Question Computer not booting after new GPU

Nov 9, 2019
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Hi everyone,
So recently I bought a new gpu to replace my old one. The new one I got was a Asus Rog Strx 1650. Now I’m running into the problem that it doesn’t boot. I have a prebuilt Dell XPS 8300 I5-2400. Everytime I turn it on I get one beep and I have no idea why that’s the case. There’s just continuations of one short beep every couple of seconds. When I boot I see the Dell logo but I am unable to go to BIOS or any other computer function.
 

LWFG001

Commendable
Apr 12, 2017
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On a Dell computer: the delay between each beep is 300ms, the delay between each set of beeps is 3 seconds, and the beep sound lasts 300ms. Factor this and then tell us how many beeps there are between "each set of beeps" which is 3 seconds.

If it is actually 1 repetitive beep, then it is a motherboard issue. Specifically, a BIOS ROM checksum failure. See: https://www.dell.com/support/article/us/en/04/sln293445/understanding-beep-codes-on-a-dell-desktop-pc?lang=en

The next step would be to replace your old graphics card and see if the computer boots up like it used to before you installed the new graphics card.

If not, and the problem persists, then it likely is a motherboard issue. So you would run Dell Diagnostics: https://www.dell.com/support/article/us/en/04/sln293445/understanding-beep-codes-on-a-dell-desktop-pc?lang=en

Hopefully, the old graphics card works with the computer giving you time to figure out why the new graphics card is causing the problem. Otherwise, well... motherboard issue.
 
Nov 9, 2019
7
0
10
0
On a Dell computer: the delay between each beep is 300ms, the delay between each set of beeps is 3 seconds, and the beep sound lasts 300ms. Factor this and then tell us how many beeps there are between "each set of beeps" which is 3 seconds.

If it is actually 1 repetitive beep, then it is a motherboard issue. Specifically, a BIOS ROM checksum failure. See: https://www.dell.com/support/article/us/en/04/sln293445/understanding-beep-codes-on-a-dell-desktop-pc?lang=en

The next step would be to replace your old graphics card and see if the computer boots up like it used to before you installed the new graphics card.

If not, and the problem persists, then it likely is a motherboard issue. So you would run Dell Diagnostics: https://www.dell.com/support/article/us/en/04/sln293445/understanding-beep-codes-on-a-dell-desktop-pc?lang=en

Hopefully, the old graphics card works with the computer giving you time to figure out why the new graphics card is causing the problem. Otherwise, well... motherboard issue.
Yea I have already tried to boot with my old graphics card and everything still works. Having a hard time figuring out why the new one isn’t working properly.
 

LWFG001

Commendable
Apr 12, 2017
143
8
1,595
4
Yea I have already tried to boot with my old graphics card and everything still works. Having a hard time figuring out why the new one isn’t working properly.
That's good! Means that your motherboard appears to be fine.

Here's the service manual for Dell XPS 8300: https://downloads.dell.com/manuals/all-products/esuprt_desktop/esuprt_xps_desktop/xps-8300_service manual_en-us.pdf

On page 10 is the system motherboard layout. Number 25 is the PCI Express x16 card slot (PCI-EX16_1) and I assume you're plugging the ROG-STRIX-GTX1650-O4G-GAMING video card into that slot right? Because that's where it's supposed to go.

Your video card is a PCI express 3.0 card but the motherboard slot for it is a PCI express 16 2.0 slot which means the video card won't operate at it's best speed nor use its highest resolutions BUT it should fit in the motherboard and work fine (other than that).

So, I think the next step is to see how many watts the power supply on that Dell XPS 8300 has. Go here and type in your service tag and find out how many watts your power supply has: https://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/04

Because if the computer's devices are pulling more power than the Dell XPS 8300's power supply can provide, what you're describing does happen. It's very common to see someone buy a new gaming video card and have these problems because their computer's power supply is too weak to handle the new video card's power requirements.

In fact, it's time to figure out how many watts your power supply has. How many watts does your Dell XPS 8300 power supply have?
 
Nov 9, 2019
7
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10
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That's good! Means that your motherboard appears to be fine.

Here's the service manual for Dell XPS 8300: https://downloads.dell.com/manuals/all-products/esuprt_desktop/esuprt_xps_desktop/xps-8300_service manual_en-us.pdf

On page 10 is the system motherboard layout. Number 25 is the PCI Express x16 card slot (PCI-EX16_1) and I assume you're plugging the ROG-STRIX-GTX1650-O4G-GAMING video card into that slot right? Because that's where it's supposed to go.

Your video card is a PCI express 3.0 card but the motherboard slot for it is a PCI express 16 2.0 slot which means the video card won't operate at it's best speed nor use its highest resolutions BUT it should fit in the motherboard and work fine (other than that).

So, I think the next step is to see how many watts the power supply on that Dell XPS 8300 has. Go here and type in your service tag and find out how many watts your power supply has: https://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/04

Because if the computer's devices are pulling more power than the Dell XPS 8300's power supply can provide, what you're describing does happen. It's very common to see someone buy a new gaming video card and have these problems because their computer's power supply is too weak to handle the new video card's power requirements.

In fact, it's time to figure out how many watts your power supply has. How many watts does your Dell XPS 8300 power supply have?
My power supply is the OEM one the computer came with it’s a 460W
 

LWFG001

Commendable
Apr 12, 2017
143
8
1,595
4
Ok, you should have enough watts with your existing power supply to drive that. So, it must be something else.

It's always great to nail the problem right away but the sad truth is that troubleshooting often is about isolating the problem in order to fix it in which an intelligent process of elimination is required.

The two most likely reasons are that the new video card is defective (unlikely) or the one repetitive beep is telling us that your computer's motherboard isn't accepting your new video card (likely).

What I found is the second reason is the right one. Others have had the same exact problem with Dell XPS 8300 and Dell XPS 8500 running Windows 8 and Windows 10. This Dell post explains the problem: https://www.dell.com/community/Desktops-General-Read-Only/XPS-8500-video-card-power-supply-upgrades/m-p/4000285

And this: https://www.dell.com/community/Desktops-General-Read-Only/Dell-XPS-8300-Video-Card-Upgrade-Issues/td-p/3880741

The problem is on the Dell XPS 8300 and 8500, Dell removed the ability to disable onboard video from the system BIOS instead having the motherboard detect whether or not the card in the PCI-express x16 slot is a video card or not. What's happening is the BIOS isn't detecting your new video card in the slot. Some cards the motherboard BIOS detects, others it does not.

There may be a workaround, but first what exactly is the old video card that works with the computer?
 

dotas1

Reputable
Dec 5, 2015
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The issue is either BIOS or PSU. For BIOS you will need to upgrade to the latest. Is it UEFI or legacy?

Prebuilts have crappy PSUs that will deliver just what the hardware that was originally in the case when bought. If you also factor the age degradation, you see that is the culprit.

The 12V rail is what matters in a PC and I bet that OP's PSU does not have 460 wattage on the 12v rail. If possible take a picture of the PSU where the sticker is, upload it to imgur and share it here.
 
Nov 9, 2019
7
0
10
0
Ok, you should have enough watts with your existing power supply to drive that. So, it must be something else.

It's always great to nail the problem right away but the sad truth is that troubleshooting often is about isolating the problem in order to fix it in which an intelligent process of elimination is required.

The two most likely reasons are that the new video card is defective (unlikely) or the one repetitive beep is telling us that your computer's motherboard isn't accepting your new video card (likely).

What I found is the second reason is the right one. Others have had the same exact problem with Dell XPS 8300 and Dell XPS 8500 running Windows 8 and Windows 10. This Dell post explains the problem: https://www.dell.com/community/Desktops-General-Read-Only/XPS-8500-video-card-power-supply-upgrades/m-p/4000285

And this: https://www.dell.com/community/Desktops-General-Read-Only/Dell-XPS-8300-Video-Card-Upgrade-Issues/td-p/3880741

The problem is on the Dell XPS 8300 and 8500, Dell removed the ability to disable onboard video from the system BIOS instead having the motherboard detect whether or not the card in the PCI-express x16 slot is a video card or not. What's happening is the BIOS isn't detecting your new video card in the slot. Some cards the motherboard BIOS detects, others it does not.

There may be a workaround, but first what exactly is the old video card that works with the computer?
The card that came with the computer was a Radeon 5450. later I replaced it with EVGA 750TI which I currently use. Now I am trying to upgrade to the 1650 that is getting rejected by my computer.
The issue is either BIOS or PSU. For BIOS you will need to upgrade to the latest. Is it UEFI or legacy?

Prebuilts have crappy PSUs that will deliver just what the hardware that was originally in the case when bought. If you also factor the age degradation, you see that is the culprit.

The 12V rail is what matters in a PC and I bet that OP's PSU does not have 460 wattage on the 12v rail. If possible take a picture of the PSU where the sticker is, upload it to imgur and share it here.
I have the model number of my power supply: ac460ad-00 .
 
Nov 9, 2019
7
0
10
0
The issue is either BIOS or PSU. For BIOS you will need to upgrade to the latest. Is it UEFI or legacy?

Prebuilts have crappy PSUs that will deliver just what the hardware that was originally in the case when bought. If you also factor the age degradation, you see that is the culprit.

The 12V rail is what matters in a PC and I bet that OP's PSU does not have 460 wattage on the 12v rail. If possible take a picture of the PSU where the sticker is, upload it to imgur and share it here.
Sorry, I never answered the other part of your question. I have the latest bios which is A06. It is also Legacy doesn't give me an option to change to UEFI I don't think my bios allows that.
 

dotas1

Reputable
Dec 5, 2015
1,241
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Modern GPUs require UEFI BIOS in order to work. If you Google a bit about it you will see that it comes down to manufacturers and motherboard compatibility. At least that's what i understood.

The PSU should be changed nevertheless. Its the heart of your pc and you should have a reliable heart, not a trashy one.
 

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