[SOLVED] Coil whine after installing new RAM [and CPU]

Jan 28, 2021
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So I had just my AMD Ryzen 5 3500X OEM replaced with a brand new Ryzen 7 5800X; on a Gigabyte X570 Aorus Ultra rev. 1.2 F30 with Windows 10 Enterprise 20H2 19042.746 x64. End everything seemed to be A-OK for 3 days

But then I also have replaced G.SKILL Ripjaws V DDR4 DIMM 3600 Mhz CL16 16 GB (2X8) [F4-3600C16D-16GVK] with also brand new G.Skill Flare X DDR4 DIMM 3200 MHz CL14 32 GB (4X8) [F4-3200C14Q-32GFX]. And this time I started to notice [during certain tasks] coil whine coming up either from the RAM or CPU [as they are to close to pin point its source]

And so what can / should I do - as silence in a must for me? [Please DO NOT write about cases and foams and whatnot; and / or return policies and RMA stuff]

Should I buy the same set of RAM from different vendor, hoping that other units of memory will work better? Or should I buy other model of RAM, as there might be some weird [thus audible] compatibility issue between a particular CPU and certain RAMs?
 

Karadjgne

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I just want you to think about something. Coil whine. And then tell me where exactly on your ram sticks or in your cpu there is a coil.

Coil whine is Always there, in every single coil in every single piece of equipment that has one or more coils. For the most part its generally of such a high pitch that even dogs may not hear it.

However, in some equipment the whine becomes more apparent due to harmonics, an integer multiplication of the base frequency in non-linear loads.

Most common culprits are motherboards, psu's and especially gpus. Never ram or cpus as they don't have coils to whine in the first place.

Basically, when performing 'certain tasks', there will be a particular frequency (data transmission) through a particular coil on your motherboard that just happens to be at that one perfectly annoying frequency that you can hear. It's totally harmless as it is always present (whether you can hear it or not) in every single other coil on the motherboard, in your psu and gpu.

The only thing you can do is change the parameters of that frequency, raising or lowering it so it doesn't hit that one annoying pitch.

Like OC the ram to 3466MHz, change the dram voltage to 1.38v, bump fclock to 1733, change BCLK from 100.00 to 100.1, bump SoC voltage 0.05v etc.
 

Karadjgne

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I just want you to think about something. Coil whine. And then tell me where exactly on your ram sticks or in your cpu there is a coil.

Coil whine is Always there, in every single coil in every single piece of equipment that has one or more coils. For the most part its generally of such a high pitch that even dogs may not hear it.

However, in some equipment the whine becomes more apparent due to harmonics, an integer multiplication of the base frequency in non-linear loads.

Most common culprits are motherboards, psu's and especially gpus. Never ram or cpus as they don't have coils to whine in the first place.

Basically, when performing 'certain tasks', there will be a particular frequency (data transmission) through a particular coil on your motherboard that just happens to be at that one perfectly annoying frequency that you can hear. It's totally harmless as it is always present (whether you can hear it or not) in every single other coil on the motherboard, in your psu and gpu.

The only thing you can do is change the parameters of that frequency, raising or lowering it so it doesn't hit that one annoying pitch.

Like OC the ram to 3466MHz, change the dram voltage to 1.38v, bump fclock to 1733, change BCLK from 100.00 to 100.1, bump SoC voltage 0.05v etc.
 
Jan 28, 2021
118
2
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[...]
think about
[...]
where exactly on your ram sticks or in your cpu there is a coil.
Me molto stupido...

[...]
the whine becomes more apparent due to harmonics, an integer multiplication of the base frequency in non-linear loads.
[...]
Now that is a valuable piece of info

Thank you for you responding in such informative way

The only thing you can do is change the parameters of that frequency, raising or lowering it so it doesn't hit that one annoying pitch.
Like
[...]
etc.
So basically I can either spend time on tweaking / overclocking or take that time and energy and just buy some other model of RAM; or just hold on and continue to await for new set of furniture in which there is suppose to be a special chamber for my machine, which right now has no case at all]
 

Karadjgne

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So basically I can either spend time on tweaking / overclocking
Stands a good chance of lowering the audible whine below the level of annoyance, possibly below the level of fan noise
or take that time and energy and just buy some other model of RAM
Which could solve the current issue if you went with a different speed, or do nothing at all to fix anything, depending on exactly what is the harmonic frequency that is pinging.

Tweaking means you have some control of the outcome, whether it works or not, replacing the ram is a crap-shoot
 
Jan 28, 2021
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With the old RAM being used it has happened once again

And so for now I have replaced the battery - but also I am trying to find some deal on new set of such niche RAM sticks [CL14 and no RGB]
 

Karadjgne

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Ah. Not something that I'd normally consider when considering 'coil whine', but then again, there are coils as a part of the switching process when the plug is pulled and Cmos goes to battery power. If one of those coils or switching components was hanging up, then the change in battery could have severed that connection enough to release the switch.

Awesome you found it and it was a relatively cheap, quick and easy fix. 👍
 

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