[SOLVED] Comparing 2 RAM sticks, different speeds, which one will be faster ?

Reece Fuller

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Ram 1: Crucial Ballistix Tactical Tracer RGB 16GB (1 x 16GB) 3000MHz DDR4

Ram 2: KLEVV BOLT X 16GB (16GB x 1) 3200MHz DDR4

The reason I am asking is I just got the 2nd ram stick (Ram 2) and used it in my pc and its speed shows up as 2666mhz. I initially thought I got sent the wrong RAM. After research, I found out that that is normal, and that I need to enable XMP to push the RAM to 3200mhz.

But now my older RAM stick (Ram 1) had if I can say Stock speed at 3000mhz RAM, I never enabled XMP on the other pc and was running at 3000mhz out the box.

I was wondering without missioning to swap out the rams and test, which one would be a better choice?

Also with regards to what each of their maximum speed could be, I assume, because RAM 2 has a higher base speed it could be pushed higher? but it also might be that somehow it was set to run at 3000mhz out the box is this possible?

Thanks, your help is appreciated greatly.

My PC Specs:

CPU: Intel 11th Gen Core i5-11400
RAM: In Question
GPU: Zotac Geforce GTX1060 Mini Graphics Card - 3GB
Motherboard: ASUS TUF Gaming Z590-PLUS WIFI Intel ATX Motherboard
PSU: Fractal Design FD-PSU-IONP-660P-BK Ion+ 660W 80 Plus Platinum Certified Fully Modular Desktop Power Supply
 

mikewinddale

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The difference between the two sticks seems to be that one uses JEDEC (industry standard) profiles while the other uses XMP (Intel specific) profiles.

Apparently, the first stick has a 3000 MHz JEDEC profile, while the second stick has a 2666 JEDEC and a 3200 XMP.

When XMP is not enabled, your motherboard will rely on JEDEC.

It's not really a question of what's faster, but rather, what is more compatible and easier to set up.

Personally, I prefer JEDEC over XMP because JEDEC is industry standard and requires no special motherboard settings.

Honestly, I don't know what happens if you install a JEDEC module and an XMP module simultaneously. Will the motherboard use JEDEC for one and XMP for the other? I don't know. All my motherboards are AMD and all my RAM is JEDEC, so I've never had a chance to try out XMP.

But I am skeptical. My guess is that unless both modules are XMP, the board will use the common JEDEC standard. And since one module is 2666 JEDEC, both modules will run at the common speed of 2666. Typically, when you mix multiple modules, they run at the lowest common setting, which here, is 2666 JEDEC.

Your best bet is to get two identical modules. But if you can't, install both at once and see if your system boots. If your system fails to boot, just remove one module or the other. You won't damage your system. And if your system does boot, then enable XMP and see what MHz you get.
 
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Reece Fuller

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I don't really want to test it, because currently Ram 1 is in the other pc, and I'd have to swop and test and swop and test. I was hoping for just a quick answer.
If someone had experience with this or knew just generally which would be the better option.
 

Reece Fuller

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Well, I assumed I was losing out on some performance, also I got a bundle and the RAM included was 3200mhz. Also, I am 95% certain that the RAM can run at 3200mhz because the MB is good and the Ram 2 is rated for 3200mhz and so I might as well do it. Currently, I am running Ram 2 at 2666mhz so I want the better 1 and then overclock.

I am literally just wondering which one would be better to use...

Just also curious about the "base speeds" (because Ram 1 is higher) and if that could mean the ram could be overclocked higher. I just want to overclock the RAM and I would prefer to use the better one.. as well because I have never done it and it'll be fun.
 
The performance of ram depends not only on the max speed, but also the cas timings.
Your link does not show the crucial timings.
The clevvv show 16. You will often find that the speed divided by the cas will come out to about 200, making the ram performance more similar.

The real big difference is using dual channel.
Iif you care about ram performance you want a dual channel matched kit to get the advertised performance.

Fortunately, 11400 processors do very well with slow ram if that is what you need to do.
It makes a difference with integrated graphics, but not with your discrete gtx1060 card.
 
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Reece Fuller

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Your MB should run anything up to 3200 without using XMP.
I would try each stick separately and see what they run at.
I would try them together and see what they run at.
Then I would decide what to do.
Would together be safe? is it easy to test and could it be unsafe?
 

jay32267

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Would together be safe? is it easy to test and could it be unsafe?
You won't ruin anything by trying two sticks together.
The worst that will happen is it won't boot.
I think chances are good they will run together.
Don't change anything in the BIOS,
Don't mess with XMP.
If it boots....check the speed and they're running at.
I think they will run at 2666 or 3000.
 
Would together be safe? is it easy to test and could it be unsafe?
Safe enough to try.
To test,
Run memtest86 or memtest86+
They boot from a usb stick and do not use windows.
You can download them here:
If you can run a full pass with NO errors, your ram should be ok.

Running several more passes will sometimes uncover an issue, but it takes more time.
Probably not worth it unless you really suspect a ram issue.
 
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mikewinddale

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Dec 22, 2016
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The difference between the two sticks seems to be that one uses JEDEC (industry standard) profiles while the other uses XMP (Intel specific) profiles.

Apparently, the first stick has a 3000 MHz JEDEC profile, while the second stick has a 2666 JEDEC and a 3200 XMP.

When XMP is not enabled, your motherboard will rely on JEDEC.

It's not really a question of what's faster, but rather, what is more compatible and easier to set up.

Personally, I prefer JEDEC over XMP because JEDEC is industry standard and requires no special motherboard settings.

Honestly, I don't know what happens if you install a JEDEC module and an XMP module simultaneously. Will the motherboard use JEDEC for one and XMP for the other? I don't know. All my motherboards are AMD and all my RAM is JEDEC, so I've never had a chance to try out XMP.

But I am skeptical. My guess is that unless both modules are XMP, the board will use the common JEDEC standard. And since one module is 2666 JEDEC, both modules will run at the common speed of 2666. Typically, when you mix multiple modules, they run at the lowest common setting, which here, is 2666 JEDEC.

Your best bet is to get two identical modules. But if you can't, install both at once and see if your system boots. If your system fails to boot, just remove one module or the other. You won't damage your system. And if your system does boot, then enable XMP and see what MHz you get.
 
Reactions: Reece Fuller

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