News Chip-Maker SMIC Tries to Work Around Import Restrictions

Endymio

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The company needed to invest in process technologies R&D as well as in massive fabs ...
According to the FBI, in the US alone there are over 2,500 active industrial espionage cases open against China and Chinese entities. A significant number of these deal with semiconductor fabrication technology. The "investment" here is primarily theft of IP from Western companies.
 
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According to the FBI, in the US alone there are over 2,500 active industrial espionage cases open against China and Chinese entities. A significant number of these deal with semiconductor fabrication technology. The "investment" here is primarily theft of IP from Western companies.
According to court records, China has never stolen significant American IP and few cases against China have resulted in serious penalties.
The FBI is blowing smoke.
Prosecuting Chinese "Spies": an Empirical Analysis of the Economic Espionage Act. By Andrew Chongseh Kim. Cardozo Law Review. Vol 40:749http://cardozolawreview.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Kim.40.2.6.newcharts.pdf

Conclusion: This Study finds that Chinese and other Asian-Americans are disproportionately charged under the Economic Espionage Act, receive much longer sentences, and are significantly more likely to be innocent than defendants of other races. From 1997 to 2009, 17 percent of defendants charged under the act were of Chinese descent, but after 2009, that rate tripled to 52 percent. Furthermore, the average sentence for defendants with Chinese names convicted of espionage was 25 months, compared with 11 months for those with Western names. Similarly, 48 percent of defendants with Western names escaped imprisonment and received only probation—more than double the 21 percent rate of those with Chinese names.

Although it is possible that Asian-Americans are prosecuted more often because they commit espionage more often, it is also possible that they are prosecuted more often because the DOJ has focused more resources to detect and punish spying related to Asian countries and defendants and so spends fewer resources investigating espionage conducted by defendants of other races.

This Study also suggests that the DOJ is more likely to file charges prematurely, based on weak evidence, when the case involves an Asian- American defendant.

Although some of these disparities may reflect legitimate concerns over the risk of flight, they may also reflect implicit biases with regard to the loyalty of Asian-Americans to the United States.

In addition, this Article reveals that the traditional justifications for pretextual prosecutions generally do not apply to convictions of Asian-Americans originally suspected of espionage for false statements. Rather, these convictions harm the accountability of the DOJ, may serve to punish otherwise innocent minorities simply for being wrongfully profiled, and, ultimately, may force loyal Americans to refuse to cooperate with investigators for fear of being punished for false statements.

By addressing racial biases and creating more transparent processes for charging and resolving espionage cases, however, we can reduce the number of innocent Americans charged with espionage and minimize the harm caused by these unfortunate cases.
 
Have you looked at Chinese military aircraft? And you tell me they haven’t stolen anything or significant amounts of anything? Your post is pure bollocks. Studies you referred to are absolute BS as well
 

Endymio

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According to court records, China has never stolen significant American IP
So all those guilty pleas and guilty verdicts are faked?

According to a WSJ article in 2019, direct losses from Chinese theft of IP from US firms are a minimum of several hundred billion dollars; indirect losses cannot be easily calculated, but are certainly much higher.

Prosecuting Chinese "Spies": an Empirical Analysis of the Economic Espionage Act. By Andrew Chongseh Kim.
This isn't a study; it's an opinion article written by an Asian-American lawyer. It's conclusions are rather laughable -- if the spike in espionage cases against Chinese citizens over the last couple of decades were due simply to "prejudice against Asians", you'd see large increases in prosecution of Japanese, Vietnamese, and other Asians. Instead, the increase comes primarily from a single source: agents working under the direction of the PRC.

As for the so-called "stiffer penalties" meted out, most industrial espionage cases are minor: a single individual trying to make a little extra cash. Cases involving conspiracies plotted by foreign governments are significantly more serious, and certainly merit more severe penalties.
 

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