[SOLVED] Computer gets insanely hot when gaming

Mar 23, 2022
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This is an issue that really has been eating away at me for the past year: my computer's physical tempature when gaming.

I purchased a pre-built last year (didn't want to, but finding high-end parts was impossible). The computer is great, link: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08J8D5RN6/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

The only issue is that it gets infernally hot when gaming.

I'm not a tech guy, reading internal temps is new to me: here's a snapshot of my HWMonitor.

View: https://i.imgur.com/UCu2UFT.png

View: https://i.imgur.com/E5AI7xj.png


These are the readings when my computer is the hottest (when playing Elden Ring). I play in mostly 4k resolution if that means anything.

During the summer, without the AC, my room temp rose from 70 degrees to 91 degrees F. It was agonizing, and I can't imagine this is the norm with new computers these days.

I honestly just don't want to go through another summer sweating in my computer chair when I want to play a game. I know the computer has a cooling system inside of it, but I just don't see how this could be right. It's very, very hot when you place your hand on the side of the computer. Like, alarmingly hot. Yet, no issues with freezing or overheating/crashing apparently.

Can anyone help me understand what's happening?
Thanks.
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
Use hwinfo for your 5950X from now on, not hw monitor.
Monitor the 'CPU(Tctl/Tdie)' sensor.

During the summer, without the AC, my room temp rose from 70 degrees to 91 degrees F. It was agonizing, and I can't imagine this is the norm with new computers these days.

I honestly just don't want to go through another summer sweating in my computer chair when I want to play a game. I know the computer has a cooling system inside of it, but I just don't see how this could be right.
This happens from total system power consumption, not the hardwares' operating temperature.
The likes of 80C is nothing to semiconductors and silicon.

Also, Ampere sucks... power. A PC is basically a space heater, with the gpu typically being the biggest heating element inside by far.
During gaming sessions, if for some reason A/C isn't available/usable, or you don't direct the heat from the PC to go immediately out of your room, then your room is going to get hot... and liquid cooling does not fix/stop this.
With some parts, it's worse: Operating temperatures go down, but power consumption stays the same. Also, both Ryzen 5000 and RTX 30 will pursue higher performance - to a point - thanks to the lower temperatures, so power use will actually be a little higher.
 
This is an issue that really has been eating away at me for the past year: my computer's physical tempature when gaming.

I purchased a pre-built last year (didn't want to, but finding high-end parts was impossible). The computer is great, link: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08J8D5RN6/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

The only issue is that it gets infernally hot when gaming.

I'm not a tech guy, reading internal temps is new to me: here's a snapshot of my HWMonitor.

View: https://i.imgur.com/UCu2UFT.png

View: https://i.imgur.com/E5AI7xj.png


These are the readings when my computer is the hottest (when playing Elden Ring). I play in mostly 4k resolution if that means anything.

During the summer, without the AC, my room temp rose from 70 degrees to 91 degrees F. It was agonizing, and I can't imagine this is the norm with new computers these days.

I honestly just don't want to go through another summer sweating in my computer chair when I want to play a game. I know the computer has a cooling system inside of it, but I just don't see how this could be right. It's very, very hot when you place your hand on the side of the computer. Like, alarmingly hot. Yet, no issues with freezing or overheating/crashing apparently.

Can anyone help me understand what's happening?
Thanks.
It's a hot CPU but it's made like that. On that chart I can see only one core reaching for throttling limit. that's probably one core that gets loaded most which happens with single core optimized games and apps..
That CPU cooler may not be good enough having only 3 heat pipes but the case despite having all those fans looks pretty restrictive to air flow. I would try to run without side panel or even better with front mask removed.
Another reason I don't like prebuilt PCs, they always cheap out on some components.
 
Mar 23, 2022
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Obstructed air intake. Your pc doesn't get enough fresh air in.
Try running game with front panel removed. Also you may want to turn off one of top fans (closer to front).

Then consider getting a better pc case - with mesh front.
Can you recommend the best case for air flow? Money isn't an issue, I like buying the best I can. Thanks.

And, why do you recommend turning off the top fan? Wouldn't that create even less air flow?
 
Can you recommend the best case for air flow? Money isn't an issue, I like buying the best I can.
Something from Fractal design meshify series.
Meshify C mini

or something from Cooler Master with mesh front
Cooler Master TD500 Mesh

There are a lot of options. It depends more on personal aesthetic preference.
 
Mar 23, 2022
7
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10
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Something from Fractal design meshify series.
Meshify C mini

or something from Cooler Master with mesh front
Cooler Master TD500 Mesh

There are a lot of options. It depends more on personal aesthetic preference.
Okay, last question. Do you think the Cooler Master setup it came with is sufficient? I watched
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZnDESqJdyU
just now and its the first time ive seen a water cooled system. Is this a better set up, or do you just recommend the case for now?
Thanks
 
Mar 23, 2022
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I wouldn't recommend watercooling.
Loads of possible issues - leaks, clogging of cpu block, corrosion, bio growth in coolant, e.t.c.
Too messy for my taste.
I see. Lastly, does my GPU need cooling based off the temps I linked? I noticed it doesn't have any when I opened my case up just now
 
Your pc case currently is the most significant limiting factor for a good cooling.

Other than that ...
remove case front panel,​
remove case side panel,​
lower ambient temperature in your room (open window if you live in cold climate or turn on your AC unit).​
 
Okay, last question. Do you think the Cooler Master setup it came with is sufficient? I watched
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZnDESqJdyU
just now and its the first time ive seen a water cooled system. Is this a better set up, or do you just recommend the case for now?
Thanks
Water cooling works great. Low temps while being extremely quiet. They are a little work to get set up, but once going can go for quite some time before any maintenance is required.
 
Mar 23, 2022
7
0
10
0
Water cooling works great. Low temps while being extremely quiet. They are a little work to get set up, but once going can go for quite some time before any maintenance is required.
What would you recommend product wise right now? I'd love to get my GPU and CPU watercooled, but I'd need a step-by-step tutorial like this video I linked. Thnx in advance.
 
What would you recommend product wise right now? I'd love to get my GPU and CPU watercooled, but I'd need a step-by-step tutorial like this video I linked. Thnx in advance.
I went the easy route and just configured a setup through Corsairs website. Far from the best quality parts available, but they've worked flawlessly. Your biggest problem will be finding a water block for that GPU.
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
Use hwinfo for your 5950X from now on, not hw monitor.
Monitor the 'CPU(Tctl/Tdie)' sensor.

During the summer, without the AC, my room temp rose from 70 degrees to 91 degrees F. It was agonizing, and I can't imagine this is the norm with new computers these days.

I honestly just don't want to go through another summer sweating in my computer chair when I want to play a game. I know the computer has a cooling system inside of it, but I just don't see how this could be right.
This happens from total system power consumption, not the hardwares' operating temperature.
The likes of 80C is nothing to semiconductors and silicon.

Also, Ampere sucks... power. A PC is basically a space heater, with the gpu typically being the biggest heating element inside by far.
During gaming sessions, if for some reason A/C isn't available/usable, or you don't direct the heat from the PC to go immediately out of your room, then your room is going to get hot... and liquid cooling does not fix/stop this.
With some parts, it's worse: Operating temperatures go down, but power consumption stays the same. Also, both Ryzen 5000 and RTX 30 will pursue higher performance - to a point - thanks to the lower temperatures, so power use will actually be a little higher.
 

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