Build Advice Compact and Lightweight Build for Music Production

amdenthusiast

Distinguished
May 23, 2010
95
0
18,630
0
Hi Guys,

I'm planning to build a desktop which will be extensively used for music production. I currently use a Dell XPS 13 and the CPU bottlenecks very easily while using virtual instruments.

My preference is for solid, stable and small components that would make it easier to move my setup. These are the specs (revised) I'm looking at -

CPU: Intel i7 10700K
CPU Cooler: Arctic Freezer II 280
Motherboard: MSI MPG B460 Gaming Edge Wifi
Chassis: Cooler Master NR200
Power Supply: Silverstone 500 W 80+ Gold Modular SFX
RAM: Corsair Dominator Platinum 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 CL15
Storage: Samsung 970 Evo Plus 1TB
OS: Win 10 Home 64-bit

I'd be happy if I can wrap this up under 1200$, but I can spend a few hundred more if necessary.

Please hit me with suggests. Thanks in advance!
 
Last edited:
Hi Guys,

I'm planning to build a desktop which will be extensively used for music production. I currently use a Dell XPS 13 (with an i5) and the CPU bottlenecks very easily while using virtual instruments.

My preference is for solid, stable and compact components that would make it easier to move my setup and these are the specs I'm looking at -

1) CPU
Between the Intel i7-10700K and i9-10900K, I'm leaning towards the i7 because I'm not sure if the two extra cores on the i9 will give me enough of a performance boost, given it costs 200$ more.

2) Motherboard
I don't even know where to start looking, but my preference is for basic expandability, solid components, and smaller sized RAM and SSD slots (if possible). Also, I don't use a thunderbolt audio interface atm and no TB connectivity isn't a deal breaker, but it would be nice addition (for future compatibility).

3) Chassis
A lightweight and compact design that fits the motherboard and has just enough space for a power supply. I don't intend to add big graphic cards and DVD drives.

4) Power Supply
Just enough juice for the CPU and the motherboard, plus a little extra maybe? Again, I don't need a monster than can power multiple graphic cards.

5) RAM
32 gigs, haven't decided on the make/model yet.

6) Storage
1Tb SSD, haven't decided on the make/model yet.


Please hit me with suggests. Thanks in advance!
Here's a build to get you started with ideas. Should be pretty close to what you want. You didn't list a budget but this is pretty basic and uses good quality parts. The motherboard can be changed if you need built-in wifi. A windows 10 license will add about another $100. The case does not include any fans so you can choose what you want if it's rgb or plain fans. Uses integrated graphics but many video cards will fit if you need more graphics processing power. You won't be able to do any overclocking without a bigger case and bigger cpu cooler.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i7-10700K 3.8 GHz 8-Core Processor ($321.27 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: NZXT Kraken M22 Liquid CPU Cooler ($79.98 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus ROG STRIX Z490-I GAMING Mini ITX LGA1200 Motherboard ($259.88 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Trident Z RGB 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory ($229.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 970 Evo 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($144.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Lian Li TU150 Mini ITX Desktop Case ($119.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair SF 450 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular SFX Power Supply ($114.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1271.09
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2021-03-12 08:17 EST-0500
 
Last edited:
Reactions: amdenthusiast

amdenthusiast

Distinguished
May 23, 2010
95
0
18,630
0
Here's a build to get you started with ideas. Should be pretty close to what you want. You didn't list a budget but this is pretty basic and uses good quality parts. The motherboard can be changed if you need built-in wifi. A windows 10 license will add about another $100. The case does not include any fans so you can choose what you want if it's rgb or plain fans. Uses integrated graphics but many video cards will fit if you need more graphics processing power. You won't be able to do any overclocking without a bigger case and bigger cpu cooler.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i7-10700K 3.8 GHz 8-Core Processor ($321.27 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: NZXT Kraken M22 Liquid CPU Cooler ($79.98 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus ROG STRIX Z490-I GAMING Mini ITX LGA1200 Motherboard ($259.88 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Trident Z RGB 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory ($229.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 970 Evo 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($144.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Lian Li TU150 Mini ITX Desktop Case ($119.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair SF 450 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular SFX Power Supply ($114.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1271.09
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2021-03-12 08:17 EST-0500
Thanks for the reply.

I've been reading and trying to figure things out, but the biggest confusion for me right now is which chipset motherboard to go for. There's 400 series and then the latest 500, and among these there's Z, H, B, etc..

Can you please first help me identify which one of these would be ideal for me?

Also, I don't want to spend too much money on a motherboard that gives me overclocking features, "high end" audio, and fancy looks because none of that is useful for me.
 
Last edited:
Look for that board to start showing up on sites such as Newegg and Amazon by the end of next week.

https://www.gigabyte.com/us/Motherboard/B560I-AORUS-PRO-AX-rev-10#kf
GIGABYTE B560I AORUS PRO AX (Audio Chipset: Realtek ALC4080)

https://www.newegg.com/intel-core-i7-10700-core-i7-10th-gen/p/N82E16819118126
Intel Core i7-10700 $284.99

https://www.amazon.com/Antec-0-761345-10923-9-A40PRO/dp/B01HLAB80C/
Antec 0-761345-10923-9 A40 Pro Processor Cooler $27.99

https://www.newegg.com/corsair-32gb-288-pin-ddr4-sdram/p/N82E16820236541
CORSAIR Vengeance LPX 32GB (2 x 16GB) 288-Pin DDR4 SDRAM DDR4 3200 (PC4 25600) CL16 Intel XMP 2.0 Desktop Memory $159.99

https://www.anandtech.com/show/16343/intel-core-i710700-vs-core-i710700k-review-is-65w-comet-lake-an-option

https://antec.com/product/cooling/a40-pro.php
 
Last edited:
Reactions: amdenthusiast
Thanks for the reply.

I've been reading and trying to figure things out, but the biggest confusion for me right now is which chipset motherboard to go for. There's 400 series and then the latest 500, and among these there's Z, H, B, etc..

Can you please first help me identify which one of these would be ideal for me?

Also, I don't want to spend too much money on a motherboard that gives me overclocking features, "high end" audio, and fancy looks because none of that is useful for me.
You don't need a 'K' processor if you won't be overclocking or a 'Z' board. A B460 board will be fine unless you want to wait until B560 boards have hit the stores.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i7-10700 2.9 GHz 8-Core Processor ($274.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock B460M-ITX/ac Mini ITX LGA1200 Motherboard ($132.69 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($159.99 @ Best Buy)
Storage: Samsung 970 Evo 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($144.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Cooler Master MasterBox NR200 Mini ITX Desktop Case ($102.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair SF 450 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular SFX Power Supply ($114.99 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($108.78 @ Other World Computing)
Total: $1039.41
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2021-03-12 15:15 EST-0500
 
Reactions: amdenthusiast

amdenthusiast

Distinguished
May 23, 2010
95
0
18,630
0
You don't need a 'K' processor if you won't be overclocking or a 'Z' board. A B460 board will be fine unless you want to wait until B560 boards have hit the stores.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i7-10700 2.9 GHz 8-Core Processor ($274.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock B460M-ITX/ac Mini ITX LGA1200 Motherboard ($132.69 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($159.99 @ Best Buy)
Storage: Samsung 970 Evo 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($144.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Cooler Master MasterBox NR200 Mini ITX Desktop Case ($102.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair SF 450 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular SFX Power Supply ($114.99 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($108.78 @ Other World Computing)
Total: $1039.41
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2021-03-12 15:15 EST-0500
Guys there has been an impulsive buy from my side. I just picked up an i9 10850K at a huge discount, basically at the price of an i7 10700K. Now even thought I don't intend to overclock my PC, I figured that the extra horsepower of the 4 added threads will definitely make a difference in the long run.

I understand that with this decision, other components will have to be reconsidered. Firstly, given the power hungry nature of this CPU, I definitely want to invest in a decent single or dual fan liquid cooling solution. I was looking at the Arctic Liquid Freezer II 120 since it is available at a good price. But I would consider the Freezer II 240 if needed, please let me know.

Also, I've been reading that a good cooling solution along with power limits disabled, pushes the turbo on these i9 chips to around 4.8/4.7ghz on all cores (stable). I think that should be enough for me and overclocking this CPU to gain a marginal added performance of 200mhz, at the cost of significantly more heat, power consumption and instability is not something that interests me.

All that being said, do you think this particular motherboard would be good enough for my needs?
MSI MPG B460I Mini-ITX

Over here, the cost of a Z490 ITX board is pretty much the twice of this MSI board and I don't see the point in investing so much money on a motherboard.
BUT
If you think that MSI MPG B460I might actually bottleneck the performance of this CPU even at stock settings, or would run too hot, or unstable, I would rather consider moving the the Z490 Micro-ATX platform since it is available at a similar price point.

Also the main reason for sticking to the ITX platform is that a compact setup will definitely help me and I really doubt I'm ever gonna need more than one PCIe slot, which is provided on the motherboard, and there's enough storage and RAM.

Once the cooling solution and motherboard is finalized, I'll be on my way to getting this build ready.

Thanks again for the input guys!
 
Last edited:
Guys there has been an impulsive buy from my side. I just picked up an i9 10850K at a huge discount, basically at the price of an i7 10700K. Now even thought I don't intend to overclock my PC, I figured that the extra horsepower of the 4 added threads will definitely make a difference in the long run.

I understand that with this decision, other components will have to be reconsidered. Firstly, given the power hungry nature of this CPU, I definitely want to invest in a decent single or dual fan liquid cooling solution. I was looking at the Arctic Liquid Freezer II 120 since it is available at a good price. But I would consider the Freezer II 240 if needed, please let me know.

Also, I've been reading that a good cooling solution along with power limits disabled, pushes the turbo on these i9 chips to around 4.8/4.7ghz on all cores (stable). I think that should be enough for me and overclocking this CPU to gain a marginal added performance of 200mhz, at the cost of significantly more heat, power consumption and instability is not something that interests me.

All that being said, do you think this particular motherboard would be good enough for my needs?
MSI MPG B460I Mini-ITX

Over here, the cost of a Z490 ITX board is pretty much the twice of this MSI board and I don't see the point in investing so much money on a motherboard.
BUT
If you think that MSI MPG B460I might actually bottleneck the performance of this CPU even at stock settings, or would run too hot, or unstable, I would rather consider moving the the Z490 Micro-ATX platform since it is available at a similar price point.

Also the main reason for sticking to the ITX platform is that a compact setup will definitely help me and I really doubt I'm ever gonna need more than one PCIe slot, which is provided on the motherboard, and there's enough storage and RAM.

Once the cooling solution and motherboard is finalized, I'll be on my way to getting this build ready.

Thanks again for the input guys!
I think you'll probably have to abandon the ITX configuration for that CPU. You'll need a robust cooler and a 120mm is not going to cut it. It's going to run on the hotter side even without overclock. I'd use at least a 280mm myself. You'll need a 'Z' board with XMP to get faster ram running up to speed, like 3600mhz., even if you don't overclock the CPU. If you can find an ITX case that supports a 280mm AIO, no less than 240mm, then you can probably still use an ITX configuration. If you crank up all cores above 4 Ghz. a 280mm AIO may not even do the job.
 

amdenthusiast

Distinguished
May 23, 2010
95
0
18,630
0
I think you'll probably have to abandon the ITX configuration for that CPU. You'll need a robust cooler and a 120mm is not going to cut it. It's going to run on the hotter side even without overclock. I'd use at least a 280mm myself. You'll need a 'Z' board with XMP to get faster ram running up to speed, like 3600mhz., even if you don't overclock the CPU. If you can find an ITX case that supports a 280mm AIO, no less than 240mm, then you can probably still use an ITX configuration. If you crank up all cores above 4 Ghz. a 280mm AIO may not even do the job.
Hi Arch,

If that's the case, I do have the option of returning the 10850K and going for the 10700K instead. How I plan to use it is by removing power limits so that the 4.7ghz turbo can be sustained indefinitely across all cores, that will be plenty of performance. Because of that I've also decided to go for a 240mm AIO on this build.

What do you think about this? Does it need changes according to you?

PCPartPicker Part List: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/Dwm7Bc

CPU: Intel Core i7-10700K 3.8 GHz 8-Core Processor ($326.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100x 57.2 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.99 @ Corsair)
Motherboard: MSI MPG B460I GAMING EDGE WIFI Mini ITX LGA1200 Motherboard
Memory: Corsair Dominator Platinum 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 CL15 Memory ($184.99 @ Corsair)
Storage: Samsung 970 Evo Plus 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($160.74 @ Amazon)
Case: Cooler Master MasterBox NR200 Mini ITX Desktop Case ($97.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Silverstone 500 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular SFX Power Supply ($105.98 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($108.78 @ Other World Computing)
Total: $1084.46
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2021-03-15 10:20 EDT-0400
 

punkncat

Honorable
Ambassador
Straight up would not put a 125W TDP chip inside a m-ITX case, at all. IF you are absolutely going to insist, I would look at all mesh cases along the lines of the Cooler Master Elite (cubes) and such. Bit of warning concerning those cases (I have used two of them in the past). The main air flow for that particular case is a big front mounted fan. After a couple of months it will have a dust outline in such a way that the case doesn't readily come apart to be able to clean out. The front of them gets downright unattractive after a year or so of use.
 
Reactions: amdenthusiast

amdenthusiast

Distinguished
May 23, 2010
95
0
18,630
0
Straight up would not put a 125W TDP chip inside a m-ITX case, at all. IF you are absolutely going to insist, I would look at all mesh cases along the lines of the Cooler Master Elite (cubes) and such. Bit of warning concerning those cases (I have used two of them in the past). The main air flow for that particular case is a big front mounted fan. After a couple of months it will have a dust outline in such a way that the case doesn't readily come apart to be able to clean out. The front of them gets downright unattractive after a year or so of use.
Thanks for the advice, this is basically what I'm trying to understand. For instance if you watch this video, this guy seems to be doing pretty well - Hackintosh with Thunderbolt 3

If I compare my specs to his, I'm hard pressed to ask the question - A 240mm AIO + 1x92mm + 4x20mm fans are STILL NOT ENOUGH to keep the 10700K cool!?
 
Last edited:

madmatt30

Titan
Ambassador
Straight up would not put a 125W TDP chip inside a m-ITX case, at all. IF you are absolutely going to insist, I would look at all mesh cases along the lines of the Cooler Master Elite (cubes) and such. Bit of warning concerning those cases (I have used two of them in the past). The main air flow for that particular case is a big front mounted fan. After a couple of months it will have a dust outline in such a way that the case doesn't readily come apart to be able to clean out. The front of them gets downright unattractive after a year or so of use.
You're underestimating how good a case the Nr200 actually is.

Thanks for the advice, this is basically what I'm trying to understand. For instance if you watch this video, this guy seems to be doing pretty well - Hackintosh with Thunderbolt 3

If I compare my specs to his, I'm hard pressed to ask the question - A 240mm AIO, and 2x120mm (bottom) and 1x120mm (front) intake fans + 2x120mm top exhaust fans is STILL NOT ENOUGH to keep the 10700K cool!?
10700k would be fine in that nr200, side mounted 240/280mm aio as intake and just use the stock 92mm/120mm top and rear exhaust fans that are included with the case

You're not using a gpu, you don't need to add any more cooling.

You could run a 10850k in there imo but you're going to pay a fortune for a z series mitx board that's good enough to cope with it.
 
Reactions: amdenthusiast

g-unit1111

Titan
Moderator
Straight up would not put a 125W TDP chip inside a m-ITX case, at all. IF you are absolutely going to insist, I would look at all mesh cases along the lines of the Cooler Master Elite (cubes) and such. Bit of warning concerning those cases (I have used two of them in the past). The main air flow for that particular case is a big front mounted fan. After a couple of months it will have a dust outline in such a way that the case doesn't readily come apart to be able to clean out. The front of them gets downright unattractive after a year or so of use.
I also wouldn't pair it with any of the PSUs mentioned so far, especially one called "500W SFX". Use a generic PSU in this rig and it will end badly. Especially if you use any of the current Intel CPUs in said build.

Also in regards to Hackintosh - it's not a substitute for a real Mac. Emulation software is not the substitute for the real thing.
 

amdenthusiast

Distinguished
May 23, 2010
95
0
18,630
0
I also wouldn't pair it with any of the PSUs mentioned so far, especially one called "500W SFX". Use a generic PSU in this rig and it will end badly. Especially if you use any of the current Intel CPUs in said build.

Also in regards to Hackintosh - it's not a substitute for a real Mac. Emulation software is not the substitute for the real thing.
By SFX I meant to indicate the form factor, as opposed to an ATX PSU which doesn't fit in the NR200. I'll be using a good quality 500W Corsair/CM/Silvterstone SFX PSU with 80+ Gold rating.
 

amdenthusiast

Distinguished
May 23, 2010
95
0
18,630
0
10700k would be fine in that nr200, side mounted 240/280mm aio as intake and just use the stock 92mm/120mm top and rear exhaust fans that are included with the case

You're not using a gpu, you don't need to add any more cooling.

You could run a 10850k in there imo but you're going to pay a fortune for a z series mitx board that's good enough to cope with it.
Thanks for your reply. This is also what I've been thinking, but I just want to be really sure before I buy the rest of the hardware. Do you think any changes that should be made to this build - https://pcpartpicker.com/list/Dwm7Bc ?
 
Last edited:

g-unit1111

Titan
Moderator
By SFX I meant to indicate the form factor, as opposed to an ATX PSU which doesn't fit in the NR200. I'll be using a good quality 500W Corsair/CM/Silvterstone SFX PSU with 80+ Gold rating.
Cooler Master and Silverstone aren't exactly trusted brands, especially in the SFX category. But then again every manufacturer has some quality units and some that are total junkers, and that's what you need to watch out for. If you're not running a GPU and running just off the onboard video, I can kind of see getting away with it. But even then I still wouldn't go cheap on the PSU as it is the life blood of your PC.

You need a quality supply - preferably a Seasonic, or one that's Seasonic manufactured. You don't just want to grab any 80+ Gold PSUs, that's not typically a guarantee that it's going to be quality. I've seen plenty of units over the years rated 80+ Gold that are just absolute garbage. The efficiency rating of the PSU is not necessarily a guarantee of the quality of components underneath the unit that make it work. Especially in the ITX and HTPC form factors - quality units are few and far between.

These are a few quality units that you want to consider:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/BtsmP6/corsair-sf-600w-80-platinum-certified-fully-modular-sfx-power-supply-cp-9020182-na
https://pcpartpicker.com/product/hxPgXL/fsp-group-dagger-pro-650-w-80-gold-certified-fully-modular-sfx-power-supply-sda2-650

I have the first PSU in my HTPC and I can vouch that it is a quality PSU.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: amdenthusiast

madmatt30

Titan
Ambassador
Cooler Master and Silverstone aren't exactly trusted brands, especially in the SFX category. But then again every manufacturer has some quality units and some that are total junkers, and that's what you need to watch out for. If you're not running a GPU and running just off the onboard video, I can kind of see getting away with it. But even then I still wouldn't go cheap on the PSU as it is the life blood of your PC.

You need a quality supply - preferably a Seasonic, or one that's Seasonic manufactured. You don't just want to grab any 80+ Gold PSUs, that's not typically a guarantee that it's going to be quality. I've seen plenty of units over the years rated 80+ Gold that are just absolute garbage. The efficiency rating of the PSU is not necessarily a guarantee of the quality of components underneath the unit that make it work. Especially in the ITX and HTPC form factors - quality units are few and far between.

These are a few quality units that you want to consider:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/BtsmP6/corsair-sf-600w-80-platinum-certified-fully-modular-sfx-power-supply-cp-9020182-na
https://pcpartpicker.com/product/hxPgXL/fsp-group-dagger-pro-650-w-80-gold-certified-fully-modular-sfx-power-supply-sda2-650

I have the first PSU in my HTPC and I can vouch that it is a quality PSU.
That silverstone looks fairly decent with a few small caveats in all fairness.

I suppose it depends on the op's location/market.

Usa/uk the seasonic sgx is literally a few dollars more and is a lot better unit but it may not be available in other countries.

Its a shame that the nr200 is absolutely capable of taking a full atx psu but coolermaster haven't seen fit to produce an adapter bracket for it.

Sfx psu's are sooo overpriced imo.
 

punkncat

Honorable
Ambassador
Be aware that many reviews complain of the harness length of the Silverstone SFX PSU, in particular.

I would take a moment to look at the connector placement on whatever mobo you choose, in relation to the case's PSU placement. It appears that the aforementioned NR200 puts it in a good spot if you aren't completely concerned with cable management.
I personally utilize one of the Corsair SFX models and it has been really good on a Ryzen 7 and GTX 1080, where others have failed.

I have to be honest in saying that I went through a 'phase' of desire to build m-ITX cases with powerful equipment. Access and issues cleaning, lack of additional RAM slots to upgrade down the road, heat, fitment issues.....the headaches go on and on. I cannot recommend enough going with at LEAST a m-ATX format for your build. Just my .02
 

g-unit1111

Titan
Moderator
That silverstone looks fairly decent with a few small caveats in all fairness.

I suppose it depends on the op's location/market.

Usa/uk the seasonic sgx is literally a few dollars more and is a lot better unit but it may not be available in other countries.

Its a shame that the nr200 is absolutely capable of taking a full atx psu but coolermaster haven't seen fit to produce an adapter bracket for it.

Sfx psu's are sooo overpriced imo.
Yeah that's true and I do agree that SFX PSUs are overpriced. I'm looking to do a new SFX build soon and finding a PSU for that purpose is getting to be ridiculous. Though finding any quality PSU right now is pretty tricky given shortages exist.
 
Thanks for your reply. This is also what I've been thinking, but I just want to be really sure before I buy the rest of the hardware. Do you think any changes that should be made to this build - https://pcpartpicker.com/list/Dwm7Bc ?
It looks ok but the non 'K' i7-10700 would be a bit easier to cool at 65 watts vs the 'K' at 125 watts while still performing well and with a b460 board you can't overclock anyways. Also, the Corsair or Seasonic PSU's I listed are better choices IMO.
 

amdenthusiast

Distinguished
May 23, 2010
95
0
18,630
0
Hi Guys,

I decided to put things on hold until the 11th gen would the stores, and now, after considering the price and performance difference, I finally went on and got the 10700K, running on a Z590M board. The mATX board (as opposed to ITX) gives me an option to upgrade ram and nvme storage and will stay cooler, so it made more sense practically.

The system is running great and I'm happy with the performance and temperatures (idle and under full load).

Here are the specs-
CPU: Intel i7 10700K
Motherboard: Asus Prime Z590M Plus
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100x
Power Supply: Corsair RM650
RAM: Corsair Vengeance 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600
Storage: Samsung 970 Evo Plus 500GB + WD SN550 2TB
Chassis: Cooler Master Q311L
OS: Win 10 Home 64-bit


Thanks for all the advice!
 
Last edited:

amdenthusiast

Distinguished
May 23, 2010
95
0
18,630
0
All that being said, there's a minor inconsistency in monitoring. It hasn't really been bugging me, but I thought I'd ask what's up.

Basically, the chassis fans are not being monitored properly and HWMonitor/Asus's fan tuning utility in the bios shows them to be running at 4000rpm which is impossible. It mimics the rpm of the AIO pump, and that's a bit weird.

Any suggestions on how to fix this?
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS