Computer spark from light strip

jonesnf

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Sep 27, 2015
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I recently built a computer and got a light strip by cable mod to use with it. I didn’t know if the cable was compatable with RGB fusion but i plunged it into the header. When i turned on my computer there was a spark and everything shut off. I know that something fried and i just need to know what components it could’ve affected. There is a dark burn spot right above the RGB Header but that is the only damage i can see from looking at it without taking it apart. I don’t smell anything from any of the components. I will take apart my computer to see what the back of my motherboard looks like.

Specs:
gigabyte HD3P z370 mobo
i5 8400
gigabyte 980ti
thermaltake 750w psu
hyperx fury 8GB ram

the link to the light strip:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B074HHNTXR/ref=asc_df_B074HHNTXR5314076/?tag=hyprod-20&creative=395033&creativeASIN=B074HHNTXR&linkCode=df0&hvadid=198093101467&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=15472302067480472973&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=m&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9007390&hvtargid=pla-358490042081
 


If you have a multi-meter it would be also be advisable to take a reading of the voltages when you do the paperclip test... either that or get an inexpensive power supply tester that basically does the same thing. They don't put a load on the power supply but at least you'll know if any voltage is way high and could damage anything. Also, if a fuse is blown on an output in the PS you won't get the voltage even though it seems to turn on. In normal operation if the motherboard doesn't see stable voltages it will tell the power supply to turn back off almost immediately. The paper clip test by-passes that in a brute-force effort to just turn on an orphaned power supply.

You could check real close around the 24 pin connector for one or more fuse; they'll most likely be small SMT devices but in series with the 12 volts so pretty easy to ohm-out with a meter. Of course, if you do find it fixing it will be a bear without microscope and temp controlled solder station. I've no real idea if they put that kind of protection on motherboards (that are made as cheap as possible, after all) but it may be worth a try if you're interested in attempting a repair.

 

jonesnf

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Sep 27, 2015
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Thanks for the reply, would any of the other components be affected? Or would the power supply have shut it off before anything happened to them. I can replace the motherboard without an issue but it would be harder to replace all of the parts.
 

jonesnf

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Sep 27, 2015
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I did the paper clip test for my power supply and it turned on just fine. I don’t know if this still could mean it’s the issue or if it would damage a new one. The only damage i could see visibly was that burn mark on the rgb header. I do not smell or see any damage to any other components. I really hope i just fried the motherboard. I’m thinking i’m just going to order a new HD3P in january and i’ll see how it goes. What do you guys think of this?
 


If you have a multi-meter it would be also be advisable to take a reading of the voltages when you do the paperclip test... either that or get an inexpensive power supply tester that basically does the same thing. They don't put a load on the power supply but at least you'll know if any voltage is way high and could damage anything. Also, if a fuse is blown on an output in the PS you won't get the voltage even though it seems to turn on. In normal operation if the motherboard doesn't see stable voltages it will tell the power supply to turn back off almost immediately. The paper clip test by-passes that in a brute-force effort to just turn on an orphaned power supply.

You could check real close around the 24 pin connector for one or more fuse; they'll most likely be small SMT devices but in series with the 12 volts so pretty easy to ohm-out with a meter. Of course, if you do find it fixing it will be a bear without microscope and temp controlled solder station. I've no real idea if they put that kind of protection on motherboards (that are made as cheap as possible, after all) but it may be worth a try if you're interested in attempting a repair.

 

jonesnf

Reputable
Sep 27, 2015
19
0
4,510
0
Thanks for everyone’s help. I actually resolved this issue last week. I checked all of the pins on my power supply with a multimeter i picked up when i bought a new motherboard. Everything was fine with it and i replaces the motherboard. My computer started right up without an issue. Thanks for your help everyone!
 

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