Question Computer rebooting after starting SPECIFIC game

Jul 12, 2019
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So my computer reboots itself if I change the game's graphics from low to medium. Even though I'm pretty sure that I have played on higher graphics before. The game? Heros of the storm. Now recently I had both a windows and graphics card update hit me, however, I removed those and still have the same issue. I'm starting to think its PSU, however, there's no good way to check. Any help?

Specs:
Processor: AMD Athlon(tm) X4 860K Quad Core Processor, 3700 Mhz, 2 Core(s), 4 Logical Processor(s)
BaseBoard Product FM2A88X Pro3+
16 GB DDR3 ram
2 monitors 20 inches
3 fans on the case but i doubt its that.

What's weird is the game ran fine a week ago...and is now not really running fine. Its probably not the graphics card driver as I went back with the updates that same issue and again the game worked fine before. So why do I think its PSU?

Because on the PSU the power toggle switch doesnt switch on and off anymore...its kinda...jiggling..
 
Jul 12, 2019
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If it reboots with no warning signs (blue screens etc), then it's a good chance you're looking at a PSU that can no longer provide adequate power.

What GPU do you have? What PSU are you using?
Nvidia 950 and its a 500W PSU idk the brand...also update the comp rebooted no warning on a less graphic intensive game...my suspicions for PSU go up..ive already bought PSU replacement as this one is old...Just...not looking forward to replacing the old one...
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
Without knowing the brand, it's impossible to say.

"500W", in theory, is plenty - but unfortunately, there are plenty of junk "500W" units out there that would be lucky to be accurately described as a 250W unit.

What did you purchase as a replacement?
 
Jul 12, 2019
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Without knowing the brand, it's impossible to say.

"500W", in theory, is plenty - but unfortunately, there are plenty of junk "500W" units out there that would be lucky to be accurately described as a 250W unit.

What did you purchase as a replacement?

https://www.newegg.com/raidmax-cobra-rx-700ac-b-continuous-700-watts/p/N82E16817152055?Item=N82E16817152055

seems good :) ? still yeah ill see if i can find the old info...

huh...heres the old info...I coulda sworn it was a 500W

https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16817148046?Item=N82E16817148046

if its not PSU ...i dunno what else it could be
 
Jul 12, 2019
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Jul 12, 2019
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Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
Because it's not about the wattage necessarily, it's the quality of the unit, the internal components, build quality, protections etc.

A CX450 is more than plenty for the system you're running, and most single GPU setups today. That Raidmax is junk.
 
Reactions: jonnyguru
Jul 12, 2019
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Because it's not about the wattage necessarily, it's the quality of the unit, the internal components, build quality, protections etc.

A CX450 is more than plenty for the system you're running, and most single GPU setups today. That Raidmax is junk.

Junk in what way? I dont see how going down in power is going to help me... I also dont see how its junk...both are on the bronze list...so..Sorry im still figuring this stuff out. but doesn't make sense to me why you are suggesting this one, no data nothing to back up your claims...and I dont wanna buy JUST ANY PSU
 

jonnyguru

Distinguished
why would I go down in wattage? why go down? cause im running 700w now...and idk how much power i need so....
Wattage is just a number slapped on the side of the PSU. There are a lot of garbage 700W PSUs. It "might" be able to do 700W for 10ms and only at 25°C temperatures and may not be able to react fast to transient load spikes, even if those spikes are around 500W. A good 500W PSU can handle transient loads, will do a constant 500W, 24/7, 365 days a year and do so at temperatures as high as 40 or 50°C.

There are good PSU reviews here on Tom's Hardware. You should try reading a couple to help you understand that there's a lot more to a PSU than the wattage number on the side.
 
Reactions: Barty1884
Jul 12, 2019
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Wattage is just a number slapped on the side of the PSU. There are a lot of garbage 700W PSUs. It "might" be able to do 700W for 10ms and only at 25°C temperatures and may not be able to react fast to transient load spikes, even if those spikes are around 500W. A good 500W PSU can handle transient loads, will do a constant 500W, 24/7, 365 days a year and do so at temperatures as high as 40 or 50°C.

There are good PSU reviews here on Tom's Hardware. You should try reading a couple to help you understand that there's a lot more to a PSU than the wattage number on the side.
Okay is there one simular to the one you suggested thats ...a bit more power? but still with those capabilities?
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
Sorry, I don't mean to come across as antagonistic, but what you did buy was

JUST ANY PSU
Unfortunately, many poor quality units exist because of the assumption that a label saying "700W" makes it 'good'. However, with a little bit of logic that the specific 700W unit you have retails for ~$40. In the same ballpark, you can't find anything from any competitor >450W.
Now, in itself, that doesn't actually say anything - as there is plenty of junk in the ~$40 range..... but it's one sign that all may not be as it seems.

Similarly, 80+ is a measure of efficiency, not quality. It's measuring how much is draw from the wall vs what the system requires. At the end of the day, the single unit, maybe a couple .... I'm not 100% sure (which may well have been cherry-picked for review) could meet the requirements for 80Plus certification, at the time it was submitted, and under the circumstances in which it was tested. Unfortunately, bait & switches could, and probably do happen. Similarly, that test for certification isn't X hours a day for X weeks/months/years that the consumer would be using it for. Efficiency is certainly a "nice to have"... but it's far from the be all end all.

There's much, much more that goes into a PSU in terms of quality than wattage alone. Too much to go into when there are specific articles about this subject specifically, by people much more qualified than I am to speak on the subject.
A quality 450-500W unit is more than adequate for what you need, and would serve you much, much better than a lower quality "700w" unit.

And, right off the bat, that "700W" unit is more akin to 600W, in theory at least.


50A x 12V = 600W (and I see nothing about operating temperature)

Vs something like a TX750M from Corsair:
62A x 12V = 744W @ 50'C.
https://www.corsair.com/us/en/Categories/Products/Power-Supply-Units/txm-series-2017-config/p/CP-9020131-NA#tab-downloads


EDIT
Too much to go into when there are specific articles about this subject specifically, by people much more qualified than I am to speak on the subject.
And JG would be a/the prime example!

Wattage is just a number slapped on the side of the PSU.

Okay is there one simular to the one you suggested thats ...a bit more power? but still with those capabilities?
You have a 65W TDP CPU, and a GPU that might draw 90-100W. Maybe another say 30W as a sum of the balance of your components (RAM etc).
So, you're in the ~200W range, max. Add even another 100W for overclocking headroom = 300W, which is probably vastly overstating the increase in power draw for that CPU/GPU combo...

An 80+ Bronze unit will be most efficient at 50% load. However, the difference between peak efficiency at 50% load and even max 100% is 85% vs 82%. That would be pretty negligible in a power bill.
In a more average sense, you'd be drawing more in the range of 200W. So a 450W unit (like the CX450 I linked earlier) would be ideal.
 
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jonnyguru

Distinguished
Okay is there one simular to the one you suggested thats ...a bit more power? but still with those capabilities?
Corsair CX450 is enough for your build. Not confident in that or want a PSU that can handle your next GPU upgrade? Then CX450, I guess.

And note we're saying CX450 and not CX450M. The one without the M is a better product and is actually cheaper than the "M" version. Not that the "M" version is particularly bad, just the non-M is better.
 
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