Comcast TG1682G Wireless

techmendz

Commendable
Dec 10, 2016
1
0
1,510
0
Greetings,

I currently have the XFinity TG1682G modem/wireless in my bedroom. From it, I am running a hardwired connection to the living into a new router that I bought hoping to extend my wireless range. Another thing, I also need to have the wireless on in the bedroom so I can't have the XFinity TG1682G modem on bridge mode. The router I bought was the TP-Link C50 v2 (AC1200). Also, in the living room where the TP-Link is located I need 2 LAN Ports for a Hue Light System and my Home Theater Received.

I wanted to know how can I go about setting both devices up so that it's only 1 wireless network. For example, if I decide to walk from the living room to the bedroom the connection will be seamless with one SSID.
 

RealBeast

Titan
Moderator
Don't change anything on the main router. On the new TP-Link set it up as an access point by connecting it with an Ethernet cable LAN port to LAN port, turn DHCP off on the TP-Link and set its IP address to one that is in the network range but outside the DHCP assignment range used in the TG1682G. And insure that your 2.4GHz radios are using different non-overlapping channels (so select from 1, 6, and 11).

The other three LAN ports on the TP-Link can be used to connect wired devices.

While you can use a single SSID, devices are not very good at picking the correct radio and also are not good at switching radios. You can try it, but I rarely find it works well in home situations unless the signal gets very very weak.

Consumer wireless radios don't support 802.11 k, v, and r (roaming protocols) in most cases (and yours don't) and many wireless devices won't make a clean drop unless you can very accurately turn down radio power.
 

RealBeast

Titan
Moderator
Don't change anything on the main router. On the new TP-Link set it up as an access point by connecting it with an Ethernet cable LAN port to LAN port, turn DHCP off on the TP-Link and set its IP address to one that is in the network range but outside the DHCP assignment range used in the TG1682G. And insure that your 2.4GHz radios are using different non-overlapping channels (so select from 1, 6, and 11).

The other three LAN ports on the TP-Link can be used to connect wired devices.

While you can use a single SSID, devices are not very good at picking the correct radio and also are not good at switching radios. You can try it, but I rarely find it works well in home situations unless the signal gets very very weak.

Consumer wireless radios don't support 802.11 k, v, and r (roaming protocols) in most cases (and yours don't) and many wireless devices won't make a clean drop unless you can very accurately turn down radio power.
 

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