News Chinese SSD Manufacturer Races Forward to PCIe 5.0

TJ Hooker

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The bandwidths listed are all a factor of two higher than they should be. Unless you're alluding to the fact that PCIe is full duplex, but it's still weird to be listing the bandwidth as double the per-direction bandwidth (e.g. no one describes gigabit ethernet as having 2 Gbps bandwidth).
 
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hannibal

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The Main point is that pci 5 is coming maybe Sooner than it was expected. 2022 to intel? Amd ... hard to say. Intel was planning Pci4 2021, but who knows if They jump to 5.0 just to get bigger Number than amd. And we don`t know what am5 prings. Rumored ddr5, pci ??? Usb 4 2•2? All in all. The cpu, gpu and IO deparment is interesting in coming years!
 
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I think I'll wait until there is a tested, reviewed component from a country that has not already been proven to embed spyware and back doors into it's hardware and doesn't oppress it's own people. For both security and moral reasons, perhaps we should be supporting manufacturers based in more democratic countries.
 
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thisisaname

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Intel may as well skip 4 and go straight to 5, considering 4 has been out since 2017 it is a bit late to introduce it next year but it is to late to do that now considering the lead time in processor design.

AMD is looking like 2021 with Zen 4 but it could be 2020 but I think that is unlikely. They said the would support the same socket until 2020 and the Zen 3 and the last to support the current socket.
 
if Intel would skip PCIE4.0 and go for 5.0 it could offset AMD gains from sh**load of PCIE lines by having super fast ones. As current PCIE x4 could be replaced by x1, you have 4 times the fun within same PCIE lines count....
And that would be insanely fun move from blue side.
 

setx

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Intel may as well skip 4 and go straight to 5
Idk why people keep saying this. I think there were leaks about Intel's next server platform that clearly indicated PCI-E 4.

if Intel would skip PCIE4.0 and go for 5.0 it could offset AMD gains from sh**load of PCIE lines by having super fast ones
Good luck finding those PCI-E 5 1x devices. What people like to forget is that new standards don't come cheap, in terms of both price and power consumption. Only top devices will move to 5 while most controllers will remain on 3 for a long time.
 
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Good luck finding those PCI-E 5 1x devices. What people like to forget is that new standards don't come cheap, in terms of both price and power consumption. Only top devices will move to 5 while most controllers will remain on 3 for a long time.
I know, 90% of devices will not benefit from it for next 3-4 years :) but it would be fun, and intel needs anything that says "we can play this game" right now.
 
I know, 90% of devices will not benefit from it for next 3-4 years : ) but it would be fun, and intel needs anything that says "we can play this game" right now.
If by "fun" you mean paying substantially more for motherboards with hotter-running chipsets that offer no tangible performance benefits for the life of the system, then sure. : P

On the graphics card side of things, only recently have high-end cards started bumping into the performance limitations of PCIe 2.0. It will likely be a number of years before high-end cards are limited in any significant way by PCIe 3.0, let alone 4.0.

And with storage hardware, you start to run into diminishing returns as SSD performance increases, which is why for most tasks, one will be hard-pressed to notice much difference between a SATA SSD and a high-end NVMe model offering multiple times the theoretical performance. Such a drive might offer six or more times the sequential transfer rate of a 500MB/s SATA SSD, but for something like loading a game or application, you are not likely to see much more than a 10% difference between the two. PCIe 4.0 drives offer similar load times to the 3.0 models, and doubling that bandwidth again with 5.0 isn't going to be any different.

At this point, it's a bit of a stretch to see the near-term benefits of PCIe 4.0 in a desktop system, let alone 5.0. Intel are rumored to be launching 5.0 for their server hardware in 2021, but it probably won't on their desktop platforms until at least a year later, and I would not be surprised if it took longer than that, since there really isn't a pressing need for more PCIe bandwidth in desktop systems right now.
 
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If by "fun" you mean paying substantially more for motherboards with hotter-running chipsets that offer no tangible performance benefits for the life of the system, then sure. : P
I enjoy PCMR. While everyone will not gain from new system, leaving it as optional .95 board, while smaller ones can still do 3.0 and slowly bring it down gen by gen, to 90, 70, 50, 30, 10 lineups....
if trends will keep going as they do now,
 

thisisaname

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Intel may as well skip 4 and go straight to 5, considering 4 has been out since 2017 it is a bit late to introduce it next year but it is to late to do that now considering the lead time in processor design.
Idk why people keep saying this. I think there were leaks about Intel's next server platform that clearly indicated PCI-E 4.


Good luck finding those PCI-E 5 1x devices. What people like to forget is that new standards don't come cheap, in terms of both price and power consumption. Only top devices will move to 5 while most controllers will remain on 3 for a long time.
If you are going to quote me please quote the whole sentence :)
As for PCI-5 devices well you are not going to find any if there is nothing to plug them into.
new standards tend to be expensive when they first come out due to early adopter being willing to pay extra for new shiny stuffs no matter how useful the shiny is.
 

bit_user

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Idk why people keep saying this. I think there were leaks about Intel's next server platform that clearly indicated PCI-E 4.
Yes. However, if you look further down their roadmap, they have also announced PCIe 5.0, which they need for CXL - their new datacenter GPU compute interconnect.


https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-server-ddr5-pcie-5.0-roadmap-leaked-granite-rapids,39403.html

The thing most people miss is that PCIe 5 will probably be a lot like 10 Gig Ethernet, which has been used in data centers since almost 15 years ago, but is still virtually nonexistent in mainstream desktop PCs. PCIe 5 is a more expensive, more power-hungry technology, with more limitations and constraints. It will be a long time in coming to desktop PCs, if ever.
 

mcgge1360

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(e.g. no one describes gigabit ethernet as having 2 Gbps bandwidth).
Once I bought a switch amazon claiming to be a "Gigabit" network switch. It was a 5 port (4 out 1 in) that was 100 Mbps, so they're like hey 5 ports 100 Mbps both ways that's gigabit right? Needless to say I returned that and left a warning for others. It is not common, but it's not unheard of for companies to "stretch" their numbers. You see it on routers all the time as well. 900 Mbps 5GHz + 300 Mbps 2.4GHz will be labeled as "1200Mbps" which is ridiculous because you can't be connected to both at the same time unless you have very specific hardware and software to support such thing.
 

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