Computer power failure

G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hello all -

I'm posting this in 2 groups because I'm not sure where it should go. I
apologize in advance.

I'm having a power failure problem with my computer. It can be on for up to
30 min and then it'll power off by itself. I'll let it sit for about 5
minutes and when I go to turn it back on, nothing happens. I have to unplug
the power cord from the power supply and power it back on that way. I've
run a couple of system utilities program and they didn't detect any
problems. I've also checked the device manager and there are no yellow
question or exclamation marks and no red Xs. This has been happening for a
while now.

My computer specs are: Compaq Presario 6320 w/WinXP Home, AMD Athlon XP
2000+ processor (1.67ghz), 768mb ram, 60gb hard drive, cdrw and DVD rom
drives.

Does anyone know what could be causing this to happen and how do I fix it?
Could it be a faulty power supply? Please help. All replies and
suggestions will be appreciated.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hi

What size power supply have you got?

--

Will Denny
MS-MVP - Windows Shell/User
Please reply to the News Groups


"newtechie" <wgrant49@somedomain.com> wrote in message
news:O1f$BaOzEHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Hello all -
>
> I'm posting this in 2 groups because I'm not sure where it should go. I
> apologize in advance.
>
> I'm having a power failure problem with my computer. It can be on for up
> to
> 30 min and then it'll power off by itself. I'll let it sit for about 5
> minutes and when I go to turn it back on, nothing happens. I have to
> unplug
> the power cord from the power supply and power it back on that way. I've
> run a couple of system utilities program and they didn't detect any
> problems. I've also checked the device manager and there are no yellow
> question or exclamation marks and no red Xs. This has been happening for
> a
> while now.
>
> My computer specs are: Compaq Presario 6320 w/WinXP Home, AMD Athlon XP
> 2000+ processor (1.67ghz), 768mb ram, 60gb hard drive, cdrw and DVD rom
> drives.
>
> Does anyone know what could be causing this to happen and how do I fix it?
> Could it be a faulty power supply? Please help. All replies and
> suggestions will be appreciated.
>
>
>
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

It's a 200W

"Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
news:uARkKcOzEHA.2656@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Hi
>
> What size power supply have you got?
>
> --
>
> Will Denny
> MS-MVP - Windows Shell/User
> Please reply to the News Groups
>
>
> "newtechie" <wgrant49@somedomain.com> wrote in message
> news:O1f$BaOzEHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > Hello all -
> >
> > I'm posting this in 2 groups because I'm not sure where it should go. I
> > apologize in advance.
> >
> > I'm having a power failure problem with my computer. It can be on for
up
> > to
> > 30 min and then it'll power off by itself. I'll let it sit for about 5
> > minutes and when I go to turn it back on, nothing happens. I have to
> > unplug
> > the power cord from the power supply and power it back on that way.
I've
> > run a couple of system utilities program and they didn't detect any
> > problems. I've also checked the device manager and there are no yellow
> > question or exclamation marks and no red Xs. This has been happening
for
> > a
> > while now.
> >
> > My computer specs are: Compaq Presario 6320 w/WinXP Home, AMD Athlon XP
> > 2000+ processor (1.67ghz), 768mb ram, 60gb hard drive, cdrw and DVD rom
> > drives.
> >
> > Does anyone know what could be causing this to happen and how do I fix
it?
> > Could it be a faulty power supply? Please help. All replies and
> > suggestions will be appreciated.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Your PSU is far too low for the system.... I'd suggest at least 350w,
however your problem seems to be caused by overheating rather than a faulty
PSU.... although it could be the fan in the PSU.

When it next comes on, check ALL fans in the PC, especially the one on the
CPU and the one in the PSU.
--
Cari (MS-MVP) Windows Client - Printing/Imaging and Hardware
www.coribright.com

"newtechie" <wgrant49@somedomain.com> wrote in message
news:uYNTEkOzEHA.1264@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> It's a 200W
>
> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
> news:uARkKcOzEHA.2656@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> Hi
>>
>> What size power supply have you got?
>>
>> --
>>
>> Will Denny
>> MS-MVP - Windows Shell/User
>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>
>>
>> "newtechie" <wgrant49@somedomain.com> wrote in message
>> news:O1f$BaOzEHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> > Hello all -
>> >
>> > I'm posting this in 2 groups because I'm not sure where it should go.
>> > I
>> > apologize in advance.
>> >
>> > I'm having a power failure problem with my computer. It can be on for
> up
>> > to
>> > 30 min and then it'll power off by itself. I'll let it sit for about 5
>> > minutes and when I go to turn it back on, nothing happens. I have to
>> > unplug
>> > the power cord from the power supply and power it back on that way.
> I've
>> > run a couple of system utilities program and they didn't detect any
>> > problems. I've also checked the device manager and there are no yellow
>> > question or exclamation marks and no red Xs. This has been happening
> for
>> > a
>> > while now.
>> >
>> > My computer specs are: Compaq Presario 6320 w/WinXP Home, AMD Athlon
>> > XP
>> > 2000+ processor (1.67ghz), 768mb ram, 60gb hard drive, cdrw and DVD rom
>> > drives.
>> >
>> > Does anyone know what could be causing this to happen and how do I fix
> it?
>> > Could it be a faulty power supply? Please help. All replies and
>> > suggestions will be appreciated.
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hi Cari,

Thanks so much for your reply. I'm unsure why the fan is not coming on if
overheating is the cause.
The fan on the CPU sounds and looks normal. I might just have to buy
another power supply.

Newtechie


"Cari (MS-MVP)" <Newsgroups1@coribright.com> wrote in message
news:%23YXDqpOzEHA.3836@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Your PSU is far too low for the system.... I'd suggest at least 350w,
> however your problem seems to be caused by overheating rather than a
faulty
> PSU.... although it could be the fan in the PSU.
>
> When it next comes on, check ALL fans in the PC, especially the one on the
> CPU and the one in the PSU.
> --
> Cari (MS-MVP) Windows Client - Printing/Imaging and Hardware
> www.coribright.com
>
> "newtechie" <wgrant49@somedomain.com> wrote in message
> news:uYNTEkOzEHA.1264@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> > It's a 200W
> >
> > "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
> > news:uARkKcOzEHA.2656@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> >> Hi
> >>
> >> What size power supply have you got?
> >>
> >> --
> >>
> >> Will Denny
> >> MS-MVP - Windows Shell/User
> >> Please reply to the News Groups
> >>
> >>
> >> "newtechie" <wgrant49@somedomain.com> wrote in message
> >> news:O1f$BaOzEHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> >> > Hello all -
> >> >
> >> > I'm posting this in 2 groups because I'm not sure where it should go.
> >> > I
> >> > apologize in advance.
> >> >
> >> > I'm having a power failure problem with my computer. It can be on
for
> > up
> >> > to
> >> > 30 min and then it'll power off by itself. I'll let it sit for about
5
> >> > minutes and when I go to turn it back on, nothing happens. I have to
> >> > unplug
> >> > the power cord from the power supply and power it back on that way.
> > I've
> >> > run a couple of system utilities program and they didn't detect any
> >> > problems. I've also checked the device manager and there are no
yellow
> >> > question or exclamation marks and no red Xs. This has been happening
> > for
> >> > a
> >> > while now.
> >> >
> >> > My computer specs are: Compaq Presario 6320 w/WinXP Home, AMD Athlon
> >> > XP
> >> > 2000+ processor (1.67ghz), 768mb ram, 60gb hard drive, cdrw and DVD
rom
> >> > drives.
> >> >
> >> > Does anyone know what could be causing this to happen and how do I
fix
> > it?
> >> > Could it be a faulty power supply? Please help. All replies and
> >> > suggestions will be appreciated.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
> >
>
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Fans fail in time. Sometimes it's the bearings, sometimes the motors.
Sometimes who knows!

I run a 550w PSU (3 hard drives and a DVD burner).......I think the
'smallest' PSU in all my desktop PCs is a 425w in my husband's PC. Mine
also has 3 case fans but I'm running a Prescott. Hubby's PC has 2 case
fans - he's an AthlonXP 2200+. My Server has the same specs as hubby's but
a 500w PSU.
--
Cari (MS-MVP Windows Client - Printing, Imaging & Hardware)
www.coribright.com

"newtechie" <wgrant49@somedomain.com> wrote in message
news:eJ57$$OzEHA.3028@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Hi Cari,
>
> Thanks so much for your reply. I'm unsure why the fan is not coming on if
> overheating is the cause.
> The fan on the CPU sounds and looks normal. I might just have to buy
> another power supply.
>
> Newtechie
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Many brand name systems work just fine with a 250 watt
supply. 400 watts is well beyond what most everyone needs.
But then too many buy 'dumped' import supplies - making a
decision based only on price. The supply that is labeled 400
watts may only be 300 watts or less. So many computer
assemblers simply buy larger supplies rather than learn why
failures happen.

Discovering a power supply problem is quick and easy. Takes
but minutes and does not remove or change anything. No reason
to replace a supply unless it first is obviously a problem.
Procedure will probably take longer to read than it takes to
determine if power supply is really undersized:
"Computer doesnt start at all" in alt.comp.hardware on 10
Jan 2004 at
http://tinyurl.com/2t69q or
"I think my power supply is dead" in alt.comp.hardware on 5
Feb 2004 at http://www.tinyurl.com/2musa

In the meantime, what did system (event) logs report?

You symptoms can be created by a power supply controller
that is located on motherboard. Replacing the power supply
would not solve this problem. However heat is an excellent
diagnostic tool. Selectively heat motherboard sections and
other computer components with a hairdryer on high. That is a
normal operating temperature for all computer parts. A
properly working computer must work just fine in a room at
over 100 degree F. But intermittent components tend to fail
when heated. Heat is another diagnostic tool to locate a
defective part without wildly replacing anything.

Again, 400+ watt power supplies are well above what a
typical computer system requires. If power supply is too
small, that above procedure will identify the problem
immediately. And the event log says ...?

newtechie wrote:
> Thanks so much for your reply. I'm unsure why the fan is not coming
> on if overheating is the cause. The fan on the CPU sounds and looks
> normal. I might just have to buy another power supply.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hi

You really need a bigger power supply than that. Something in region of
400+ would be better.

--

Will Denny
MS-MVP - Windows Shell/User
Please reply to the News Groups


"newtechie" <wgrant49@somedomain.com> wrote in message
news:uYNTEkOzEHA.1264@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> It's a 200W
>
> "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
> news:uARkKcOzEHA.2656@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> Hi
>>
>> What size power supply have you got?
>>
>> --
>>
>> Will Denny
>> MS-MVP - Windows Shell/User
>> Please reply to the News Groups
>>
>>
>> "newtechie" <wgrant49@somedomain.com> wrote in message
>> news:O1f$BaOzEHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> > Hello all -
>> >
>> > I'm posting this in 2 groups because I'm not sure where it should go.
>> > I
>> > apologize in advance.
>> >
>> > I'm having a power failure problem with my computer. It can be on for
> up
>> > to
>> > 30 min and then it'll power off by itself. I'll let it sit for about 5
>> > minutes and when I go to turn it back on, nothing happens. I have to
>> > unplug
>> > the power cord from the power supply and power it back on that way.
> I've
>> > run a couple of system utilities program and they didn't detect any
>> > problems. I've also checked the device manager and there are no yellow
>> > question or exclamation marks and no red Xs. This has been happening
> for
>> > a
>> > while now.
>> >
>> > My computer specs are: Compaq Presario 6320 w/WinXP Home, AMD Athlon
>> > XP
>> > 2000+ processor (1.67ghz), 768mb ram, 60gb hard drive, cdrw and DVD rom
>> > drives.
>> >
>> > Does anyone know what could be causing this to happen and how do I fix
> it?
>> > Could it be a faulty power supply? Please help. All replies and
>> > suggestions will be appreciated.
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Thanks Will for your reply! I think that's what I'll do - upgrade the power
supply.

"Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
news:%23vgYVoOzEHA.3416@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Hi
>
> You really need a bigger power supply than that. Something in region of
> 400+ would be better.
>
> --
>
> Will Denny
> MS-MVP - Windows Shell/User
> Please reply to the News Groups
>
>
> "newtechie" <wgrant49@somedomain.com> wrote in message
> news:uYNTEkOzEHA.1264@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> > It's a 200W
> >
> > "Will Denny" <willdenny@mvps.org> wrote in message
> > news:uARkKcOzEHA.2656@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> >> Hi
> >>
> >> What size power supply have you got?
> >>
> >> --
> >>
> >> Will Denny
> >> MS-MVP - Windows Shell/User
> >> Please reply to the News Groups
> >>
> >>
> >> "newtechie" <wgrant49@somedomain.com> wrote in message
> >> news:O1f$BaOzEHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> >> > Hello all -
> >> >
> >> > I'm posting this in 2 groups because I'm not sure where it should go.
> >> > I
> >> > apologize in advance.
> >> >
> >> > I'm having a power failure problem with my computer. It can be on
for
> > up
> >> > to
> >> > 30 min and then it'll power off by itself. I'll let it sit for about
5
> >> > minutes and when I go to turn it back on, nothing happens. I have to
> >> > unplug
> >> > the power cord from the power supply and power it back on that way.
> > I've
> >> > run a couple of system utilities program and they didn't detect any
> >> > problems. I've also checked the device manager and there are no
yellow
> >> > question or exclamation marks and no red Xs. This has been happening
> > for
> >> > a
> >> > while now.
> >> >
> >> > My computer specs are: Compaq Presario 6320 w/WinXP Home, AMD Athlon
> >> > XP
> >> > 2000+ processor (1.67ghz), 768mb ram, 60gb hard drive, cdrw and DVD
rom
> >> > drives.
> >> >
> >> > Does anyone know what could be causing this to happen and how do I
fix
> > it?
> >> > Could it be a faulty power supply? Please help. All replies and
> >> > suggestions will be appreciated.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
 

SERVO

Distinguished
Mar 22, 2001
302
0
18,780
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Cari (MS-MVP) wrote:
> Your PSU is far too low for the system.... I'd suggest at least 350w,
> however your problem seems to be caused by overheating rather than a faulty
> PSU.... although it could be the fan in the PSU.
>
> When it next comes on, check ALL fans in the PC, especially the one on the
> CPU and the one in the PSU.

Roger that...and don't skimp, get a GOOD one like a good Antech. PSUs DO
make a BIG difference. And put in as many case fans as your case can
accomodate.

--
Servo
"Long live the New Flesh!"
tservo100 at
ameritech dot net
Slow, fiery death to all spammers!!!
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hi Tom,

Thanks for your reply. I went and read over the postings from the links
suggested. I'm sorry but I did not understand any of it. I'm not too
familiar with power supplies and hardware of that nature.

There are no errors in event viewer. I've gone as far as dusting the fans
to no avail. I unhooked the power supply from the motherboard and replugged
it in. Still nothing. The computer has cut off twice in a 45 min. time
frame. The first 20 min and the second 10 min.

I'm beginning to rule out an overheating problem because the room the
computer is in is very cold and I took the side casing off to see if that
would help the inside breath a little. I noticed that the green power light
on the front of the computer remained on, but the power supply light on the
back wasn't. I let the computer sit for 15 min. in case overheating was a
factor and then tried to turn it back on but it did not power up. I again
had to unplug the cord from the back of the power supply, reconnect and then
power on the computer.

I don't know if the O/S could be causing this. Could it? Should I now
assume I have a faulty power supply? Any other suggestions?

Thanks,
Newtechie

"w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:419BE8EB.409213C1@hotmail.com...
> Many brand name systems work just fine with a 250 watt
> supply. 400 watts is well beyond what most everyone needs.
> But then too many buy 'dumped' import supplies - making a
> decision based only on price. The supply that is labeled 400
> watts may only be 300 watts or less. So many computer
> assemblers simply buy larger supplies rather than learn why
> failures happen.
>
> Discovering a power supply problem is quick and easy. Takes
> but minutes and does not remove or change anything. No reason
> to replace a supply unless it first is obviously a problem.
> Procedure will probably take longer to read than it takes to
> determine if power supply is really undersized:
> "Computer doesnt start at all" in alt.comp.hardware on 10
> Jan 2004 at
> http://tinyurl.com/2t69q or
> "I think my power supply is dead" in alt.comp.hardware on 5
> Feb 2004 at http://www.tinyurl.com/2musa
>
> In the meantime, what did system (event) logs report?
>
> You symptoms can be created by a power supply controller
> that is located on motherboard. Replacing the power supply
> would not solve this problem. However heat is an excellent
> diagnostic tool. Selectively heat motherboard sections and
> other computer components with a hairdryer on high. That is a
> normal operating temperature for all computer parts. A
> properly working computer must work just fine in a room at
> over 100 degree F. But intermittent components tend to fail
> when heated. Heat is another diagnostic tool to locate a
> defective part without wildly replacing anything.
>
> Again, 400+ watt power supplies are well above what a
> typical computer system requires. If power supply is too
> small, that above procedure will identify the problem
> immediately. And the event log says ...?
>
> newtechie wrote:
>> Thanks so much for your reply. I'm unsure why the fan is not coming
>> on if overheating is the cause. The fan on the CPU sounds and looks
>> normal. I might just have to buy another power supply.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

System utilities usually will not catch a hardware problem. Some, such as
Motherboard Monitor 5 (now discontinued) do. But, if you have a successful
boot, the problem is presently not presenting itself so the program will not
detect anything as being wrong.

You have an intermittent hardware problem - maybe power supply, cooling
fans, CPU etc. If you don't have replacement parts that you can swap in,
take the computer to a "reputable" repair person.

--

Regards:

Richard Urban

aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :)


"newtechie" <wgrant49@somedomain.com> wrote in message
news:O1f$BaOzEHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Hello all -
>
> I'm posting this in 2 groups because I'm not sure where it should go. I
> apologize in advance.
>
> I'm having a power failure problem with my computer. It can be on for up
> to
> 30 min and then it'll power off by itself. I'll let it sit for about 5
> minutes and when I go to turn it back on, nothing happens. I have to
> unplug
> the power cord from the power supply and power it back on that way. I've
> run a couple of system utilities program and they didn't detect any
> problems. I've also checked the device manager and there are no yellow
> question or exclamation marks and no red Xs. This has been happening for
> a
> while now.
>
> My computer specs are: Compaq Presario 6320 w/WinXP Home, AMD Athlon XP
> 2000+ processor (1.67ghz), 768mb ram, 60gb hard drive, cdrw and DVD rom
> drives.
>
> Does anyone know what could be causing this to happen and how do I fix it?
> Could it be a faulty power supply? Please help. All replies and
> suggestions will be appreciated.
>
>
>
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I'll voice with most of the other folks here -- get a new (and better)
power supply. About a year ago a family member with a PC from one of
the cheaper manufacturers had the exact same problem as you are
describing. We replaced the power supply with a beefier, named-brand
PSU, and the problem went away (and stayed away).

If you PC was a low-cost purchase, it is highly likely that it shipped
with a lame power supply. Not only is 200W small, it's also likely
that the PSU is cheap and flakey.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

If that procedure to verify power supply integrity is too
complex, then you are reading too much into it. You take a
meter. You put meter leads on black wire and yellow wire
(where power supply connects to motherboard). Number
displayed on meter is recorded on paper. Repeat this for
orange wire, red wire, etc. When done, compare those recorded
numbers with numbers in chart. If numbers are within (upper
3/4) limits, then power supply is just fine - move on. If
numbers are below limits (or within bottom 1/4 of those
limits), then power supply is probably slowly failing. Its
that simple - only two minutes.

Again, it takes many times more minutes even to swap a
supply. Do not start wildly replacing things since that also
can complicate your solution. Procedure to verify power supply
integrity is that quick, that comprehensive, and that simple.
Nothing in those procedures is complex (except if you are
trying to learn too soon why you are doing things). Don't get
caught up trying to understand why you are doing that.
Learning the whys comes later with your next questions. Do
the procedure and don't even look back.

Also ignore nonsense about removing dust. Computers are
designed with significant dust accumulation already expected.
Furthermore, those who install too many fans to fix defective
hardware have excessive dust accumulation. If heat was a
problem, then when hair dryer (on high) was directed to a
defective component, component would fail immediately. Why?
Everything in that computer must work just fine even when room
temperature is above 100 degree F. OS also will not cause
this. If OS did, then fact would probably be posted in event
logs.

You have a perfect situation to learn which component caused
power failure. A power supply system is three components: the
PSU, a controller on motherboard, and power switch. Again,
get the meter. You cannot see electrons. Record voltage
readings of purple, green, and gray (etc) wires when power is
off AND when power switch is pressed AND when computer is on.
If you don't understand what those readings mean, then post
them here. You problem is that you are starving everyone
(including yourself) of important facts. I can take you far
beyond what other posters can accomplish BUT you must not
starve me of facts. Get the 3.5 digit multimeter.

Blindly follow the procedure in those previous posts. If
you don't understand, then post numbers here. Collecting
those numbers should take but a few minutes. You will learn
how to fish rather than just be feed fish. IOW you will
accomplish far more than just fix a computer.

In the meantime, start the process of getting additional
free tools. For example, every responsible computer
manufacturer provides comprehensive diagnostics on their web
site - for free. If manufacturer is not so responsible, then
start collecting freeware diagnostics such as memory (Memtst86
or Docmem), components (ie go to hard drive manufacturer for
his diagnostics), etc. Once we establish power supply
integrity, then we can move on to other 'usual' suspects. We
must first verify power supply integrity with the 3.5 digit
multimeter long before we can move on to other 'usual'
suspects.

Some obvious questions - your computer is plugged into a
properly safety grounded three prong outlet. All connected
peripherals share a common safety ground. You don't have
static electricity problems - the building has a humidifier.
No reason to assume anything. Computer repair is really quite
straight forward. You replace a part because part is
obviously defective. In but two minutes with a 3.5 digit
multimeter, you have all the facts necessary to say whether
power supply is good or bad.

If you do start looking at power supplies, then you are
asking for more and future problems if the supply is a
discounted (less than $60 retail) type. How do they lower
price? Forget to include essential functions that were even
defacto standard 30 years ago. Its called dumping. And so
many North Americans have so little computer knowledge as to
buy these 'defective by design' supplies.

Newtechie wrote:
> Hi Tom,
> Thanks for your reply. I went and read over the postings from the
> links suggested. I'm sorry but I did not understand any of it.
> I'm not too familiar with power supplies and hardware of that
> nature.
>
> There are no errors in event viewer. I've gone as far as dusting
> the fans to no avail. I unhooked the power supply from the
> motherboard and replugged it in. Still nothing. The computer
> has cut off twice in a 45 min. time frame. The first 20 min and
> the second 10 min.
>
> I'm beginning to rule out an overheating problem because the room
> the computer is in is very cold and I took the side casing off to
> see if that would help the inside breath a little. I noticed that
> the green power light on the front of the computer remained on, but
> the power supply light on the back wasn't. I let the computer sit
> for 15 min. in case overheating was a factor and then tried to turn
> it back on but it did not power up. I again had to unplug the cord
> from the back of the power supply, reconnect and then power on
> the computer.
>
> I don't know if the O/S could be causing this. Could it? Should
> I now assume I have a faulty power supply? Any other suggestions?
>
> Thanks,
> Newtechie
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Removing power cord is necessary to clear power supply
lockout. Where is that lockout function located? On
motherboard. Does he keep buying new parts and swapping - or
locate problem in minutes with a meter?

Where is a standard computer system that requires anything
near to 425 watts. This is the nonsense I am exposing. 425
watts is the urban myth posted, in part, because too many
computer experts don't even learn basic functions in a power
supply. They even buy 300 watt supplies that have a 425 watt
label. That intentional mislabeling on 'dumped' power
supplies is proof enough that all computers require more than
400 watts.

Most every computer is just fine with a 250 watt supply. In
another post, the 400 watt supply also listed amperage for
each individual voltage. Bottom line was the 400 watt supply
really was only 300 watts. These 'dumped' supplies are quite
common where repairmen don't first collect facts - instead
just wildly speculate and shotgun a solution. The typical
computer system needs no where near 425 watts.

jeffrey wrote:
> Sounds like a hardware problem. If you have to keep unplugging the
> power supply directly from the wall socket, it could either be its
> going bad or some part of the motherboard`s power integration system
> is bad. Best thing to do is, either try using a different power
> supply from another computer (if you have another to use), take the
>current one out and have it tested.
>
> OS wouldn`t have anything to do with it not wanting to power on.
> Even when there is no OS on the computer, you should just get the
> basic startup screen showing the memory check, video version,
> choice of entering the bios setup, etc.
>
> You could also just take both the power supply and mother board to
> a computer store that can do hardware testing. Also, if you are
> running a P4, I hear it is recommended to have a power supply
> with at least 425 watts.
>
> Jeff
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Tom,

I'll be more than happy to try your suggestion(s) but I don't what a 3.5
digit multimeter is or where to buy one. How much are they?

Newtechie

"w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:419CC8F9.7A63C97E@hotmail.com...
> If that procedure to verify power supply integrity is too
> complex, then you are reading too much into it. You take a
> meter. You put meter leads on black wire and yellow wire
> (where power supply connects to motherboard). Number
> displayed on meter is recorded on paper. Repeat this for
> orange wire, red wire, etc. When done, compare those recorded
> numbers with numbers in chart. If numbers are within (upper
> 3/4) limits, then power supply is just fine - move on. If
> numbers are below limits (or within bottom 1/4 of those
> limits), then power supply is probably slowly failing. Its
> that simple - only two minutes.
>
> Again, it takes many times more minutes even to swap a
> supply. Do not start wildly replacing things since that also
> can complicate your solution. Procedure to verify power supply
> integrity is that quick, that comprehensive, and that simple.
> Nothing in those procedures is complex (except if you are
> trying to learn too soon why you are doing things). Don't get
> caught up trying to understand why you are doing that.
> Learning the whys comes later with your next questions. Do
> the procedure and don't even look back.
>
> Also ignore nonsense about removing dust. Computers are
> designed with significant dust accumulation already expected.
> Furthermore, those who install too many fans to fix defective
> hardware have excessive dust accumulation. If heat was a
> problem, then when hair dryer (on high) was directed to a
> defective component, component would fail immediately. Why?
> Everything in that computer must work just fine even when room
> temperature is above 100 degree F. OS also will not cause
> this. If OS did, then fact would probably be posted in event
> logs.
>
> You have a perfect situation to learn which component caused
> power failure. A power supply system is three components: the
> PSU, a controller on motherboard, and power switch. Again,
> get the meter. You cannot see electrons. Record voltage
> readings of purple, green, and gray (etc) wires when power is
> off AND when power switch is pressed AND when computer is on.
> If you don't understand what those readings mean, then post
> them here. You problem is that you are starving everyone
> (including yourself) of important facts. I can take you far
> beyond what other posters can accomplish BUT you must not
> starve me of facts. Get the 3.5 digit multimeter.
>
> Blindly follow the procedure in those previous posts. If
> you don't understand, then post numbers here. Collecting
> those numbers should take but a few minutes. You will learn
> how to fish rather than just be feed fish. IOW you will
> accomplish far more than just fix a computer.
>
> In the meantime, start the process of getting additional
> free tools. For example, every responsible computer
> manufacturer provides comprehensive diagnostics on their web
> site - for free. If manufacturer is not so responsible, then
> start collecting freeware diagnostics such as memory (Memtst86
> or Docmem), components (ie go to hard drive manufacturer for
> his diagnostics), etc. Once we establish power supply
> integrity, then we can move on to other 'usual' suspects. We
> must first verify power supply integrity with the 3.5 digit
> multimeter long before we can move on to other 'usual'
> suspects.
>
> Some obvious questions - your computer is plugged into a
> properly safety grounded three prong outlet. All connected
> peripherals share a common safety ground. You don't have
> static electricity problems - the building has a humidifier.
> No reason to assume anything. Computer repair is really quite
> straight forward. You replace a part because part is
> obviously defective. In but two minutes with a 3.5 digit
> multimeter, you have all the facts necessary to say whether
> power supply is good or bad.
>
> If you do start looking at power supplies, then you are
> asking for more and future problems if the supply is a
> discounted (less than $60 retail) type. How do they lower
> price? Forget to include essential functions that were even
> defacto standard 30 years ago. Its called dumping. And so
> many North Americans have so little computer knowledge as to
> buy these 'defective by design' supplies.
>
> Newtechie wrote:
> > Hi Tom,
> > Thanks for your reply. I went and read over the postings from the
> > links suggested. I'm sorry but I did not understand any of it.
> > I'm not too familiar with power supplies and hardware of that
> > nature.
> >
> > There are no errors in event viewer. I've gone as far as dusting
> > the fans to no avail. I unhooked the power supply from the
> > motherboard and replugged it in. Still nothing. The computer
> > has cut off twice in a 45 min. time frame. The first 20 min and
> > the second 10 min.
> >
> > I'm beginning to rule out an overheating problem because the room
> > the computer is in is very cold and I took the side casing off to
> > see if that would help the inside breath a little. I noticed that
> > the green power light on the front of the computer remained on, but
> > the power supply light on the back wasn't. I let the computer sit
> > for 15 min. in case overheating was a factor and then tried to turn
> > it back on but it did not power up. I again had to unplug the cord
> > from the back of the power supply, reconnect and then power on
> > the computer.
> >
> > I don't know if the O/S could be causing this. Could it? Should
> > I now assume I have a faulty power supply? Any other suggestions?
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Newtechie
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=3+1%2F2+digit+multimeter

newtechie wrote:

> Tom,
>
> I'll be more than happy to try your suggestion(s) but I don't what a 3.5
> digit multimeter is or where to buy one. How much are they?
>
> Newtechie
>
> "w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:419CC8F9.7A63C97E@hotmail.com...
>
>> If that procedure to verify power supply integrity is too
>>complex, then you are reading too much into it. You take a
>>meter. You put meter leads on black wire and yellow wire
>>(where power supply connects to motherboard). Number
>>displayed on meter is recorded on paper. Repeat this for
>>orange wire, red wire, etc. When done, compare those recorded
>>numbers with numbers in chart. If numbers are within (upper
>>3/4) limits, then power supply is just fine - move on. If
>>numbers are below limits (or within bottom 1/4 of those
>>limits), then power supply is probably slowly failing. Its
>>that simple - only two minutes.
>>
>> Again, it takes many times more minutes even to swap a
>>supply. Do not start wildly replacing things since that also
>>can complicate your solution. Procedure to verify power supply
>>integrity is that quick, that comprehensive, and that simple.
>>Nothing in those procedures is complex (except if you are
>>trying to learn too soon why you are doing things). Don't get
>>caught up trying to understand why you are doing that.
>>Learning the whys comes later with your next questions. Do
>>the procedure and don't even look back.
>>
>> Also ignore nonsense about removing dust. Computers are
>>designed with significant dust accumulation already expected.
>>Furthermore, those who install too many fans to fix defective
>>hardware have excessive dust accumulation. If heat was a
>>problem, then when hair dryer (on high) was directed to a
>>defective component, component would fail immediately. Why?
>>Everything in that computer must work just fine even when room
>>temperature is above 100 degree F. OS also will not cause
>>this. If OS did, then fact would probably be posted in event
>>logs.
>>
>> You have a perfect situation to learn which component caused
>>power failure. A power supply system is three components: the
>>PSU, a controller on motherboard, and power switch. Again,
>>get the meter. You cannot see electrons. Record voltage
>>readings of purple, green, and gray (etc) wires when power is
>>off AND when power switch is pressed AND when computer is on.
>>If you don't understand what those readings mean, then post
>>them here. You problem is that you are starving everyone
>>(including yourself) of important facts. I can take you far
>>beyond what other posters can accomplish BUT you must not
>>starve me of facts. Get the 3.5 digit multimeter.
>>
>> Blindly follow the procedure in those previous posts. If
>>you don't understand, then post numbers here. Collecting
>>those numbers should take but a few minutes. You will learn
>>how to fish rather than just be feed fish. IOW you will
>>accomplish far more than just fix a computer.
>>
>> In the meantime, start the process of getting additional
>>free tools. For example, every responsible computer
>>manufacturer provides comprehensive diagnostics on their web
>>site - for free. If manufacturer is not so responsible, then
>>start collecting freeware diagnostics such as memory (Memtst86
>>or Docmem), components (ie go to hard drive manufacturer for
>>his diagnostics), etc. Once we establish power supply
>>integrity, then we can move on to other 'usual' suspects. We
>>must first verify power supply integrity with the 3.5 digit
>>multimeter long before we can move on to other 'usual'
>>suspects.
>>
>> Some obvious questions - your computer is plugged into a
>>properly safety grounded three prong outlet. All connected
>>peripherals share a common safety ground. You don't have
>>static electricity problems - the building has a humidifier.
>>No reason to assume anything. Computer repair is really quite
>>straight forward. You replace a part because part is
>>obviously defective. In but two minutes with a 3.5 digit
>>multimeter, you have all the facts necessary to say whether
>>power supply is good or bad.
>>
>> If you do start looking at power supplies, then you are
>>asking for more and future problems if the supply is a
>>discounted (less than $60 retail) type. How do they lower
>>price? Forget to include essential functions that were even
>>defacto standard 30 years ago. Its called dumping. And so
>>many North Americans have so little computer knowledge as to
>>buy these 'defective by design' supplies.
>>
>>Newtechie wrote:
>>
>>>Hi Tom,
>>>Thanks for your reply. I went and read over the postings from the
>>>links suggested. I'm sorry but I did not understand any of it.
>>>I'm not too familiar with power supplies and hardware of that
>>>nature.
>>>
>>>There are no errors in event viewer. I've gone as far as dusting
>>>the fans to no avail. I unhooked the power supply from the
>>>motherboard and replugged it in. Still nothing. The computer
>>>has cut off twice in a 45 min. time frame. The first 20 min and
>>>the second 10 min.
>>>
>>>I'm beginning to rule out an overheating problem because the room
>>>the computer is in is very cold and I took the side casing off to
>>>see if that would help the inside breath a little. I noticed that
>>>the green power light on the front of the computer remained on, but
>>>the power supply light on the back wasn't. I let the computer sit
>>>for 15 min. in case overheating was a factor and then tried to turn
>>>it back on but it did not power up. I again had to unplug the cord
>>>from the back of the power supply, reconnect and then power on
>>>the computer.
>>>
>>>I don't know if the O/S could be causing this. Could it? Should
>>>I now assume I have a faulty power supply? Any other suggestions?
>>>
>>>Thanks,
>>>Newtechie
>>>
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Thanks Bob.

"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:419CF80E.1060707@yahoo.com...
> http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=3+1%2F2+digit+multimeter
>
> newtechie wrote:
>
> > Tom,
> >
> > I'll be more than happy to try your suggestion(s) but I don't what a 3.5
> > digit multimeter is or where to buy one. How much are they?
> >
> > Newtechie
> >
> > "w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:419CC8F9.7A63C97E@hotmail.com...
> >
> >> If that procedure to verify power supply integrity is too
> >>complex, then you are reading too much into it. You take a
> >>meter. You put meter leads on black wire and yellow wire
> >>(where power supply connects to motherboard). Number
> >>displayed on meter is recorded on paper. Repeat this for
> >>orange wire, red wire, etc. When done, compare those recorded
> >>numbers with numbers in chart. If numbers are within (upper
> >>3/4) limits, then power supply is just fine - move on. If
> >>numbers are below limits (or within bottom 1/4 of those
> >>limits), then power supply is probably slowly failing. Its
> >>that simple - only two minutes.
> >>
> >> Again, it takes many times more minutes even to swap a
> >>supply. Do not start wildly replacing things since that also
> >>can complicate your solution. Procedure to verify power supply
> >>integrity is that quick, that comprehensive, and that simple.
> >>Nothing in those procedures is complex (except if you are
> >>trying to learn too soon why you are doing things). Don't get
> >>caught up trying to understand why you are doing that.
> >>Learning the whys comes later with your next questions. Do
> >>the procedure and don't even look back.
> >>
> >> Also ignore nonsense about removing dust. Computers are
> >>designed with significant dust accumulation already expected.
> >>Furthermore, those who install too many fans to fix defective
> >>hardware have excessive dust accumulation. If heat was a
> >>problem, then when hair dryer (on high) was directed to a
> >>defective component, component would fail immediately. Why?
> >>Everything in that computer must work just fine even when room
> >>temperature is above 100 degree F. OS also will not cause
> >>this. If OS did, then fact would probably be posted in event
> >>logs.
> >>
> >> You have a perfect situation to learn which component caused
> >>power failure. A power supply system is three components: the
> >>PSU, a controller on motherboard, and power switch. Again,
> >>get the meter. You cannot see electrons. Record voltage
> >>readings of purple, green, and gray (etc) wires when power is
> >>off AND when power switch is pressed AND when computer is on.
> >>If you don't understand what those readings mean, then post
> >>them here. You problem is that you are starving everyone
> >>(including yourself) of important facts. I can take you far
> >>beyond what other posters can accomplish BUT you must not
> >>starve me of facts. Get the 3.5 digit multimeter.
> >>
> >> Blindly follow the procedure in those previous posts. If
> >>you don't understand, then post numbers here. Collecting
> >>those numbers should take but a few minutes. You will learn
> >>how to fish rather than just be feed fish. IOW you will
> >>accomplish far more than just fix a computer.
> >>
> >> In the meantime, start the process of getting additional
> >>free tools. For example, every responsible computer
> >>manufacturer provides comprehensive diagnostics on their web
> >>site - for free. If manufacturer is not so responsible, then
> >>start collecting freeware diagnostics such as memory (Memtst86
> >>or Docmem), components (ie go to hard drive manufacturer for
> >>his diagnostics), etc. Once we establish power supply
> >>integrity, then we can move on to other 'usual' suspects. We
> >>must first verify power supply integrity with the 3.5 digit
> >>multimeter long before we can move on to other 'usual'
> >>suspects.
> >>
> >> Some obvious questions - your computer is plugged into a
> >>properly safety grounded three prong outlet. All connected
> >>peripherals share a common safety ground. You don't have
> >>static electricity problems - the building has a humidifier.
> >>No reason to assume anything. Computer repair is really quite
> >>straight forward. You replace a part because part is
> >>obviously defective. In but two minutes with a 3.5 digit
> >>multimeter, you have all the facts necessary to say whether
> >>power supply is good or bad.
> >>
> >> If you do start looking at power supplies, then you are
> >>asking for more and future problems if the supply is a
> >>discounted (less than $60 retail) type. How do they lower
> >>price? Forget to include essential functions that were even
> >>defacto standard 30 years ago. Its called dumping. And so
> >>many North Americans have so little computer knowledge as to
> >>buy these 'defective by design' supplies.
> >>
> >>Newtechie wrote:
> >>
> >>>Hi Tom,
> >>>Thanks for your reply. I went and read over the postings from the
> >>>links suggested. I'm sorry but I did not understand any of it.
> >>>I'm not too familiar with power supplies and hardware of that
> >>>nature.
> >>>
> >>>There are no errors in event viewer. I've gone as far as dusting
> >>>the fans to no avail. I unhooked the power supply from the
> >>>motherboard and replugged it in. Still nothing. The computer
> >>>has cut off twice in a 45 min. time frame. The first 20 min and
> >>>the second 10 min.
> >>>
> >>>I'm beginning to rule out an overheating problem because the room
> >>>the computer is in is very cold and I took the side casing off to
> >>>see if that would help the inside breath a little. I noticed that
> >>>the green power light on the front of the computer remained on, but
> >>>the power supply light on the back wasn't. I let the computer sit
> >>>for 15 min. in case overheating was a factor and then tried to turn
> >>>it back on but it did not power up. I again had to unplug the cord
> >>>from the back of the power supply, reconnect and then power on
> >>>the computer.
> >>>
> >>>I don't know if the O/S could be causing this. Could it? Should
> >>>I now assume I have a faulty power supply? Any other suggestions?
> >>>
> >>>Thanks,
> >>>Newtechie
> >>>
> >
> >
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

You're welcome. one link is worth a million words :)

newtechie wrote:

> Thanks Bob.
>
> "Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:419CF80E.1060707@yahoo.com...
>
>>http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=3+1%2F2+digit+multimeter
>>
>>newtechie wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Tom,
>>>
>>>I'll be more than happy to try your suggestion(s) but I don't what a 3.5
>>>digit multimeter is or where to buy one. How much are they?
>>>
>>>Newtechie
>>>
>>>"w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>>>news:419CC8F9.7A63C97E@hotmail.com...
>>>
>>>
>>>> If that procedure to verify power supply integrity is too
>>>>complex, then you are reading too much into it. You take a
>>>>meter. You put meter leads on black wire and yellow wire
>>>>(where power supply connects to motherboard). Number
>>>>displayed on meter is recorded on paper. Repeat this for
>>>>orange wire, red wire, etc. When done, compare those recorded
>>>>numbers with numbers in chart. If numbers are within (upper
>>>>3/4) limits, then power supply is just fine - move on. If
>>>>numbers are below limits (or within bottom 1/4 of those
>>>>limits), then power supply is probably slowly failing. Its
>>>>that simple - only two minutes.
>>>>
>>>> Again, it takes many times more minutes even to swap a
>>>>supply. Do not start wildly replacing things since that also
>>>>can complicate your solution. Procedure to verify power supply
>>>>integrity is that quick, that comprehensive, and that simple.
>>>>Nothing in those procedures is complex (except if you are
>>>>trying to learn too soon why you are doing things). Don't get
>>>>caught up trying to understand why you are doing that.
>>>>Learning the whys comes later with your next questions. Do
>>>>the procedure and don't even look back.
>>>>
>>>> Also ignore nonsense about removing dust. Computers are
>>>>designed with significant dust accumulation already expected.
>>>>Furthermore, those who install too many fans to fix defective
>>>>hardware have excessive dust accumulation. If heat was a
>>>>problem, then when hair dryer (on high) was directed to a
>>>>defective component, component would fail immediately. Why?
>>>>Everything in that computer must work just fine even when room
>>>>temperature is above 100 degree F. OS also will not cause
>>>>this. If OS did, then fact would probably be posted in event
>>>>logs.
>>>>
>>>> You have a perfect situation to learn which component caused
>>>>power failure. A power supply system is three components: the
>>>>PSU, a controller on motherboard, and power switch. Again,
>>>>get the meter. You cannot see electrons. Record voltage
>>>>readings of purple, green, and gray (etc) wires when power is
>>>>off AND when power switch is pressed AND when computer is on.
>>>>If you don't understand what those readings mean, then post
>>>>them here. You problem is that you are starving everyone
>>>>(including yourself) of important facts. I can take you far
>>>>beyond what other posters can accomplish BUT you must not
>>>>starve me of facts. Get the 3.5 digit multimeter.
>>>>
>>>> Blindly follow the procedure in those previous posts. If
>>>>you don't understand, then post numbers here. Collecting
>>>>those numbers should take but a few minutes. You will learn
>>>>how to fish rather than just be feed fish. IOW you will
>>>>accomplish far more than just fix a computer.
>>>>
>>>> In the meantime, start the process of getting additional
>>>>free tools. For example, every responsible computer
>>>>manufacturer provides comprehensive diagnostics on their web
>>>>site - for free. If manufacturer is not so responsible, then
>>>>start collecting freeware diagnostics such as memory (Memtst86
>>>>or Docmem), components (ie go to hard drive manufacturer for
>>>>his diagnostics), etc. Once we establish power supply
>>>>integrity, then we can move on to other 'usual' suspects. We
>>>>must first verify power supply integrity with the 3.5 digit
>>>>multimeter long before we can move on to other 'usual'
>>>>suspects.
>>>>
>>>> Some obvious questions - your computer is plugged into a
>>>>properly safety grounded three prong outlet. All connected
>>>>peripherals share a common safety ground. You don't have
>>>>static electricity problems - the building has a humidifier.
>>>>No reason to assume anything. Computer repair is really quite
>>>>straight forward. You replace a part because part is
>>>>obviously defective. In but two minutes with a 3.5 digit
>>>>multimeter, you have all the facts necessary to say whether
>>>>power supply is good or bad.
>>>>
>>>> If you do start looking at power supplies, then you are
>>>>asking for more and future problems if the supply is a
>>>>discounted (less than $60 retail) type. How do they lower
>>>>price? Forget to include essential functions that were even
>>>>defacto standard 30 years ago. Its called dumping. And so
>>>>many North Americans have so little computer knowledge as to
>>>>buy these 'defective by design' supplies.
>>>>
>>>>Newtechie wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Hi Tom,
>>>>>Thanks for your reply. I went and read over the postings from the
>>>>>links suggested. I'm sorry but I did not understand any of it.
>>>>>I'm not too familiar with power supplies and hardware of that
>>>>>nature.
>>>>>
>>>>>There are no errors in event viewer. I've gone as far as dusting
>>>>>the fans to no avail. I unhooked the power supply from the
>>>>>motherboard and replugged it in. Still nothing. The computer
>>>>>has cut off twice in a 45 min. time frame. The first 20 min and
>>>>>the second 10 min.
>>>>>
>>>>>I'm beginning to rule out an overheating problem because the room
>>>>>the computer is in is very cold and I took the side casing off to
>>>>>see if that would help the inside breath a little. I noticed that
>>>>>the green power light on the front of the computer remained on, but
>>>>>the power supply light on the back wasn't. I let the computer sit
>>>>>for 15 min. in case overheating was a factor and then tried to turn
>>>>>it back on but it did not power up. I again had to unplug the cord
>>>>>
>>>>>from the back of the power supply, reconnect and then power on
>>>>
>>>>>the computer.
>>>>>
>>>>>I don't know if the O/S could be causing this. Could it? Should
>>>>>I now assume I have a faulty power supply? Any other suggestions?
>>>>>
>>>>>Thanks,
>>>>>Newtechie
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Multimeters are so inexpensive and so ubiquitous as to be
sold in Radio Shack, Home Depot, Lowes, and Sears. They sell
anywhere from under $20 to $100 depending on the many
additional bells and whistles you may want. All will do what
that procedure requires.

BTW some motherboards have a voltage monitor function.
Monitor is poorly calibrated. The multimeter is required even
to calibrate the motherboard voltage monitor. Just another
function for that meter.

newtechie wrote:
> Tom,
> I'll be more than happy to try your suggestion(s) but I don't what a 3.5
> digit multimeter is or where to buy one. How much are they?
> Newtechie
 
G

Guest

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Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

There are digital multimeters designed for automotive work
and others designed for electronics. There are even meters
designed and priced for home and grade school use at about
$5.00

The description by 3.5 digit or 3-3/4 has to do with the
number of digits in the screen and the roll-over accuracy.

You need a meter with a very high impedance to work on
computer mobo and it needs a high frequency response. To
check the power supply only, almost any multimeter will
work.

Multimeter refers to a electrical measuring device that
reads Volts, AC and DC, and resistance and may also offer
capacitor tests.

There are many manufacturers of multimeters, Fluke, Simpson,
Tripplett come to mind.


--
The people think the Constitution protects their rights;
But government sees it as an obstacle to be overcome.


"w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:419D274C.FE7529AF@hotmail.com...
| Multimeters are so inexpensive and so ubiquitous as to be
| sold in Radio Shack, Home Depot, Lowes, and Sears. They
sell
| anywhere from under $20 to $100 depending on the many
| additional bells and whistles you may want. All will do
what
| that procedure requires.
|
| BTW some motherboards have a voltage monitor function.
| Monitor is poorly calibrated. The multimeter is required
even
| to calibrate the motherboard voltage monitor. Just
another
| function for that meter.
|
| newtechie wrote:
| > Tom,
| > I'll be more than happy to try your suggestion(s) but I
don't what a 3.5
| > digit multimeter is or where to buy one. How much are
they?
| > Newtechie