Question Circuit break when using pc

Znn

Aug 30, 2022
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So I got a new cyberpowerpc PC with Intel Core i7-12700KF/1TB SSD/16GB RAM/RTX 3070/Windows 11.

The issue is that my PC made my circuit break twice, and I'm concerned about my psu. my PC was running a vr game for like an hour, but after a bit I started a different vr game and that's when the circuit break happened. It happened for the room I was in and the room besides my room. Does anyone know how I can prevent thos or make it so my computer uses less voltage from power outlet?
 

Gam3r01

Titan
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Generally speaking a properly functioning PC shouldnt cause a breaker to trip like that.
Are you using the PC on the same outlet as some other high draw device? Power strip/extension cord, etc?
If possible, maybe have cyberpower replace the PSU (make and model, if possible?). There is a chance its a faulty unit causing issues if the PC isnt sharing the outlet.
If not, you may want to consult with an electrician.
 

Znn

Aug 30, 2022
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hi, my pc is using one outlet with nothing else on it. I have another outlet that is connected to my monitor and connected to my vrheadset. I also checked and ofund my power unit uses 750 watts. is this too much?
 

Gam3r01

Titan
Moderator
AFAIK you should have plenty of headroom then, so I dont think overdraw from the PSU is the issue.
Lowering settings/power consumption may prevent the symptoms (breaker) but it wont solve the problem (why its tripping under standard use).
 

Znn

Aug 30, 2022
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yes i just tested it. I have medium graphics and so far nothing tripped. Its one specific game atm that shows its using very high power usage in task manager as well as about 6000 mb memory. I dont know if thats too much usage for memory tho
 
Last edited:

wyliec2

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Apr 4, 2014
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Is the breaker that's tripping a GFCI or AFCI (ground or arc fault) breaker? It's unusual for breakers to trip in normal circumstances due to current overload unless you have high-wattage heaters or hair dryers running or an actual short circuit.

I had a PC with a particular PSU that worked fine but would occasionally trip a GFCI circuit. I eventually built a new PC (new CPU, MB, PSU, etc) and the problem never recurred. It's not uncommon for a larger UPS to trip a GFCI circuit but you didn't mention having a UPS.
 

carocuore

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Jan 24, 2021
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Size (nominal continuous ampacity, properly) of the breaker? Should say something like 3 amp, 6 amp, and so on. If it's too small there's a reason for that and it's that the installed wiring doesn't supports more than that current (is too thin), the purpose of a breaker is to protect the wiring and prevent sockets from overheating or melting.
To clarify: a breaker won't instantly pop when its rating is reached but will take a certain amount of time that's set by a curve. Another reason is that the breaker is too old and the solenoid (coil) is worn out and trips when it shouldn't, now you must not understand a thing but it's what a qualified electrician should look for when diagnosing this issue.

Remember a power supply that can output 750W DC will not draw 750W AC from the mains circuit, depending on efficiency it'll draw around 20% more. Thing is, that computer isn't using all 750W so it's a bit odd.

Does anyone know how I can prevent thos
Well, you don't. Unqualified DIY dads often install bigger breakers to prevent tripping but also set their houses on fire by overloading the wiring. It's the modern equivalent of replacing a fuse with a bolt or a tinfoil ball. Dangerous.
 

Karadjgne

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Does anyone know how I can prevent thos or make it so my computer uses less voltage from power outlet?
That's easy enough. Get rid of the 200w+ 12700k and 300w+ 3070 and use far less power hungry components like a 65w Ryzen and 1050ti.

If you don't want to get rid of them, you are stuck dealing with whatever power they require to do the job.

Add up usage. Figure pc = 5a total. That leaves 10 amps for both rooms. Amps = watts/120v. If all you've got = 10a spare, and both rooms have 2 light bulbs running, that's 2x60 = 1A. That leaves 8amps, and Mom plugs in 10A vacuum cleaner, buh bye pc.

It's take a qualified electrician to seperate the rooms, possibly without drywall damage, and run a new home run to the panel. At worst, if that's not realistically possible, may just run a dedicated circuit to your room for the pc.
 

Znn

Aug 30, 2022
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thanks, everyone! I've managed to prevent the issue by connecting my monitor plug to an outlet outside my room with an extender cable. The house I'm in was newly built but I'm guessing they installed a cheap circuit breaker or one that isn't too good. The house itself has some flaws because the realtor who was in charge of it didn't really care. So far everything is working fine, with the PC plugged into my room's outlet.
 

Karadjgne

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Your typical lcd monitor only uses @ 35w. That's about half of a standard 60w light bulb, or @ 1/4A. If moving that has fixed the issue, I'd be wondering exactly why a 1/4A appliance was enough to mess up the circuit to begin with.
 

Zerk2012

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hi, my pc is using one outlet with nothing else on it. I have another outlet that is connected to my monitor and connected to my vrheadset. I also checked and ofund my power unit uses 750 watts. is this too much?
It would be everything that is connected to all outlets that the circuit breaker stopped from working..
 
Reactions: Znn
Hi Znn. I'm pleased that you've found a work-around to your issue. Two things: (1) A core i7-12700 + RTX 3070 shouldn't trip your breaker, unless most of your home is on a single circuit; unlikely. I'm not an electrician, but according to my google search "All new houses in Canada have 100-ampere 220-volt main electrical panel, with functioning and well protecting circuit breakers, some old houses have 60 Ampere..."

It seems moderately suspicious that your breaker should trip unless there are many more appliances on the circuit.

(2) It's my personal experience that Cyberpower PCs come with notoriously low quality brand PSUs. I help a large number of friends upgrade their prebuilts, and I've come across Cyberpower PCs from many years ago to current, and every one of them has an absolute trash power supply. I would recommend swapping in a high quality unit.
 
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Karadjgne

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Hi Znn. I'm pleased that you've found a work-around to your issue. Two things: (1) A core i7-12700 + RTX 3070 shouldn't trip your breaker, unless most of your home is on a single circuit; unlikely. I'm not an electrician, but according to my google search "All new houses in Canada have 100-ampere 220-volt main electrical panel, with functioning and well protecting circuit breakers, some old houses have 60 Ampere..."

It seems moderately suspicious that your breaker should trip unless there are many more appliances on the circuit.

(2) It's my personal experience that Cyberpower PCs come with notoriously low quality brand PSUs. I help a large number of friends upgrade their prebuilts, and I've come across Cyberpower PCs from many years ago to current, and every one of them has an absolute trash power supply. I would recommend swapping in a high quality unit.
Mains breaker has nothing to do with the matter. Op's bedroom will be on a 15A breaker and since it's 220v, there is allowance for upto 12 outlets in Canada, so for small bedrooms that only have 4-5 outlets, it's common practice to double up on the rooms so that additional homeruns and additional breakers don't need to be used, it saves on 100ft± of wire and breaker costs per run.

The fact that Op moved the monitor to a different circuit, outside of the bedrooms circuit says 1 of 3 things. Either the circuit IS severely overloaded somehow, the circuit WAS overloaded (mom vacuuming the other bedroom while Op was gaming) or there is an issue with the monitor cable that's temporarily bypassed. It's not uncommon for those uber cheap freebie monitor/psu cables to have a break internally which when the cable is in one position causes a short, but bent in another removes the short.

Op should slowly move that monitor cable around, stressing it next to the plug. Should also check to see exactly what is plugged in and where in both bedrooms and do a rough total.

It's also possible the outlet in question is a little loose in the box, and the ground wire too close to the side terminals, and it arc'd, which would cause the breaker to trip. It takes a much harder hit to trip a mains breaker, usually a dead short between both phases and not a single phase to ground trip.
 
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