[SOLVED] computer shuts down

Apr 9, 2021
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A few months ago I bought a refurbished gpu rx590 and also a refurbished PSU Mars Gaming MPII750 (i know, I have little money) from amazon. The computer i have them in randomly shuts down. It was not a big problem as it only happened when i was using very demanding games (and not always, sometimes it would shut down and some other times, most of them, would go on without a problem). Recently it shut off while doing nothing very demanding. Temperatures dont seem to be a problem as neither the cpu nor the gpu go higher than 85 degrees celsius. A few seconds later the computer powers on again without a problem.

Is there any way to know whether the problem is the psu or the graphics card without changing them for new ones? Will any piece of software record what my computer is doing and tell me why it shut down?

Thanks!

windows 10
plexhd x79
xeon 2689
gpu rx590
PSU Mars Gaming MPII750 (750w) 7 months old, bought from amazon warehouse so it had been used by someone and returned
16gb ram
 
Last edited:

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Update your post to include full system hardware specs and OS information.

Include PSU: make, model, wattage, age, condition?

Look in Reliability History and Event Viewer for error codes, warnings, and informational events that correspond with the shutdowns.

Start with Reliability History. Much more user friendly and the the timeline format can prove very revealing and helpful.

= = = =

Another thing you can do:

Power down, unplug, open the case.

Clean out dust and debris.

Verify by sight and feel that all connectors, cards, RAM, and jumpers are fully and firmly in place.

Look for any signs of damage: kinked or pinched cables, browned/blackened components, bare wire conductor showing, cracks, loose components.
 
Reactions: moquetes

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Update your post to include full system hardware specs and OS information.

Include PSU: make, model, wattage, age, condition?

Look in Reliability History and Event Viewer for error codes, warnings, and informational events that correspond with the shutdowns.

Start with Reliability History. Much more user friendly and the the timeline format can prove very revealing and helpful.

= = = =

Another thing you can do:

Power down, unplug, open the case.

Clean out dust and debris.

Verify by sight and feel that all connectors, cards, RAM, and jumpers are fully and firmly in place.

Look for any signs of damage: kinked or pinched cables, browned/blackened components, bare wire conductor showing, cracks, loose components.
 
Reactions: moquetes
Apr 9, 2021
7
0
10
0
Update your post to include full system hardware specs and OS information.

Include PSU: make, model, wattage, age, condition?

Look in Reliability History and Event Viewer for error codes, warnings, and informational events that correspond with the shutdowns.

Start with Reliability History. Much more user friendly and the the timeline format can prove very revealing and helpful.

= = = =

Another thing you can do:

Power down, unplug, open the case.

Clean out dust and debris.

Verify by sight and feel that all connectors, cards, RAM, and jumpers are fully and firmly in place.

Look for any signs of damage: kinked or pinched cables, browned/blackened components, bare wire conductor showing, cracks, loose components.
Thank you for your answer. I updated the first post.

I did the cleaning bit and it all seems fine.

The Reliability History shows me just one critical event and it only states "windows was not properly shut down 04/04/2021 19:56". I suppose this is when my computer shut down but I am not sure as I dont remember the exact date.

I checked Event Viewer around the time when Reliability History says the error happened. This is what it says:

04/04/2021 19:56:56 Error: The previous system shutdown at 19:45:55 on ‎03/‎04/‎2021 was unexpected. (not sure why it says this taking into account it was from the day before, also this one appears before even though it seems to happen after the next error.

There are some information events in between.

04/04/2021 19:56:35 Critical: The system has rebooted without cleanly shutting down first. This error could be caused if the system stopped responding, crashed, or lost power unexpectedly.

I would have posted images but I dont know how. In any case it looks like the problem lies on the PSU, doesnt it?
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
You can post images via Imgur.

https://imgur.com/

(New Post, upper left corner.)

How far back are you able to look in Reliabiity History?

View by "weeks" and focus on Critical events.

A previously used PSU is certainly suspect. There is no way to really know what the previous owner(s) may have used/abused that PSU.

I did a quick check for product reviews - did not note any "standout" reviews either positive or negative.

Several sites required translation.

That all said, the PSU is a likely suspect.

If you, a family member, or friend has a multimeter you can do some testing on the PSU.

An out of tolerance or close to out of tolerance voltage would be another problem flag.
 
Reactions: moquetes
Apr 9, 2021
7
0
10
0
You can post images via Imgur.

https://imgur.com/

(New Post, upper left corner.)

How far back are you able to look in Reliabiity History?

View by "weeks" and focus on Critical events.

A previously used PSU is certainly suspect. There is no way to really know what the previous owner(s) may have used/abused that PSU.

I did a quick check for product reviews - did not note any "standout" reviews either positive or negative.

Several sites required translation.

That all said, the PSU is a likely suspect.

If you, a family member, or friend has a multimeter you can do some testing on the PSU.

An out of tolerance or close to out of tolerance voltage would be another problem flag.

Thank you for your answer, I finally had the time to google what an out of tolerance test was and I can now say the PSU is the problem. The blue cable gave me 11,47v when it should be between 11.52v and 12.48v, another one, dont remember which one was right in the limit (so i guess that one qualifies for "close to out of tolerance voltage". Here is a tutorial on how to do a PSU test with a multimeter, in case someone stumbles on this thread

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tr70VyoACPg


Knowing this, if I was to play a very demanding game, am I risking doing any damage to any components of the computer? Are there any other implications to be aware of? I will be changing the PSU as soon as I can but I would like to know what my risks are till then.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
I would not risk a known faulty PSU - especially to play a game(s) that have proven problematic when it comes to power (wattage) demands.

And I would certainly ensure that all important data was backed up at least 2x with verification that the data is recoverable and readable.

With backups to a target locations off of your computer.
 
Apr 9, 2021
7
0
10
0
I would not risk a known faulty PSU - especially to play a game(s) that have proven problematic when it comes to power (wattage) demands.

And I would certainly ensure that all important data was backed up at least 2x with verification that the data is recoverable and readable.

With backups to a target locations off of your computer.

We can confidently say that it was the PSU, can you mark the question as solved? If I can I have not been able to find how.

Thank you for your comments and your help, they've been very valuable :)
 

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