[SOLVED] Computer Freezes when Stressed

Dec 7, 2019
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My computer used to have cooling issues, which would cause it to automatically shut down. I replaced the fan based system with a water cooler and the temps dropped drastically, as expected. However, now my computer simply freezes during games or intensive software like game development (Unreal). Temps have stayed low, all my specs should be plenty sufficient (listed below). Stress tests indicate my GPU is fine, and 2x4 GB DDR3 ram is listed as sufficient for these programs. My last thought is power supply, which is 500W but is my last resort. Any thoughts?

CPU: AMD Athlon X4 860K
Motherboard: Gigabyte Micro-ATX FM2+
Ram: 2x4GB DDR3
SSD/HDD: SSD 1TB WD Blue
GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 960
PSU: 500W EVGA (approx. 4 years old)
Chassis: Thermaltake Versa H22
OS: Windows 10
 
If you're not finding any values out of place with HWinfo I'm not sure what else to say. There's always a chance of it being a driver issue with your video card. You could roll back to an earlier driver to see if that helps before spending money on a PSU. Reviews of your PSU are a mixed bag of people saying it works fine and others saying it's junk. I recommend better quality PSU's since it's critical to any computer.
 
Download and install HWinfo for windows. This is a great freeware tool to help diagnose problems. Run the program, check the box 'sensors only' and minimize it to your taskbar and let it run. Don't close the program. Play a game for a few minutes but not long enough to encounter the freeze you mentioned. Exit the game and maximize HWinfo. Look at max values for CPU core temps to see if you're H55 is working properly. Look for critical temps and throttling to see if that is occuring. Look at motherboard values for +12volt to see if the power supply is doing its job. You can also see CPU and case fan values. Same thing for GPU look at performance values to see if its hitting thermal limits or if the fan isn't working. There's tons of values to look at with this program so you'll need to spend some time with it and get to know it. Look for things throughout the tables that are obvious signs of a problem. Let us know what you find. Another thing to consider is the electricity delived to your home. Is it stable? Are power drops and outages common where you live? Lastly, the power supply you're using is not very good quality and there's a good chance it's causing the problem. Hopefully some of the other guys here will add to what I've said to help some more.
 
Dec 7, 2019
7
0
10
0
Download and install HWinfo for windows. This is a great freeware tool to help diagnose problems. Run the program, check the box 'sensors only' and minimize it to your taskbar and let it run. Don't close the program. Play a game for a few minutes but not long enough to encounter the freeze you mentioned. Exit the game and maximize HWinfo. Look at max values for CPU core temps to see if you're H55 is working properly. Look for critical temps and throttling to see if that is occuring. Look at motherboard values for +12volt to see if the power supply is doing its job. You can also see CPU and case fan values. Same thing for GPU look at performance values to see if its hitting thermal limits or if the fan isn't working. There's tons of values to look at with this program so you'll need to spend some time with it and get to know it. Look for things throughout the tables that are obvious signs of a problem. Let us know what you find. Another thing to consider is the electricity delived to your home. Is it stable? Are power drops and outages common where you live? Lastly, the power supply you're using is not very good quality and there's a good chance it's causing the problem. Hopefully some of the other guys here will add to what I've said to help some more.
I’ve actually used HWinfo to try and diagnose! I’ve run it alongside various games/intensive programs and gone back and forth. The temps stay consistently low (GPU gets higher but well within expected ranges), the voltages don’t vary hardly at all, notably the 12V. The electricity coming in has actually been quite stable, I don’t think I’ve had any outages in a year+ I’ve been living here, but I’ve still considered a UPS. Sounds like I’ll be replacing the PSU and seeing if it helps?
 
Dec 7, 2019
7
0
10
0
If you're not finding any values out of place with HWinfo I'm not sure what else to say. There's always a chance of it being a driver issue with your video card. Reviews of your PSU are a mixed bag of people saying it works fine and others saying it's junk. I recommend better quality PSU's since it's critical to any computer.
I’ve checked the drivers and updated it after too, but there’s a slight chance I need to return to a previous driver. But ok! It is a 4 year old PSU and not Bronze 80+, so it seems like a good place to go. Thank you!
 

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