Question Charging slow-charging North American devices in Europe?

WareHardTom

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Dec 28, 2011
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Every voltage adapter I've looked at warns against its use for electronics, for extended durations, or unsupervised. This is just the opposite of the charging requirement for my electric toothbrush. Googling indicates that voltage adaption is fraught with risks.

Is that really the situation, or is there a safe, reliable solution?
 

jonnyguru

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Every voltage adapter I've looked at warns against its use for electronics, for extended durations, or unsupervised. This is just the opposite of the charging requirement for my electric toothbrush. Googling indicates that voltage adaption is fraught with risks.

Is that really the situation, or is there a safe, reliable solution?
Depends on the device.

Most products these days accept full range input and don't need a voltage adapter.

For example: Any PC PSU bought in the US will work in US and EU without a voltage adapter. 99% of laptop bricks work in US and EU without a voltage adapter.

What electronics are you taking with you from the US to EU?

Also, the product should actually say on the back, or on the adapter, etc. what the input voltage range is.
 

WareHardTom

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Dec 28, 2011
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It's the charging base for an electric toothbrush from about 12 years ago. It specifies North American voltage only. The voltage adapter I bought specifically says not for battery chargers. If the technology is so fraught, I figured I'd also avoid using a different adapter that also has lots of warnings, but no specific mention of avoiding its use for chargers. That leaves me with no options, so I wonder what other people do.
 

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