Question Computer freeze up

Feb 12, 2019
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We are using a Dell XPS 8700 Desktop Computer running on Windows 10 Pro. It has 24 GB Ram, Intel Core i7-4790 Processor CPU @ 3.60Hz, 64 Bit OS. Video Card is a GeFOrce GTX 750. We use this computer in a church with Easy Worship Presentation Software and are running 2 In Focus 124 A Projectors with VGA Hook-up through an Altinex DA1907LX Booster/Splitter. After startup and opening Easy Worship 20 to 30 Minutes everything freezes up. We have to manually shut off and re-boot. I know the VGA cables are 100 foot cables. What might be the problem and solution to our problem? I have checked with In-Focus, Easy Worship, and Dell and they have all given me the run around i.e., check with Dell, or check with In Focus. You get the picture. Please help!!
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
On the Dell XPS 8700 open Reliability History/Manager or Event Viewer.

Look for error codes, warnings, or even informational events that occur just before or at the time of the freeze ups.

What PSU is installed in the Dell? Make, model, wattage, age, condition?
 
Feb 12, 2019
5
0
10
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On the Dell XPS 8700 open Reliability History/Manager or Event Viewer.

Look for error codes, warnings, or even informational events that occur just before or at the time of the freeze ups.

What PSU is installed in the Dell? Make, model, wattage, age, condition?
I am a novice at this stuff. How do I go about and find the Reliability/History Manager Event Viewer?
As for the PSU, I take that that is the Power Supply Unit? I will have to open it up and look at that. I will get back to you. It may be a day or two as I work 3 jobs.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Windows 10 - just type Reliability History or Event Viewer into the "Type here to search" box.

PSU is Power Supply Unit. You should be able to see the basic PSU information (make, model, wattage) on the outside labling.

Only, if necessary, open the desktop case. Do not attempt to take the PSU apart.

Be sure to power off and unplug the desktop before looking inside.
 
Feb 12, 2019
5
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10
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Windows 10 - just type Reliability History or Event Viewer into the "Type here to search" box.

PSU is Power Supply Unit. You should be able to see the basic PSU information (make, model, wattage) on the outside labling.

Only, if necessary, open the desktop case. Do not attempt to take the PSU apart.

Be sure to power off and unplug the desktop before looking inside.
Thanks for your help
 
Feb 12, 2019
5
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Thanks for your help
Windows 10 - just type Reliability History or Event Viewer into the "Type here to search" box.

PSU is Power Supply Unit. You should be able to see the basic PSU information (make, model, wattage) on the outside labling.

Only, if necessary, open the desktop case. Do not attempt to take the PSU apart.

Be sure to power off and unplug the desktop before looking inside.
Here is what I have found out so far. Haven't had a chance to check PSU, but I did look at event log and here is the information I found: 2 items 1 critical and the other an error

Log Name: System
Source: Microsoft-Windows-Kernel-Power
Date: 12/10/2018 3:01:49 PM
Event ID: 41
Task Category: (63)
Level: Critical
Keywords: SQM,WDI Diag
User: SYSTEM
Computer: granbybc-PC
Description:
The system has rebooted without cleanly shutting down first. This error could be caused if the system stopped responding, crashed, or lost power unexpectedly.
Event Xml:
<Event xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/win/2004/08/events/event">
<System>
<Provider Name="Microsoft-Windows-Kernel-Power" Guid="{331c3b3a-2005-44c2-ac5e-77220c37d6b4}" />
<EventID>41</EventID>
<Version>6</Version>
<Level>1</Level>
<Task>63</Task>
<Opcode>0</Opcode>
<Keywords>0x8000400000000002</Keywords>
<TimeCreated SystemTime="2018-12-10T22:01:49.229248600Z" />
<EventRecordID>1047</EventRecordID>
<Correlation />
<Execution ProcessID="4" ThreadID="8" />
<Channel>System</Channel>
<Computer>granbybc-PC</Computer>
<Security UserID="S-1-5-18" />
</System>
<EventData>
<Data Name="BugcheckCode">0</Data>
<Data Name="BugcheckParameter1">0x0</Data>

Log Name: System
Source: Microsoft-Windows-Kernel-Boot
Date: 12/10/2018 3:01:39 PM
Event ID: 29
Task Category: None
Level: Error
Keywords: Warning
User: SYSTEM
Computer: granbybc-PC
Description:
Windows failed fast startup with error status 0xC00000D4.
Event Xml:
<Event xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/win/2004/08/events/event">
<System>
<Provider Name="Microsoft-Windows-Kernel-Boot" Guid="{15ca44ff-4d7a-4baa-bba5-0998955e531e}" />
<EventID>29</EventID>
<Version>1</Version>
<Level>2</Level>
<Task>0</Task>
<Opcode>0</Opcode>
<Keywords>0x8000080000000000</Keywords>
<TimeCreated SystemTime="2018-12-10T22:01:39.762354200Z" />
<EventRecordID>1027</EventRecordID>
<Correlation />
<Execution ProcessID="4" ThreadID="8" />
<Channel>System</Channel>
<Computer>granbybc-PC</Computer>
<Security UserID="S-1-5-18" />
</System>
<EventData>
<Data Name="FailureStatus">3221225684</Data>
<Data Name="FailureMsg">A fatal error occurred processing the restoration data.
</Data>
</EventData>
</Event>

I don't know if any of this makes sense to you. It is all 'greek' to me. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
<Data Name="BugcheckParameter2">0x0</Data>
<Data Name="BugcheckParameter3">0x0</Data>
<Data Name="BugcheckParameter4">0x0</Data>
<Data Name="SleepInProgress">6</Data>
<Data Name="PowerButtonTimestamp">0</Data>
<Data Name="BootAppStatus">3221225684</Data>
<Data Name="Checkpoint">9</Data>
<Data Name="ConnectedStandbyInProgress">false</Data>
<Data Name="SystemSleepTransitionsToOn">3</Data>
<Data Name="CsEntryScenarioInstanceId">0</Data>
<Data Name="BugcheckInfoFromEFI">false</Data>
<Data Name="CheckpointStatus">0</Data>
</EventData>
</Event>
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Leaning towards a PSU problem.

PSU problems tend to create and cause any number of issues.

Start with that. Just identifying the PSU: make, model, wattage, age, and condition will be helpful.

Event Viewer is indeed a lot of "greek" sometimes....

Fortunately, someone else following this thread may spot a specific cause via the logs and offer additional suggestions and comments. Fine with me.
 
Feb 12, 2019
5
0
10
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Leaning towards a PSU problem.

PSU problems tend to create and cause any number of issues.

Start with that. Just identifying the PSU: make, model, wattage, age, and condition will be helpful.

Event Viewer is indeed a lot of "greek" sometimes....

Fortunately, someone else following this thread may spot a specific cause via the logs and offer additional suggestions and comments. Fine with me.
Here is the info on the my Dell XPS 8700 PSU

Input = 100-240v - /8a 50-60Hz
Max Power = 460W
Max Power Combined Power on = +5v & 3.3V Output is 142W
Max Power Combined Power On = 12VA + 12VB + 12VC Output is 385 W
Model Number is D460AM-02

Hope this makes sense
 

jamesanyoung

Honorable
Aug 26, 2013
216
6
10,715
5
Have you made sure you are running all the latest drivers for those programs, and that your OS is up to date?
You may also want to download CoreTEMP to see if your CPU is getting too hot.

You could also check how many background or startup programs are running and eating up RAM and CPU power.
 

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