12x25)

Front panel with 3x120 or 2x140? (Meshify C has some dust filter in front, look at the picture)
(3x120 P12arctic or 3x120NF-F12 or 2x140 NF-A14 or 3xNF-A12x25)

Top-Rear with 120 or 140?
(P12 arctic, F12arctic,NF-F12,NF-A14,NF-A12x25)

What is better for GPU? When you want tu push some fresh air from front to rear case...2x120 or 2x140?
(3x120 P12arctic or 3x120NF-F12 or 2x140 NF-A14 or 3xNF-A12x25)

Is better when front fans have higher RPMs then Rear Exhaust,Top rear? Or all in the same RPMs?
- I don't want dust to settle in the case

Thank you so much
Lukas
 
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Sounds like you are way over-thinking all of this.

All other things equal, X fans will be "noisier" than X plus 1 fans of the same type and rpm. But quite possibly not audibly so.

Your ear is unlikely to tell you that "2 fans are twice as noisy as 1" ....it's not additive in the sense that weight or elapsed time might be. You might not notice any difference.

5 fans may not result in lower temperatures than 3 or 4.

In a blindfold test, you may not be able to detect noise differences between fan setup A and fan setup B.

A fan requirement for temps of X may be a lot different than one that requires temps of X minus 10. We don't know what your temperature requirements might be.

Noctua F series are ostensibly designed to use on heatsinks. I use one as an ordinary exhaust to good effect. Signifying not much.

A "quiet" fan like a Noctua A or S could easily be noisier at 1500 rpm than a "noisy" fan at 600 rpm.

Hearing is quite an individual thing.....you may be bothered by the noise signature of a particular "good" fan even though it is quiet. Frequency response declines noticeably as you age, so what bothered you at age 20 may not at 50.

There's no substitute for experimentation with YOUR ears in YOUR room at YOUR ambient temperatures with YOUR case using YOUR PC to do YOUR normal tasks. Can you do that?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
The truth is, aside from CPU cooler or radiator fans, just about any other fans you have should never really be audible if you set the curve properly. Most people do NOT set the fan curve properly OR they set the curve properly but designate the WRONG sensor as the control mechanism. If you set the "motherboard" sensor as the control mechanism AND you set a curve that only gradually, and very slightly, increases until it reaches about 60° C at which time the case fans go to about 50% speed and then ramp up to 100% speed at about 75°C, then it is very likely you will almost never hear the case fans at all (Unless you have REALLY crappy fans) except when you are either playing something extremely demanding for a long time or running a stress test.

As for what I run in my systems, as I said, I run ALL Noctua fans. It has been that way for MANY years. Personally I am running three systems that are ALL using no other fans than the NF-A14 which I think is the best consumer case fan on the market, period. The A15 is good too, but it has a weird harmonic that I don't appreciate.
 
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Karadjgne

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Most cases run 30° to 50°, depending on ambient temps, loads, airflow. Unfortunately, default for sys_fan headers is @ 40% at 30° to 100% at 70°, so fan curves start out messed up to begin with.

There's no realistic performance difference between 90% and 100%, but you'll find that last 10% fan will double the noise output.

JayZ says one thing about fans, but I disagree. He says fan types don't really matter. I believe they do.
With Noctua, F series is a force directed fan. It's blades and shroud are designed to channel air exhaust in a 90° flow. This is optimal for a rad/heatsink as all the static pressure is directed straight through the restriction. Also works well in restricted or obstructed cases for moving the air past all that.

The S series is the opposite. High rpm, high cfm fans with low static pressure. Perfect for exhausts since they move a ton of air, but once out of the case that air is irrelevant, so little static pressure is really required.

The P series is the hybrid. Less static pressure than F, less cfm than S, but higher static pressure/cfm in opposition. Some call that balanced. So it works well with some heatsinks, has a relatively shallow cone, and moves a lot of air, making it better overall for intakes.

The A series is a better version of the older P series, has higher cfm, higher static pressure, so a broader range of affect, almost as good as the F/P series in their specialty.

That theory works for All fan types. Put an S at intake, you'll move plenty of air in, but it doesn't go anywhere, just sorta drifts towards the exit, which tends to starve the gpu. Put an F at intake, the gpu gets flooded with air, but the cpu sees very little fresh air as a result, the majority of its source being warmer air exhaust from the gpu. So a hybrid with a decent cone size and enough static pressure to feed a gpu, will supply both, simultaneously, with fresh outside air.

A case has 3 zones. High pressure in the path of any intakes, zero pressure centrally, low pressure in front of any exhaust fans. The objective is to negate as much of the zero pressure as possible. Nature abhors a vacuum, so any air in the case will gravitate towards the low pressure area naturally. With a large central area, that's slow moving air, the low pressure area providing all the attraction. With a small central area, airflow is faster as low pressure suction is in addition to high pressure push.

So static/hybrids in front, cfm/hybrids in rear is optimal types. Also to consider is placement. Most times you'll want airflow in a single direction, front to back. Putting additional fans on bottom can be counter productive as that forces air away from the gpu. Putting intake on top/front with high rpm forces front intake downwards etc. But top/front intake and low rpm will add to front/top and help out cooler fans.

Which is where setting up fan curves comes into play. As Darkbreeze said, most ppl do Not set the right curves, with the right sensors. A top mounted front intake at 300rpm will help a cpu aircooler, that same fan at 1300rpm will destroy cpu temps. As will having that fan as exhaust, it'll just suck all the air from any high mounted front intake, away from the cpu fan.

Too many fans creates conflicts, not enough fans doesn't resolve issues. The trick is to use the right amount of fans, to do the job right and to have those fans setup correctly so they Can do the job right.

I adjust fans using Prime95 small fft, @ 70% workers, so on my 16thread cpu, I use just 12 workers. Simultaneously run MSI Kombuster fuzzy donut. That gives me @ most demanding game setup.
Then I give the case a solid hour to acclimate the power loads and temps. I use CoreTemp cpu/gpu and fan software to lower/raise intake/exhausts 100-200rpm stages and see how that affects noise output vs temps giving 5 mins or so between speed adjustments. I'm looking for max with compromise. Then do the same at idle, looking for minimum. Then I play my favorite game, see where that linear line puts me and then adjust the center of the curve up/down as I feel I need or can.

The end result is no matter what I play, it'll be under maximum, so under maximum noise tolerance, under max allowable temps (I don't care exactly what that number is as long as it's decent/safe, a cpu at 50° is exactly the same as at 70°) and at idle the pc is silent and not overly warm (idle of 32° isn't any different to 38°).

If I spend anything less than @ 4hrs messing with fan curves, I've either gotten real lucky with guessing the settings or gotten real lazy and not done a thorough job.
 
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Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Jayz2shits is an idiot. He doesn't know a damn thing really. Don't get me wrong, I like the guy. Well, better than Linus anyhow, which ain't sayin' much. But seriously, the fan model absolutely matters. With a crappy fan you absolutely have to definitively manage the speed or else it will drive you nucking futs. With a really good fan, even if you create a poorly devised curve or use a not so great preset, even at higher RPMs it won't be terribly loud.

But obviously the best option is to manage your case fan curve conscientiously AND use good quality fans. I mean, it's not rocket science. It's aerodynamics. LOL.

Ok, I guess rocket science DOES have some overlap with aerodynamics. I concede.
 

Karadjgne

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Lol. And both are integral with thermodynamics, which is the entire basis for cooling and airflow.

And yes, I have 4 fans in my pc, all attached to rads. 2x A12x25 and 2x A12x15 Noctua. I actually 'did the dance thing' when I found Noctua had released a slim A12 fan, otherwise I'd have been looking at some Prolimatechs (which aren't that bad, they just aren't Noctua).
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Another model that is really very good for the money is the Aerocool Dead Silence 120/140mm fans. Not only do they have a very distinct color scheme, available in red and black, blue and black, black and grey and white and black, but they are actually really quiet for the price and seemingly very durable as I've been running five of them almost non-stop for about seven years in a closet system that serves media to the house. I had them in my main system for a little while, while I was waiting for my Chromax fans to show up back in the day, and they were really damn good. The only complaint I really have with them and it isn't as relevant as it was a few years ago, is that they are only available in 3 pin DC controlled. No PWM four pin option at all. But these days, unlike back when I first got them, being able to easily switch from DC to PWM or visa versa in the BIOS makes that a problem of the past. If you can get them for under 15 bucks each, and I think I paid like ten bucks each eight years ago, then it's a pretty decent deal. And, they look really good as well although they do not have an RGB option, they do have lighting anyhow.



But for the price, and I mean strictly for the price, those Arctic fans are very hard to beat with seemingly better specs than the Corsair Maglev fans aside from the bearing.
 

Karadjgne

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Don't let specs fool you. And they'll try. The two single best rad fans for years were the Noctua F12 and Scythe Gentle Typhoon. They were mediocre fans. Many fans had way more CFM, more SP, higher rpm, some were even quieter. Yet none could touch those fans on a rad.

Also, there's no Static Pressure standard. CFM yes, but not SP. That's a measure of how much water a fan will move over a distance. What water, diluted or tap, over which surface teflon or desktop or wood or metal. At which distance above sea-level.

So every manufacturer has its own methodology for testing and results, which differ from others. A high SP fan from one company might be low to another company or vice versa.

The only true measure of a fan is what it can actually accomplish, not what it says on paper. Arctic fans are very good, especially for the price. Noctua are proven great fans, even the newer Fractal, Nzxt, Corsair or beQuiet fans are very good. For what they do. Even a couple of the cheap knock-offs are decent.

If any fan doesn't accomplish what you need it to do, it's worthless and should be changed. Might be an otherwise fantastic fan, but that's moot if it fails to do the job. F12's are great rad fans, lousy exhaust fans, for instance. Finding the right fan for the application is more important than any particular brand. If you get the right fan, and it happens to be a better quality fan, from a more reliable and quality brand, bonus.
 

Lukhino

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The truth is, aside from CPU cooler or radiator fans, just about any other fans you have should never really be audible if you set the curve properly. Most people do NOT set the fan curve properly OR they set the curve properly but designate the WRONG sensor as the control mechanism. If you set the "motherboard" sensor as the control mechanism AND you set a curve that only gradually, and very slightly, increases until it reaches about 60° C at which time the case fans go to about 50% speed and then ramp up to 100% speed at about 75°C, then it is very likely you will almost never hear the case fans at all (Unless you have REALLY crappy fans) except when you are either playing something extremely demanding for a long time or running a stress test.

As for what I run in my systems, as I said, I run ALL Noctua fans. It has been that way for MANY years. Personally I am running three systems that are ALL using no other fans than the NF-A14 which I think is the best consumer case fan on the market, period. The A15 is good too, but it has a weird harmonic that I don't appreciate.
Thank you so much for explain..
 

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