Question Clicking noise from new psu,the pc won't boot

devinwojenka23

Prominent
Apr 22, 2019
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Recently i got a new 400watt Everese psu for my low end office pc after my old 230 watt psu suddenly died,it was an old psu so i had it coming.


After i got the new one,i plugged it to my mobo and cpu (my gpu draws power from mobo itself so i did not plugged it) my mobos led lighte up,but when i click the power button,the psu started making a weird clicking noise,not so loud but not low enough to just shrug it off,and when i looked at my pc it did not boot up . any advice?


Specs:

asus m5a78l-m lx3 mobo
Evga GT730 2GB DDR3
8Gb kingston HYPERX ram
AMD FX-8320 CPU
 
Recently i got a new 400watt Everese psu for my low end office pc after my old 230 watt psu suddenly died,it was an old psu so i had it coming.


After i got the new one,i plugged it to my mobo and cpu (my gpu draws power from mobo itself so i did not plugged it) my mobos led lighte up,but when i click the power button,the psu started making a weird clicking noise,not so loud but not low enough to just shrug it off,and when i looked at my pc it did not boot up . any advice?


Specs:

asus m5a78l-m lx3 mobo
Evga GT730 2GB DDR3
8Gb kingston HYPERX ram
AMD FX-8320 CPU
I'm assuming you meant the brand name is Everest. Can you provide the model number?
 
oops sorry for the typo,model is eps1600-a
I'm not positive your power supply is the actual problem but let me tell you about this model. Computers use mainly the +12 volt power rail. A good quality power supply can deliver close to its full rated output on +12 volt.

The Everest model you listed only provides 20 amps on +12 volt. Volts x Amps = Watts, so 12volts x 20amps = 240 watts. Thats all your PSU can actually deliver where your system needs it the most. Everest labels it as a 350 watt unit, but as you can see it's far from that. I would not expect the internal components to be of high quality either. This was likely a very low cost unit but I don't know what you paid for it.

There's no 80+ certification listed for it and I could not find any protective circuitry listed for it either although I imagine it must have something to keep it from going up in smoke. What you have is a low quality power supply, with a misleading label, that probably should not be used in any computer. If possible, I'd return it for something better that can actually deliver the power it claims to be capable of, made by a reputable, well known company. Hopefully there is nothing else wrong with your system and a better power supply is all you need.
 
Last edited:

devinwojenka23

Prominent
Apr 22, 2019
9
0
510
0
I'm not positive your power supply is the actual problem but let me tell you about this model. Computers use mainly the +12 volt power rail. A good quality power supply can deliver close to its full rated output on +12 volt.

The Everest model you listed only provides 20 amps on +12 volt. Volts x Amps = Watts, so 12volts x 20amps = 240 watts. Thats all your PSU can actually deliver where your system needs it the most. Everest labels it as a 350 watt unit, but as you can see it's far from that. I would not expect the internal components to be of high quality either. This was likely a very low cost unit but I don't know what you paid for it.

There's no 80+ certification listed for it and I could not find any protective circuitry listed for it either although I imagine it must have something to keep it from going up in smoke. What you have is a low quality power supply, with a misleading label, that probably should not be used in any computer. If possible, I'd return it for something better that can actually deliver the power it claims to be capable of, made by a reputable, well known company. Hopefully there is nothing else wrong with your system and a better power supply is all you need.
thank you so much 4 the answer,i will send the pc to a service in case there is anything i forgot .ill probably change the psu while at it.
 

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