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Question Computer shuts off when playing games

Jun 21, 2019
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Hello everyone,

I bought my PC 3 years ago, everything seemed fined until 1-2 weeks ago when it started randomly shutting down when playing video games(after 10-30mins).
At first I thought it may be related to heat wave in my country, but after checking GPU/CPU temperatures just before the crashes everything looked normally(I was using HWMonitor and CoreTemp), CPU had 50-60 °C and GPU 65-72 °C.
After opening the case and clearing all the fans I was able to play games normally for 3-4 hours but then it started shutting off again, I even started leaving one side of the case completly open and it didn't help at all, the only thing I've noticed is that GPU is very hot on the "circuit" side/cool on "fans" side.
So I'm totally lost and I have no idea what may be the issue here, I've read it may be PSU related issue but for 2-3 years there were no issues with it.

Specs:
Windows 10 Home
Motherboard: Gigabyte AORUS GA-Z270X-Gaming K5
GPU: NVIDIA Geforce GTX 1070
CPU: Intel Core i7 7700k 4.2GHz
Water cooling: Cooler Master MasterLiquid 120 Pro
PSU: EVGA SUPERNOVA 650P2 80 PLUS PLATINUM 650W
RAM: DDR4 16GB 1200MHz
HDD: WDC WD20EZRZ 2TB
SSD: Crucial CT275 MX300 275GB
 
Jun 21, 2019
4
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Use HWMonitor to watch your voltages and then run Heaven benchmark. If your voltages waver too much (more than +/-5%), it's your power supply.

-Wolf sends
I ran Heaven bechmark, the only voltages that were constantly jumping were CPU VID#0-VID#4 voltages, from ~1.120V to ~1.180V and even sometimes to 0.900V, looking at it now, these values are jumping even when computer is idle from 0.760V to 0.900V. Everything else looked stable for most part, maybe some motherboard voltages changed but not that drastically.
 

Wolfshadw

Titan
Moderator
The only way to know for sure is to retest using your current power supply and run multiple tests with a known good power supply. If it continues to fail with your old PSU and continually succeeds with a known good power supply, then yes. It's your power supply.

-Wolf sends
 

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