[SOLVED] Cleaning GPU contact pins with rubber/erasor- myth?

Nov 29, 2019
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So, going from my previous post here looks like may GPU is dead, most likely a Vram failure. Only had it for 1 day so not exactly expecting issues already.

I was hoping to start the process of getting it RMA'd or replaced this weekend, but Amazon support have been... interesting. Probably doing what they can to avoid refunding /replacing.

They've been putting me through troubleshooting steps to check the card, pretty much all of which I've already done (reseating card, trying a different card to check it's not the system, etc. ) and one of the steps they are specifically asking me to do is "rub an eraser on the gold contact pins of the GPU to clean them, and then use a napkin to remove any debris".

Now, having not heard this one before I was already skeptical, so I've had a look online and seem to be getting mixed results as to whether or not this is a good idea especially considering upon visual inspection the pins seem perfectly clean so there's nothing I can see to actually remove with the rubber - i feel like I'm more likely to be either damaging the gold contact or leaving debris behind. When questioning this I was then instead provided the contact number for Gigabyte directly, who surprise surprise aren't in this weekend. I'm already expecting that conversation to last about 20 seconds in which they point me back to Amazon. Still a bit concerned that they were advising me to take a rubber to the contact pins though.

Is this really a good thing to be being advised to do in this case?

As an add on, does anyone have experience with getting faulty products like this returned via amazon? How can I get this resolved quickly?
 
There's a reason Amazon hides their support numbers and you usually have to email jeff@amazon.com to get good service. Customer service is expensive, so they want you to try all of the automated ways first. They have provided one--just select it's "defective."

To answer your question, the rubber in erasers is just a handy way to hold abrasive grit--early erasers were made of bread dipped into sandstone dust. Ink erasers are the most abrasive while gum erasers generally the least--the properties of vinyl allows vinyl erasers to uniquely be nonabrasive and still work as erasers, but it can generate such large static charges that rubbing it on sensitive electronics may destroy them.

Given that connectors on both sides are very thinly gold plated and thus highly corrosion resistant, abrasives should only be resorted to for removing plastic coatings such as hairspray or polymerized oil (which actually can be a problem for PCs in salons or fast-food restaurants with deep fryers). Otherwise this suggestion is a relic of bygone days when connectors were plated with tin. It's much better to wipe with a contact cleaner such as Deoxit.
 
Nov 29, 2019
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It's not that they are refusing (not directly anyway) they just seem to be tiptoeing around that solution - after this convo with Gigabyte I'm going to just insist on it as I'm well within the 30 day guarantee anyway.

I'm not at home atm and it's a fairly old build so won't be able to list all exact models from memory:

i7 4790k CPU
Maximus Vii Ranger Mobo
8GB Ram (Corsair?)
Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1660 Ti WINDFORCE OC 6G
Corsair rm750 PSU

EDIT: Previous post including full symptoms/images of issue
 
Nov 29, 2019
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And how did you come tyo the conclusion the GPU is dead from VRAM failure?
Comparing my visual results to other results found online (not at all accurate, but not a lot to go on), the fact that the issue occurred mid usage (actually occurred when I tabbed back in to RDR2) during high load. The fact that the issue seems to occur immediately on boot up before windows loads indicates that it is at the very least hardware related rather than drivers. Also going from general advice given on my last post.

Absolutely happy to be proven wrong on this btw.
 
Comparing my visual results to other results found online (not at all accurate, but not a lot to go on), the fact that the issue occurred mid usage (actually occurred when I tabbed back in to RDR2) during high load. The fact that the issue seems to occur immediately on boot up before windows loads indicates that it is at the very least hardware related rather than drivers. Also going from general advice given on my last post.

Absolutely happy to be proven wrong on this btw.
Are you getting artifacts on screen?
 
Nov 29, 2019
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Are you getting artifacts on screen?
Yep


This was Sold and Shipped by Amazon?
And well within the initial 30 days?

How did you start this return action? I've never had any issue returning something in that time period.
Yeah sold/shipped by Amazon: Sold by: Amazon EU S.a.r.L. I received the card on Thursday, with the initial purchase being on Wednesday (27/11).

I should add that rather than going directly down that route first I instead contacted support directly - my first time having to return faulty hardware so wasn't entirely sure what my best/quickest option would be and was hoping to get advice there - starting to regret that decision as I get the feeling I should have just returned it.
 
There's a reason Amazon hides their support numbers and you usually have to email jeff@amazon.com to get good service. Customer service is expensive, so they want you to try all of the automated ways first. They have provided one--just select it's "defective."

To answer your question, the rubber in erasers is just a handy way to hold abrasive grit--early erasers were made of bread dipped into sandstone dust. Ink erasers are the most abrasive while gum erasers generally the least--the properties of vinyl allows vinyl erasers to uniquely be nonabrasive and still work as erasers, but it can generate such large static charges that rubbing it on sensitive electronics may destroy them.

Given that connectors on both sides are very thinly gold plated and thus highly corrosion resistant, abrasives should only be resorted to for removing plastic coatings such as hairspray or polymerized oil (which actually can be a problem for PCs in salons or fast-food restaurants with deep fryers). Otherwise this suggestion is a relic of bygone days when connectors were plated with tin. It's much better to wipe with a contact cleaner such as Deoxit.
 

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I should add that rather than going directly down that route first I instead contacted support directly - my first time having to return faulty hardware so wasn't entirely sure what my best/quickest option would be and was hoping to get advice there - starting to regret that decision as I get the feeling I should have just returned it.
That "support" is for issues related to Amazon.
Not to "fix" any of the hundreds of thousand electronic items they sell.

Just return it, if you think it is actually defective.

After the initial 30 days, that is when you go through the manufacturer and their individualized support for that particular item.
 

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