Question Computer doesn’t go to sleep correctly and has trouble starting up

Jan 14, 2021
10
0
10
0
I keep having an issue where my computer keeps having trouble starting up or sleeping. Also it has this problem when I have to restart it occasionally. I’m thinking of getting a replacement power supply soon. If it helps reliability history says I have a hardware error that says “livekernelevent code 144”.

my specs:

Xfx rx580
X470 msi
Amd ryzen 5 3600
2 2tb hdd
16gb ram
Ubit WiFi 6 card
Evga 600w bronze psu
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Yes, replace that PSU, because all of the 600w bronze EVGA power supplies are fairly low quality to begin with. None of those are good quality like the older G2, G3, B2, P2, T2 and GQ units were. So that isn't the worst idea ever, but, it may not be the problem.

Are you running Windows 10?
 
Jan 14, 2021
10
0
10
0
Yes, replace that PSU, because all of the 600w bronze EVGA power supplies are fairly low quality to begin with. None of those are good quality like the older G2, G3, B2, P2, T2 and GQ units were. So that isn't the worst idea ever, but, it may not be the problem.

Are you running Windows 10?
Yes I’m running windows 10. I’ve tried reinstalling it multiple times and disabling fast startup.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Go into the BIOS and configure all of the following settings like you see here:

Cool N Quiet - Enabled (If this setting is not available in your BIOS, just worry about the rest)

Core CPPC - Enabled

CPPC preferred cores - Enabled

Advanced/Global C-states - Enabled

Precision boost overdrive (PBO/PBO2) - Disabled (Unless you have high end aftermarket cooling installed. Also, standard boost profiles like Precision boost (Non-overdrive) and XFR2 should be left enabled.)


Then, in Windows, disable hibernation. Just disabling fast restart is not enough. You have to FULLY disable the entire hybrid sleep and hibernation protocols, IF it is a configuration problem. So try this.

To disable Hibernation:

The first step is to run the command prompt as administrator. In Windows 10, you can do this by right clicking on the start menu and clicking "Command Prompt (Admin)"
Type in "powercfg.exe /h off" without the quotes and press enter. If you typed it in correctly, the cursor will simply start at a new line asking for new input
Now just exit out of command prompt


And if doing all of that doesn't solve the problem, try doing the following as well.

If there are any steps listed here that you have not already done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.



First,

Make sure your motherboard has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release.


Second,

Go to the product page for your motherboard on the manufacturer website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, storage controllers, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates. When it comes to the chipset drivers, if your motherboard manufacturer lists a chipset driver that is newer than what the chipset developer (Intel or AMD, for our purposes) lists, then use that one. If Intel (Or AMD) shows a chipset driver version that is newer than what is available from the motherboard product page, then use that one. Always use the newest chipset driver that you can get and always use ONLY the chipset drivers available from either the motherboard manufacturer, AMD or Intel.


IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.
 
Jan 14, 2021
10
0
10
0
Go into the BIOS and configure all of the following settings like you see here:

Cool N Quiet - Enabled (If this setting is not available in your BIOS, just worry about the rest)

Core CPPC - Enabled

CPPC preferred cores - Enabled

Advanced/Global C-states - Enabled

Precision boost overdrive (PBO/PBO2) - Disabled (Unless you have high end aftermarket cooling installed. Also, standard boost profiles like Precision boost (Non-overdrive) and XFR2 should be left enabled.)


Then, in Windows, disable hibernation. Just disabling fast restart is not enough. You have to FULLY disable the entire hybrid sleep and hibernation protocols, IF it is a configuration problem. So try this.

To disable Hibernation:

The first step is to run the command prompt as administrator. In Windows 10, you can do this by right clicking on the start menu and clicking "Command Prompt (Admin)"
Type in "powercfg.exe /h off" without the quotes and press enter. If you typed it in correctly, the cursor will simply start at a new line asking for new input
Now just exit out of command prompt


And if doing all of that doesn't solve the problem, try doing the following as well.

If there are any steps listed here that you have not already done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.



First,

Make sure your motherboard has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release.


Second,

Go to the product page for your motherboard on the manufacturer website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, storage controllers, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates. When it comes to the chipset drivers, if your motherboard manufacturer lists a chipset driver that is newer than what the chipset developer (Intel or AMD, for our purposes) lists, then use that one. If Intel (Or AMD) shows a chipset driver version that is newer than what is available from the motherboard product page, then use that one. Always use the newest chipset driver that you can get and always use ONLY the chipset drivers available from either the motherboard manufacturer, AMD or Intel.


IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.
I’ll try all that stuff if the power supply replacement doesn’t work. It could be the motherboard bios so I’ll try that first.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS