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Sep 22, 2022
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i'm not so certain, I think it does happen on all games but to a lesser extent when it's not as graphically demanding. Something is up though, I don't think it's just the games unfortunately.
 
Sep 22, 2022
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I have a Ryzen 7 CPU/3070 GPU=

A couple of weeks ago I noticed a sort of pixelation that creates this staticy shimmering effect on vegetation in video games, initially I thought my GPU was dying so I replaced it, then I thought it was my monitor so I tried another monitor but that didn't fix it, I've gone through dozens of AA options in Nvidea's control panel and all kinds of different refresh rates, nothing I do works.

If there is any one who can help me diagnose this problem I would greatly appreciate it, I just can't tell if this a PSU/CPU/Or MOBO problem, but nothing I do fixes it and I'm not the wealthiest person so I can't afford to just replace everything.
 
Stewing on this more, you don't really have a hardware problem.
  • Screen tearing: this happens any time the video card renders and presents a frame before the current frame is done being sent to the display. Unless the video card is in perfect sync (with V-sync), there's always going to be some degree of tearing.
    • The only way to prevent this is either turn on V-Sync, or use a monitor with G-Sync/G-Sync Compatibility/FreeSync
  • Flickering and shimmering are temporal aliasing artifacts due to high contrast regions basically switching back and forth between pixels if they move.
    • If a game provides temporal anti-aliasing, this helps get rid of it
    • If you have an NVIDIA card, you can download and run NVIDIA Inspector. Under the "Negative LOD Bias", set it to 0 (or just play around with it in general). For info on what this setting does (from https://tweakguides.pcgamingwiki.com/NVFORCE_7.html)
      Texture Filtering - Negative LOD Bias: LOD is short for Level of Detail, and adjusting the LOD Bias is a method of sharpening details on textures. The LOD Bias controls texture detail by determining when different Mipmaps are used. Mipmaps are a precomputed series of textures each of a certain resolution used to improve performance. When you look at a surface close to you, a higher resolution mipmap is loaded; as you move further away from that surface, progressively lower resolution mipmaps of it are displayed instead. The default LOD Bias in a game is typically 0.0, but by using a negative value for LOD Bias (e.g. -1.5), you can force mipmap levels to be moved further away, which can improve texture sharpness at the cost of introducing shimmering when textures are in motion. In general, it is better to just use Anisotropic Filtering to improve texture detail, rather than lowering LOD Bias, as there is no shimmering and the performance impact is minor.

      The available options for this setting are Allow and Clamp. Modern games automatically set the LOD Bias, which is why this setting exists, so that you can either select Clamp to lock out and thus forcibly prevent any negative LOD Bias values from being used, or Allow it. Unfortunately, Nvidia has explicitly noted in its release notes for the GeForce drivers for several years now that: "Negative LOD bias clamp for DirectX applications is not supported on Fermi-based GPUs and later." In other words, this setting currently has no impact on the majority of games on GTX 400 and newer GPUs; you cannot prevent negative LOD bias in most games.

      It is recommended that Texture Filtering - Negative LOD Bias be set to Clamp under Global Settings, and that Anisotropic Filtering be used instead to improve texture clarity. At the moment this will only work for OpenGL games, which are relatively rare. If Nvidia re-introduces this feature for DirectX games, then the recommendation above will remain the same for optimal image quality.

      Note: For details of how to manually adjust the LOD Bias value in some games, particularly useful in counteracting certain forms of Antialiasing which introduce blurriness to the image, see the Nvidia Inspector utility covered under the Advanced Tweaking section of the guide.
 
Sep 22, 2022
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Interesting, I think what you're saying is right, but I did open my CPU to take a look at it earlier and two of the pins might be burnt, i'm not positive. Going to try this program your recomending as well. Though i think this might be the culprit (Not 100% sure they're burnt, but they don't look normal)
 
I started a few weeks ago noticing pixelation or shimmering pixels on vegetation in games. After weeks of troubleshooting and replacing what I thought was a bad GPU I finally took a look at my internals piece by piece and the only thing I've noticed wrong is some slight discoloration on the CPU pins
which does look like burnt CPU pins I found in a google image search. Would this be my culprit? I just want to make sure before buying new parts.
Parts list ??
 
Interesting, I think what you're saying is right, but I did open my CPU to take a look at it earlier and two of the pins might be burnt, i'm not positive. Going to try this program your recomending as well. Though i think this might be the culprit (Not 100% sure they're burnt, but they don't look normal)
The CPU isn't responsible for rendering graphics to the extent that you're seeing this artifact.
 
Could a bad PSU be responsible? Mine is quite old. And you're certain that this doesn't sound like a CPU issue? I'm not the richest person so i'm trying to make sure what I replace is the problem. I know you're saying this is natural and I 100% agree that to some extent you're right but the shimmering/screen tearing exceeds anything i've seen in my 20+ years of gaming
If the PSU was a problem, you'd see general hardware instability. The CPU also isn't involved in any of the actual rendering process. It essentially just tells the GPU "hey, go do stuff."
 

geofelt

Titan
I think your issue may be related to use of ray tracing/dlss/... settings.
I recently watched a comparison of various options and there was definitely some cases where background vegetation was impacted.
I am sorry, but I can't find that video to help you.
 

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