Computer Connected to Internet, but not Sending and Receiving Packets

May 20, 2018
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Computer connects to the internet just fine and am able to load pages, but when starting download or just sitting at idle no packets send or receive. For example I can load this forum and am actually writing on the same computer, but the packets seem to only come maybe every 5 seconds so I have to time it correctly if I want to load or refresh a page. However when I launch steam and it starts updating, it varies on how far it will get, but the internet will spike up and start the download but rarely get past half way, before the packets drop back to zero. Downloading items from websites will start, but will eventually stop and have the network error message. YouTube videos work well enough since they buffer enough to play before the next round of packets arrive and usually don't freeze unless I put it on 4k. When installing a few windows updates everything went fine, and the packets flowed smoothly, but as soon as I tried to open any other program that needed internet the whole thing crashed and went back to zero. When the computer is trying to download anything the packets just stop totally and task manger has 0 for send and receive.

I've already tried reinstall drivers, I've reset network settings, and have even reinstalled windows, but the problem persists. I've messed with duplex settings, flow settings, manually entering ipv4s and 6s, but have had no luck. I've reset bios thinking maybe something was wrong there but no fix. I've run countless commands through command prompt, and still can't get anything to work.

I have never had any issue like this and have searched the forums for the past couple of hours looking for someone with the same issue. I only found a couple of really old posts, with windows xp. I tried to find the similar settings mentioned in them, but still no luck.

I know very little about networking, but can follow guides and usually do well troubleshooting problems. However I am totally stuck here. I figure people will want to see ipconfig /all information, so I will just provide everything I can think of being important.

CPU: i5 8600k
MB: Asus Z370-A
Intel(R) Ethernet connection (2) i219-V driver version: 12.15.22.6
Windows 10 64bit pro OS Build: 17134.1

Ipconfig /all information (Pasted directly from command prompt)

Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : DESKTOP-JPK620N
Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :
Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

Ethernet adapter Ethernet:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel(R) Ethernet Connection (2) I219-V
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : B0-6E-BF-C1-3A-28
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2601:cd:4000:b232::c5af(Preferred)
Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Sunday, May 20, 2018 8:30:37 PM
Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Sunday, May 27, 2018 8:18:27 PM
IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2601:cd:4000:b232:ec4a:a83c:d7d0:b840(Preferred)
Temporary IPv6 Address. . . . . . : 2601:cd:4000:b232:3887:79be:52ab:140e(Preferred)
Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::ec4a:a83c:d7d0:b840%13(Preferred)
IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 10.0.0.90(Preferred)
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : fe80::68ee:96ff:fe39:8571%13
10.0.0.1
DHCPv6 IAID . . . . . . . . . . . : 229666495
DHCPv6 Client DUID. . . . . . . . : 00-01-00-01-22-93-D8-A1-B0-6E-BF-C1-3A-28
DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:558:feed::1
2001:558:feed::2
NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled
 
Suggest you try some speed and line quality tests first:

https://sourceforge.net/speedtest/ - You're looking for low latency, speed consistency, rather than max speed, and preferably next to no jitter.

https://www.thinkbroadband.com/speedtest (also varying sizes of file download on several ports to see if issues are port-specific - https://www.thinkbroadband.com/download). I suggest any file size that ought to be around 1 minute or so for testing.

One thing that springs to mind is the DNS server(s) in use. I don't see any IPv4 DNS servers listed, which suggests you're either on IPv6, or the DNS servers are auto-allocated from the router??? My network knowledge is strictly IPv4, so if you are on IPv6, I'll pass.

However, if IPv4 is your Local Area Connection (ipconfig said 10.0.0.90 preferred), you should look into your Local Area Conenction settings and throw a couple of DNS servers into the config:

Local Area Connection / Properties / Highlight IPv4 / Properties / Use the Following DNS server addresses

If there are already some there, take a note for later. Either way, try setting the preferred primary as 1.1.1.1 and the secondary as 1.0.0.1 and see if that does anything at all. Alternatively you can use cmd to do it:

https://helpdeskgeek.com/networking/change-ip-address-and-dns-servers-using-the-command-prompt/

In fact you can run netsh and see your interface(s) configs that way too. See how things go.
 

stdragon

Commendable
Apr 5, 2018
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From a command prompt, type in (without quotes) "ping 8.8.8.8 /t" and check for pack-loss and high latency. If you see periodic loss even with a low response time, you're looking a physical layer issue anywhere from your PC to your ISP connection. At that point, you'll have to define the scope of the issue (where it starts and ends) via a "divide and conquer" approach of troubleshooting.

Look for a utility called UOTrace. It's an old one, but works well. Ping Plotter is another good too.

Edit: Link to UOTrace below. Once open, go to Option and then Advanced.

https://eaassets-a.akamaihd.net/eahelp/documents/uotrace.exe
 
Are you familiar with what services are running on your router?

Intrusion detection systems like Snort block packets based on large rule sets.
It blocks anything encrypted by default. If someone enabled this, but isn't managing rules a lot of things won't work.

QoS might be setup incorrectly and throttling certain traffic. Most downloads and websites are TCP from 80 so that wouldn't really explain it.

Check your bufferbloat on DSLreports. You might be maxing your down or up. Both impact downloads due to how TCP works.
 

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