[SOLVED] Complete garbage or can I push it

CRITICALThinker

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Feb 2, 2014
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I really should know the answer by the point I ask it, but I am putting together a price to performance PC, have a e3 1225 v3, motherboard, 8gb of ram and a case lined up. I just have to find a video card (leaning towards gtx 950 or 1050ti but I might have more luck finding an rx 470.

The question is, can I use this PSU I have laying around: (or a slightly older identical model only has a single PCIE vs dual)
http://www.retailplus.com/products/465w-power-supply/retail-plus-465w-power-supply
Is this a disaster waiting to happen or should it function or should I try it? worst case I nab a VX450 locally for ~$15 and add that to the price.
 

jonnyguru

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LOL! That's some old stock from the mid 90's. It's actually illegal in most countries.

Note the 115/230V switch on the back. That means the PSU doesn't have power factor correction. It uses a voltage doubler to correct low mains voltage so the PSU can function in those regions.

No PFC
No 80 PLUS efficiency

That PSU is the sketchy thing I've seen all month.
 
I wouldn't use that PSU model on any gaming PC. Looks like some generic model to me. It's better you stay away from such power supply brands and models.

Don't cheap out on the power supply. PSU is the last component you might want to cheap out on, or skimp.

Try to get some other high quality PSU, IF possible. Power supplies are an imperative part of your system that should not be taken lightly. Throwing in a budget PSU could result in poor power efficiency or even a wrecked system. Don't SKIMP on the PSU,, since this is the MOST important PC component. I can't stress this enough.

Just my 2 cents.
 
Last edited:

AngelTech

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May 18, 2019
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If you want a cheap PSU that is still 80+ certified, I would check out some of Cooler Masters offerings. I have worked with them before and have had no problems.
Depends on the model as some of the cooler master PSUs are not very quality ofc anything would be better than the PSU in the link but still, the best budget PSU to my knowledge is the newer model Corsair CX Series.
 
Reactions: Metal Messiah.

jonnyguru

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To put that in a math equation that may make it easier to understand (Wait.... Math makes it EASIER?!?)....

True Power is measured in Watts.

Apparent power is measured in VA.

V * A = W.

W / PF = VA.

So if you have a fully loaded 500W PSU with a PF of .99 (pretty typical these days), then your VA is 505.

If you have the OP's PSU, the PF is probably .60. So a fully loaded 500W PSU without PFC would have a VA of 833.

In other words, you're CONSUMING 500W either way, but the mains have to work as hard as it would to deliver 833W if you don't have PFC.

The most common place you see this equation is with UPS's. Notice why a 1000VA UPS only supports 600W? Well, it's a bit of "backwards marketing". The VA is irrelevant. But higher numbers like "1000VA" are easier to market and now the whole industry follows suit (like gas prices always ending with 9/10 of a penny). In reality, the UPS can support 600W. The fact that it supports 1000VA simply means it can support a PSU without PFC.
 

SierraArgo

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May 25, 2017
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Typically when I am looking at power supplies, I like to make sure they have an 80+ certification at the very least. Additionally, it is a good idea to buy from reputable vendors (some cheap PSU's have a tendency to fail, sometimes in spectacular fashion) If I were you I would get a newer PSU, even if it means spending a bit more.
 
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jonnyguru

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Lack of power factor correction in non-linear loads (like a PSU) makes the apparent power much greater than real power, so while your actual watt-hours consumption may be the same between two different PSUs, one with PFC and one without, the mains delivery has to "work harder" to deliver the power.

Instead of billing everyone by their VA usage instead of watt hours or joules (not sure how you'd do that without replacing EVERYONES meter) the EU (and some other regions) banned the sale of non-linear products without PFC.
 

SierraArgo

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May 25, 2017
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Depends on the model as some of the cooler master PSUs are not very quality ofc anything would be better than the PSU in the link but still, the best budget PSU to my knowledge is the newer model Corsair CX Series.
This is true. Corsair has some pretty decent units for not too much. I personally run a CS650M and its a champ.
 
Reactions: Metal Messiah.

PC Tailor

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A potato does a better job of delivering power than that power supply. So I wouldn't say to even use that PSU to power a potato.

https://www.wikihow.com/Create-a-Potato-Battery
I was just generally enjoying this thread until I legit saw a link to potato batteries.
Well played sir. Well played.

Out of curiosity, why is it actually illegal? Or is it purely the age?
 
Reactions: Metal Messiah.
To put that in a math equation that may make it easier to understand (Wait.... Math makes it EASIER?!?)....

True Power is measured in Watts.

Apparent power is measured in VA.

V * A = W.

W / PF = VA.

So if you have a fully loaded 500W PSU with a PF of .99 (pretty typical these days), then your VA is 505.

If you have the OP's PSU, the PF is probably .60. So a fully loaded 500W PSU without PFC would have a VA of 833.

In other words, you're CONSUMING 500W either way, but the mains have to work as hard as it would to deliver 833W if you don't have PFC.

The most common place you see this equation is with UPS's. Notice why a 1000VA UPS only supports 600W? Well, it's a bit of "backwards marketing". The VA is irrelevant. But higher numbers like "1000VA" are easier to market and now the whole industry follows suit (like gas prices always ending with 9/10 of a penny). In reality, the UPS can support 600W. The fact that it supports 1000VA simply means it can support a PSU without PFC.
Would the lack of Active PFC also generate more heat?
 

CRITICALThinker

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Feb 2, 2014
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Well I think it's save to say I'll be taking this to the Eco-center when I drop off some other old parts, I'll use an old 650W Antec unit and try and pick up another one to go where that was. Theres a 750W CXM unit on the used market in my city I might nab for $40

Thanks for all the replies, it has been thoroughly entertaining. Feel free to bash the PSU some more because I think it deserves it before I put it to rest.
 

jonnyguru

Distinguished
Well I think it's save to say I'll be taking this to the Eco-center when I drop off some other old parts, I'll use an old 650W Antec unit and try and pick up another one to go where that was. Theres a 750W CXM unit on the used market in my city I might nab for $40

Thanks for all the replies, it has been thoroughly entertaining. Feel free to bash the PSU some more because I think it deserves it before I put it to rest.
You really need 750W?
 

CRITICALThinker

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Feb 2, 2014
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You really need 750W?
No, I definitely don't but the other option is a 450W VX series that at its age I'm not sure what I can trust it with and what not. I'm building this computer for fun and to sell, it isn't something I need.

the 750W would be used for testing. usually I would choose between a solid tier 1 or 2 500-650W unit for a reasonably powerful mid range build.
 

SierraArgo

Commendable
May 25, 2017
19
3
1,515
0
Typically when I am looking at power supplies, I like to make sure they have an 80+ certification at the very least. Additionally, it is a good idea to buy from reputable vendors (some cheap PSU's have a tendency to fail, sometimes in spectacular fashion) If I were you I would get a newer PSU, even if it means spending a bit more.
If you want a cheap PSU that is still 80+ certified, I would check out some of Cooler Masters offerings. I have worked with them before and have had no problems.
 

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