Question Computer Will Not Turn On after shutdown unless PSU is switched off and on again.

DominicU1571

Honorable
Dec 31, 2013
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As the thread title describes, my newly built computer will not turn on via power button on case after a shutdown unless I first switch off the power supply and switch it back on. Once I do so, the computer runs just fine with no issues. However, everytime I shutdown my system, this is something I have to do, otherwise, the system will not turn on.

System Specs:
MOBO: ASUS Crosshair VIII Hero
RAM: 32 GB Corsair Dominator Platinum
CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600
AIO: Corsair H150i Elite Capellix 360mm
GPU: ASUS GTX Strix 1080
PSU: EVGA G3 850W
Case: Lian Li 011 Dynamic
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Unplug ALL of the wiring coming from the case front I/O and switches to the motherboard, after unplugging and switching off the PSU of course.

Then, plug the PSU back in and switch it back on. Now, attempt to start the system by jumping the two power pins that the switch from the front of the case WAS previously connected to. Once it powers up and boots, shut it back down and try to power it up again WITHOUT switching off the PSU, by jumping the pins again. You can jump the pwr pins to turn and to turn off, if you don't wish to complete the boot process each time just for verification.

If the system does not want to power on, even with those connections unplugged, by jumping the pwr pins after the first try, without switching off the power supply again, then there are a couple of things it could be.

First, are you SURE you installed the standoffs into the case before installing the motherboard, or did you screw the motherboard directly to the case motherboard tray without any standoffs? And, are you SURE that there are ONLY the exact number of standoffs that line directly up with the standoff holes in the motherboard, and no standoffs installed in locations in the motherboard tray which do not have a corresponding hole in the motherboard for mounting?

If the standoffs aren't the problem, then could also be a fastener you lost or dropped and then forgot, that got pinched in between the motherboard and the motherboard tray while installing the motherboard.

Short of those two things, or a bad switch on the front of the case, it would have to pretty much be either the PSU or the motherboard and unfortunately in order to determine which of those it is you pretty much have to swap in a different PSU or motherboard to eliminate one of them.

Bench testing can be very helpful too.

 

DominicU1571

Honorable
Dec 31, 2013
13
0
10,510
0
Unplug ALL of the wiring coming from the case front I/O and switches to the motherboard, after unplugging and switching off the PSU of course.

Then, plug the PSU back in and switch it back on. Now, attempt to start the system by jumping the two power pins that the switch from the front of the case WAS previously connected to. Once it powers up and boots, shut it back down and try to power it up again WITHOUT switching off the PSU, by jumping the pins again. You can jump the pwr pins to turn and to turn off, if you don't wish to complete the boot process each time just for verification.

If the system does not want to power on, even with those connections unplugged, by jumping the pwr pins after the first try, without switching off the power supply again, then there are a couple of things it could be.

First, are you SURE you installed the standoffs into the case before installing the motherboard, or did you screw the motherboard directly to the case motherboard tray without any standoffs? And, are you SURE that there are ONLY the exact number of standoffs that line directly up with the standoff holes in the motherboard, and no standoffs installed in locations in the motherboard tray which do not have a corresponding hole in the motherboard for mounting?

If the standoffs aren't the problem, then could also be a fastener you lost or dropped and then forgot, that got pinched in between the motherboard and the motherboard tray while installing the motherboard.

Short of those two things, or a bad switch on the front of the case, it would have to pretty much be either the PSU or the motherboard and unfortunately in order to determine which of those it is you pretty much have to swap in a different PSU or motherboard to eliminate one of them.

Bench testing can be very helpful too.

I will give these tests a try tomorrow during the day, I previously had a different motherboard in the system but was having a RAM related issue with that motherboard and decided to swap it out with another after a full day of trying to fix it. Seeing as it was the same power supply with that different motherboard, I would figure this is motherboard related. I'll double check all my connections and come back with an update on this tomorrow after testing out what you had suggested. I personally have never had to "jump" any pins or anything and am not sure how I would do so as some quick googling has resulted in some confusion on my end. As for the standoffs and fastener related suggestions, standoffs were installed to case and the motherboard was NOT screwed directly into the tray and there are NO standoffs other than the ones that line up with the ATX mounting holes on the motherboard. Once more, thank you for your time and these suggestions, I'll be sure to update after some testing and double checking of wiring.
 

Vic 40

Titan
Ambassador
I personally have never had to "jump" any pins or anything and am not sure how I would do so as some quick googling has resulted in some confusion on my end.
For jumper starting connect the two pins for the "Power Switch" for just a second. A small screwdriver will do fine or any other metallic object with a small point.



Your motherboard's placement,

 
It might not be power related. Some of the Ryzen boards behave badly and it actually has to do with RAM not training right during POST, requiring power removed. Sometimes there is a BIOS fix, or perhaps your RAM OC is unstable (also common for Ryzen). I would first try loading BIOS defaults (or clearing CMOS) and see if you can power up correctly. If you need help getting your memory stable, that's pretty easy for me too, not so much everyone else ;D
 
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DominicU1571

Honorable
Dec 31, 2013
13
0
10,510
0
UPDATE:
I did absolutely nothing and now the computer powers down and power back on with no issues. No odd post codes or anything, no bios changes, just works fine. The only difference I can tell is that my corsair lighting hub is no longer being detected on my iCUE software and the 3 fans connected to it default to the hardware default that was previously set in iCUE. I doubt that had anything to do with the system not being able to power back on normally so I am not sure what happened but as of right now the computer works just fine.
 

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