Question Comments on "8 motherboard features you may not need"

Tanyac

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Aug 30, 2014
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This is not a question.
The forums do not provide a means of commenting on news, reviews and features. So this appears the only way to do it.
(https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/how-to-comment-on-news-reviews-and-features.3470045/post-20975643)

Commenting on this feature article; https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/motherboard-features-you-dont-need,6077.html

1. SATA Ports. My motherboard has 10. With 3 x NVMe M.2 drives installed I lose 6 of those ports. With 3 Optical drives I end up with capacity for 1 SATA HDD. Point being, that many motherboards sacrifice sata ports for M.2 slots. You have to be careful when selecting a motherboard how many ports you are going to lose.

2. I have a 10G XG-C100C. It's extremely slow to detect the network (12-15 seconds). ASUS don't have a fix for it, and won't even acknowledge the issues. The PC is connected to a Netgear MS510TX Multigig switch. Files transfer to my server (Which also has 10G NIC and connected to a second MS510TX), at speeds of up to 1GB/s. Average speed though is about 325MB/s in either direction. With 10 Pcs in this house, all hitting either the Kodi server, or my web/file server the faster NICs have totally eliminated slow downs caused by people hammering the network. Cost me under $1000 AUD to get 5 PCs at 2.5G, 5G and 10G, the switches being $700 of that total cost. 10G networking is not mainstream yet. Maybe in another 5 years :( There are not many 10G affordable Adapter options, and motherboard offerings are typically 2.5G and double the price of the motherboard. Definitely not worth the added cost.

3. Do you dual boot? Having a second NIC assigned to your alternate operating system stops confusion with things like WSUS, or other devices that use your MAC or IP address to identify the device. For servers, NIC teaming was worthwhile, but with 10G you can forget the complexities of setting up teaming. But with dual NICs you can also set up Load Balancing and Fail Over. In a home network, Load Balancing is essentially meaningless and irrelevant, but fail over will keep you going if one NIC should fail.

8. Correct me if I'm wrong but you don't really have a choice with video ports - don't all consumer boards have graphics (or are some manufacturers now making graphics-less boards to accommodate Intel's "F" series CPUs?). Onboard graphics can be disabled too, right? Don't want onboard graphics - buy a HEDT board at 2 to 3 times the price. Here, a X299 board will set you back as much as > $1600 AUD.
 
I thought that the ALC1220 codec is a worthy upgrade for someone without a sound card so that they can obtain better music reproduction, improved speech recognition, etc. I've never tried to A:B two computers with different codecs to compare, though. Anyone who's compared want to comment?
 
"8 motherboard features you may not need"

The operative word there is "MAY" not need.

Obviously some people have special needs. But something well above 50% of the readers of Toms Hardware are "gamers" who don't share most..if any..of those special needs.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
This is not a question.
The forums do not provide a means of commenting on news, reviews and features. So this appears the only way to do it.
(https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/how-to-comment-on-news-reviews-and-features.3470045/post-20975643)

3. Do you dual boot? Having a second NIC assigned to your alternate operating system stops confusion with things like WSUS, or other devices that use your MAC or IP address to identify the device.
Dual boot is having only one OS running at a time. Switch between the two at boot up.
A single NIC offers no confusion...whichever OS is running has full use of all the hardware.
 

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